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March 02, 1984 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-03-02

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, March 2, 1984 - Page 3

Reagonomics builds
.poverty, speaker says

TV writers
postpone strike

By ANDREA WILLIAMS
Working women, along with blacks
and Hispanics, have been hit hardest by
Pr esident Ronald Reagan's economic
policies, Sheldon Danziger, Director of
the Institute of Research on Poverty,
.old an audience of about 150 people
athered at Rackham Auditorium
vesterday.
' "The poverty rates for blacks,
ispanics, and working women is
higher today by 20 percent than the
poverty rates of the 1960's," Danziger
'satd.
DaU nziger spoke at a seminar in
Rackham entitled "The Impact of
Reaganomics on Children and the
1 :mily .
The most pressing problem, .he said,
is that under Reagan's budget cuts low-

income wage earners can no longer
work and still receive welfare paymen-
ts. Unlike the policies before Reagan's
term, only those who are unemployed
fall within the president's definition of
"truly needy" and can receive benefits.
Because very few women were
willing to quit their jobs in order to
collect benefits, they ended up taking a
loss in their actual income. "There was
a decline in these people's salaries by 17
percent," he said.
Danziger outlined an economic scale
which rated poverty at 3.3. Danziger
estimated that Reagan's policies ac-
counted for between .6 and two of the
points. Unfavorable social trends and
residual effects account for the rest of
the points, he said.

From AP and UPI
NEW YORK - Four hours before a
midnight strike deadline, leaders of the
Writers Guild voted yesterday to post-
pone a threatened walkout by 600
newswriters against CBS and ABC for
three days.
The Guild's executive council voted
21-0 to give the networks "one last
chance" to come up with a settlement
acceptable to the union, said Mona
Mangan, associate executive director
of the Guild. The new deadline was set
for 12:01 a.m. Monday.
THE UNION'S membership was to
vote on the postponement last night.
"Monday is a better day for us,

because the networks are going full
steam. We want to strike when it has
most impact," Mangan said.
Meanwhile, talks were continuing
between representatives of the union
and the networks, with union jurisdic-
tion apparently the biggest stumbling.
block to a settlement.
A MANAGEMENT proposal that the
Guild give up some previously ex-
clusive union work would mean a loss of
jobs, Guild spokesman Dan Ratner
said.
"It's the issue of jurisdiction that
could cause a strike," Ratner said. "We
can't negotiate on that."
If members vote to strike, anchor-
men on network news shows will either
have to write all their own copy or
"have some executive producer do it
for them," Ratner said.
"It means that Dan Rather and Peter
Jennings will not have their writers,"~
Ratner said.

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Gay rights activists

!HAPPENINGS- rally for policy statement

4

highlight
Wilfred Rollman will speak on "The Historical Perspective of Arab-Israeli
Relations," at 8 p.m. tonight at 1429 Hill St. The talk is sponsored by the
Union of Students for Israel and the Progressive Zionist Caucus.
Films
AAFC - Psycho, Nat. Sci., 7 p.m.; Carrie, Nat. Sci., 9 p.m.
Alt. Act. - Annie Hall, MLB 4,7 & 9 p.m.
Cinema II - Ciao Manhattan, Aud. A,'7& 9 p.m.
Cinema Guild - The Fugitive Kind, Lorch, 7 p.m.; On the Waterfront,
Lorch, 9:10 p.m.
Performances
- School of Music - Violin recital, Eleanor Kosek, Recital Hall, 6 p.m.;
Campus Band, Hill Aud., 8 p.m.; piano recital, Kirsten Taylor, Recital Hall,
8 p.m.
Ark - Rare Air, 1421 Hill St., 8 p.m.
Union Arts - Music at mid-Day, Judy Tsou, harpsichordist, Pendleton
Rm., Union, 12:15 p.m.
Performance Netv, ork - People Dancing,408 W. Washington St., 8 p.m.
The Brecht Company - "St. Joan of the Stockyards," Residential College
Aud., East Quad, 8 p.m.
Organization of Arab Students - Evening of National Songs & Music
featuring George Kirmi, Union Ballroom, call 561-3950.
Speakers
South and Southeast Asian Studies - Brown Bag, Linda Lim, "Life in the
-Brave New World: Religion, Ethnicity, Class & Gender in Singapore," Lane
Hall Commons, noon.
Nat. Resources - Laird; Norton Distinguished Visitor Series, John
Crowell, "Public Land Management - National Policies & Priorities," 1040
Dana, 3:05 p.m.
Romance Lang.; Programs in Comparative Lit. - John Beverly,
"Hispanism in America: Problems & Perspects," E. Lec. Rm., 3rd fl.
rl kcham, 4p.m.
S .C'R'- Richard Phillips, "The Developing Computer Environment at the
Col'ege.of Engineering," 3-5 p.m. To register call 763-2367.
.Anthropology - Daniel Bradburd, "Economics of Pastoralism: Case
Studies and Wider Implications," W. Conf. Rm., 4th floor, Rackham, 4 p.m.
Engineering - Andrew Robinson, "A Fully-Self-Aligned Joint Gate
Technology," 2076 E. Engin., 10 a.m.; Bernard Koff, "Propulsion and
Readiness in the 21st Century," 1017 Dow Building, 12:30 p.m.; Duncan
Steele, "A Study of Atomic Collisions Using Nonlinear (Lasar) Spec-
troscopy," White Aud., Cooley Building, 3:45 p.m.
Chemistry - Vincent Pecoraro, "Exchange-Inert Metallonucleotides as
Enzyme Active-Site Probes," Rm. 1200, Chem. Bldg., 4 p.m.
Meetings
Ann Arbor Chinese Bible Class- Univ. Reformed Church, 7:30 p.m.
Korean Christian Fellowship - Bible study, Campus Chapel, 9 p.m.
Chinese Students Christian Fellowship - Bible Study, 3rd floor, Trotter
House, 8p.m.
Muslim Students Assoc. - Arabic Circle, discussion on events in the
Muslim World, 407 N. Ingalls, 9p.m.
Markley Council and staff-Reggae Night, Dance - Rockers, 8 p.m.; dan--
cing, 10 p.m., multi-purpose rm., Markley Hall.
Miscellaneous
Duplicate Bridge Club - Open Game, League, 7:15 p.m.
Tae Kwon Do Club - Practice, CCRB Martial Arts Rm., 5-7 p.m.
: Mich. Gay Undergraduates - Semi-annual trip to Canada, call 761-3051.
AstroFest 133 - Films, The Active Sun; The Quiet Sun, Jim Loudon, "The
;Incredible, Marginal, Dangerously Visible, Terminal Annular Eclipse,"
MLB 3,. 7:30 p.m.
MSA - MSA elections mass meeting, Pendleton Rm., Union, 4 p.m.
UM Folk Dance Club - International folk dancing, teaching, 8-9:30,
equest dancing, 9:30-midnight, 3rd floor dance studio, corner of State &
vVS' 1 l1ia n.
Matthaei Botanical Gardens - The Beauty of Ikebana, flower arranging
display, 1800 North Dixboro Rd., 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
VCBN - News program, 5:30 p.m.

(Continued from Page 1)
defeated," the group of gay rights ac-
tivists gathered at about 12:30 p.m.
yesterday in the Diag to start the rally.
The group then marched across State
Street, past the Cube, and up to the
second floor of the Fleming Ad-
ministration Building to Shapiro's of-
fice.
Finding Shapiro out for lunch,
demonstrators settled into the
president's conferenceroom chanting,
"Two, four, six, eight, tell Shapiro we
won't wait" as they waited for him to
return.
WHEN HE ARRIVED, Shapiro
greeted the group's cheers and jeers
with a smile. He refused, however, to
commit himself on any policy or date.
"I think it's unfortunate that it's
taken so long," Shapiro said, referring
to administrators' consideration of a
policy. "(But) I'm not ready to issue a
policy statement now."
Last October Shapiro said that he
favored issuing a presidential policy
statement to protect gay rights, but he
has yet to formulate any proposal. The
policy statement is a weaker statement
than creating a regents' bylaw, which
is what the group originally asked for.
ALTHOUGH he declined to comment
on what work still needs to be com-

pleted before a decision can be made,
Shapiro said he has been working on the
policy. "I've probably worked a good
deal more than anybody in this room on
this," he said, eliciting groans from the
protestors.
He said there was nothing the group
could do to speed up the decision-
making process.
Despite Shapiro's refusal to speed up
the process, most of the participants
felt the rally was successful in
promoting gay rights on campus.
"I THINK it was, a success," said
sophomore Naomi Braine last
night after the rally. "All you can hope
to do is build up the pressure and raise
the issue. That's all you can get out of
one action . . . (Shapiro) may not have
said anything, but he wasn't very com-
fortable."
But not all the group's members were
so encouraged by the results.
"I'm even more angry and frustrated
now than when I first walked into the
room," said Cathy Godre, a fifth-year
LSA senior. But that anger and
frustration is motivating her to put
more energy into fighting for a policy,
she said.
"I can guarantee that there will be
more pressure. This is not the end, this
is the beginning," she said.

PEACE NOW
SATURDAY, MARCH 3, 1984
4:30 p.m. at the Michigan Union
Featuring
GARY BREMMER
One of the leaders of Peace Now in Israel
THE PUBLIC IS INVITED

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