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March 03, 1984 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-03-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Dail

Chrysler renegotiates
Michigan loan

LANSING, Mich. (UPI) - The "new"
Chrysler Corp. is getting a new deal on
its $150-million loan from Michigan, in-
eluding a shorter repayment schedule
and lower interest, it was announced
yesterday.
The original terms of the loan called
for an interest rate of 15.5 percent and a
repayment schedule stretching through
1995.
{ UNDER THE new terms, the interest
rate is dropped to 11 percent and
repayment will be made by 1989.
As part of the agreement, Chrysler
paid off $20 million of the loan three to
four years ahead of schedule.
Chrysler Vice President James
Tolley handed Gov. James Blanchard a
check for the $20 million at a Capitol
ceremony announcing the loan
renegotiation.

THE PAYMENT reduces the loan
principal to $125 million. Chrysler paid
the other $5 million on the principal
Jan. 4 in accordance with the previous
repayment schedule.
The new repayment schedule calls
for five annual payments of $25 million
each starting Jan. 4, 1985.
Michigan Treasurer Robert Bowman
said the new terms are a good deal for
the state, despite the lower interest
rate, because the duration of the loan
has been shortened.
And he said Chrysler had the option of
merely paying off the loan to avoid the
high interest payments originally
negotiated in 1980.
Chrysler has paid Michigan more
than $89 million in interest on the loan
since the first payment was made in
May 1980.

Democratic hopefuls

- Saturday, March 3, 1984 - Page 3
Bartender
says he
expected
r-oin tavern
FALL RIVER, Mass. (UPI) - The
bartender in a tavern where a young
mother said she was raped testified
yesterday he feared trouble just
minutes before and said he was ready
to call police and have her taken out.
Carols Machado told a Bristol
Superior Court jury he was worried
because the 22-year-old mother of two
was "laughing and talking with the
boys" around the bar at Big Dan's
Tavern in nearby New Bedford,
"I WAS SEEING things like I'd never
seen before, a group of guys around a
girl in. such a tight conversation,"
Machado said, testifying in Portuguese
with his remarks translated into
English by a court interpreter.
"I was going to call the police to put her
out," the bartender added.
Machado, testifying for the third day in
the trial of six men accused in the
alleged gang rape, said he asked a
patron to call police, but the man did
nothing.
Minutes later, the bartender said, he
heard a loud noise, looked over the bar
and saw the woman on the floor, with
two defendants trying to pull off her
blue jeans.
He said the woman ordered three
drinks before the incident and was
talking to most of the other men in the
bar, with her arms around one of them.
Under questioning by defense
lawyers, Machado, who is not a US.
citizen, denied suggestions he was
testifying for the prosecution to avoid
deportation for illegal possession of
firearms during an unrelated incident
last October.

campaign
From AP and UPI
Walter Mondale told Maine voters
yesterday that "I haven't made a
promise I can't keep" and headed south
for an Atlanta faceoff with Sen. Gary
Hart, who is pressing his assertiontha
people are more interested in "new
visions" than Mondale's endorsements.
While Mondale and Hart were
touching political bases in New
England, Sen. John Glenn and the Rev
Jesse Jackson concentrated their effor
ts in the South, where the four Democratic
presidential candidates are fighting foi
convention delegate seats at stake
'March 13 in the Florida, Georgia and
Alabama primaries.
MONDALE, who has conceded he nc
longer is the front-runner and is in a
tight battle with Hart for the presiden
tial nomination, unveiled his new
aggressive style as he returned to the
stump in Maine.

in South

Hart, the 47-year-old contender, also
refused to claim the role of favorite and
said during a brief campaign stop in
Vermont, "I don't think people should
expect a miracle every Tuesday."~
As Mondale and Hart proclaimed
they are in a two-way horserace, the
odd man out - Glenn of Ohio
- campaigned in Georgia, desparately
looking for the "Super Tuesday'
breakthrough that could keep his can-
didacy alive.
Glenn, pouring all of his dwindling
resources into the South, has shut down
his offices in Texas, Michigan, Maine
and Washington.
Jackson, ,lashing out at Hart, Mon-
dale and Glenn in almost non-stop tours
of the South, campaigned in Florida.
McGovern is concentrating his cam-
paign in Massachusetts, the only state
to vote for him in the 1972 presidential
race.

Shutdown AP Photo
The Davis-Besse nuclear power station in Port Clinton, Ohio, shut itself off yesterday after a steam system valve stuck.
The incident was given low priority as an emergency and Toledo Edison officials said they don't know how long the
plant will be out of service.
Board censures blind doctor

OGDENSBURG, N.Y.(AP) - A doctor blinded in an auto-
accident said yesterday he expected punishment for
operating on at least eight patients after he lost his sight, but
thinks the state went too far with a censure that now
threatens his practice.
The state board of regents said John Bongiovanni, a
urologist, performed at least eight urinary, bladder or
prostate operations in late 1980 or early 1981.
THE STATE HEALTH Department announced yesterday
that it had fined A. Barton Hepburn hospital $4,000 for
allowing the same operations. John Symons, the hospital
administrator, who hired Bongiovanni as the hospital's
medical director last Feb. 1, said the hospital agreed to the
fine in July 1983.
He said the medical procedures performed by Bongiovanni
were not surgery "in the sense of cutting people open."
"They were operative procedures which sometimes are

done in doctors' offices; in some situations done by ancillary
personnel non-physicians," Symons said. However, a state
Health Department official said the procedures were
surgical and that thge censure would stand.
AS BONGIOVANNI'S punishment, the regents limited his
license to practice until he undergoes retraining; banned his
guide dog from patient areas; ordered him to inform patients
that he is blind; proscribed his participation in further
surgery, and limited the urology practice to consultation.
"The Health Department isn't going to change its mind. I
can tell you that," said Kathleen Tanner, Director of the Of-
fice of Professional Medical Conduct.
He said the retraining restriction was a veiled message
that he should undergo retraining in some non-manual prac-
tice of medicine, such as psychiatry.

4HAPPENINGS
Highlight
The School of Music sponsors several recitals, including bassoon,; voice
and clarinet performances, starting at 4 p.m. in Recital Hall. Also, the Con-
temporary Directions Ensemble plays at 8:30 in Rackham Anphitheateri
Films
AAFC - Casablanca, 7 & 9 p.m., MLB 4.
Alt. Act. - Betrayal, 7 & 9 p.m., Nat. Sci.
Cinema Guild - Danton, 7 & 9:30 p.m., Lorch Hall.
Cinema 2 - War Games, 7 & 9:15 p.m., Angell Aud. A.
Mediatrics - Gaslight, 7 p.m., Sunset Boulevard, 9 p.m., MLB 4.
Performances
Reader's Theatre Guild - Oral performance of works by Updike, Poe,
Douglas Adams, Lewis Carroll, 8p.m., Anderson Room, Union.
Hillel - Chava Albertstein, 8p.m., Lydia Mendelssohn Theater.
Ark - Rare Air, 8 p.m., 1421 Hill Street.
Speakers
Union of Students for Israel - Several Speakers, "Arab-Israeli Relations
- Past, Present, and Future," 11 a.m., 1429 Hill Street.
Non Jewish Agenda - Rita Giacaman and Tamara Berger, "The West
Bank Today: Palestinian and Israeli Women Speak," 4 p.m., Ann Arbor
Public Library.
Progressive Zionist Caucus - Gary Brenner, "Peace Now Today," 4:30
p.m., Union.
Meetings
Tae Kwon Do Club - 9p.ni., Coliseum.
Ann Arbor Go Club - 2 p.m., room 1433 Mason Hall.
Muslim Students Assoc. -7:30 p.m., Muslim House.
Miscellaneous
Matthaei Botanical Gardens - Lobby Sale, 10 a.m., Botanical Gardens.
Affirmative Action - Bronze Elegance Fashion Show, 8 p.m., Union
Ballroom.
Latin American Culture Project - Brazilian Carnival, 8 p.m., Half-Way
Inn.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109

U.S. aided England, magazine says

(Continued from Page 1)

American help," the report said.
IT SAID WEINBERGER, "an ardent
Anglophile," pushed through the aid
without fully informing Alexander
Haig, secretary of state at the time.
The Economist said Weinberger's
"most remarkable offer of the war"
was a proposal to let Britain use the
11,750-ton USS Guam if either of
Britain's two aircraft carriers, HMS
Invincible or HMS Hermes, were put
out of action.
But defense sources in Washington
said it would have been unrealistic to
turn over the helicopter carrier Guam

to the British during the war because of
the time needed to instruct a new crew
on how to operate such a vessel.
THE USE OF an American crew on
the Guam in a war zone would have
been out of the question, the defense
sources said.
The Economist said 98 percent of
British intelligence on Argentine
movements was supplied by the United
States, and "Britain persuaded the
Americans to move a military satellite
from a Soviet-watching orbit over the
northern hemisphere to cover the
Falklands area."
The order to sink the Argentinian

cruiser Belgrano, in which 368 Argen-
tinian sailors died, was probably com-
municated to the British nuclear sub-
marine, HMS Conquerer, over an
American military satellite link, the
magazine said.
American aid, The Economist said,
poured into the American Wideawake
airbase on British-owned Ascension
Island in the south Atlantic. It included
Sidewinder AIM-9L missiles, "the
single most decisive weapon of the
campaign," 12.5 million gallons of
aviation fuel and thousands of mortar
rounds.

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9,600 screened for measles

(Continued from Page 1)
of the University Hospital, Briefer said,
but is neither a student nor a campus,
resident.
Briefer said he didn't "think we'd
ever have an epidemic on campus"
because of the swiftness in which
Health Services initiated the
inoculation drive.
The vaccination drive was most in-
tense the week of Feb. 13, just before
spring break. Health officials were
worried that some students would carry
the virus with them around the country
during break.
"WE'RE NOT aware of any other
outbreaks around the country, but
(now) would be just about the time (10
days after exposure) that symptoms
would be showing if they were infec-
ted," Daniels said.
Daniels said that University health
officials are trying to prevent another
viral scare by compiling a thorough
immunization evaluation on all studen-
ts. They are considering sending
evaluation forms to students, but that is
still in the planning stages, she added.
"It's not easy, though," Daniels said,
adding that health surveys are not
mandatory and few students take the
time to fill them out.

"It's also very difficult because very
few students know their immunization
status," she said.
Briefer is trying to get the ad-
ministration's cooperation in making
the surveys a requirement, but so far he
has had no success.
, The State Department of Health ab-
sorbed the cost of the immunization
drive by providing the vaccinations
free of charge to the University. Health
Services is still giving free in-
noculations.
764-0558
764-0558

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DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND
LITERATURE
Get Good Teaching Experience While
Working Toward an M.A.
$3150 per year, plus 8 hours free tuition per SEMESTER
For information call James Reynolds or
Judith Johnson 487-1363 or 487-4220
DEADLINE: MARCH 15, 1984
For application forms write:
DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE-STUDIES
English Department
EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY
Ypsilanti, MI 48197
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
2, \
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Malicious Intent

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