100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 02, 1984 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-03-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Students too

busy

to

learn

See Weekend Magazine

Ninety-four Years
of
Editorial Freedom

Cl
I E

LIE 43UU

1 Iai1

Better
Mostly sunny with a high of about
30 degrees.

Vol. XCIV-No. 119 Copyright 1984, The Michigan Daily Ann Arbor, Michigan - Friday, March 2, 1984 Fifteen Cents Ten Pages

Trpley,
'M'bury
Badgers,
*84-75
By PAUL HELGREN
Instead of playing over their heads,
this time the Wisconsin Badgers got in
over their heads, falling to a taller and
more talented Michigan team, 84-75 at
Crisler Arena last night.
Unlike last Jan. 14 when Steve
Yoder's undersized mix of plodders and
scrappers surprised Michigan 71-64,
this one was never any contest. If you
rdon't believe it, just ask Yoder.
"IT LOOKED to me like a pretty good
mismatch tonight, I don't know about
you guys (the media)," said Yoder, ap-
parently not too surprised by last
night's result. "I'm a little bit of a
realist. I look out there and I see some
pretty good, people playing for
Viichigan, especially inside."
Yoder characterized the game with
lucid accuracy. Except for one period
See BLUE, Page 10

Gays call

for

action

Frustrated activists
rally in Shapiro's office

By GEORGEA KOVANIS
About 55 activists, pushing for a"
campus non-discrimination policy for
gays, showed their impatience with the
University yesterday by marching
from the Diag to the office of University
President Harold Shapiro.
Members of Lesbian and Gay
Rights On Campus (LaGROC) first
asked University administrators 15
months ago for a policy prohibiting
discrimination on the basis of sexual
preference. At last month's meeting of
the University regents, the group set a
deadline for administrators to issue the
policy statement by yesterday.
THE GROUP IS TIRED of waiting,

members said.
"There is discrimination occurring
and as long as the administration
doesn't have a policy they are
facilitating this discrimination," said
Diana DeVries yesterday during the
rally. "Things can happen so we don't
have to live this way...we don't want
pity, we want a policy."
Still, however, the group failed to get
a policy. Shapiro said it was unfor-
tunate that the process took so long but
refused to say when he might issue such
a policy.
CHANTING "GAY rights now" and
"The people, united, have never been
See GAY, Page 3

Daily Photo by TOD WOOLF
Gay rights activists yesterday ask University President Harold Shapiro to speed up his work on a policy which would
prohibit the University from discriminating on the basis of sexual preference.

Library bills

By RACHEL GOTTLIEB,
Trying to improve University library,
services by computerizing the cir-
culation system seems to have created
more problems than it's eliminated.
For the first six months the Geac
system was in operation, a computer
quirk prevented the library from sen-
ding students fine notices for overdue
books.
BUT solving that problem last month
only created another.
Now students are receiving overdue
notices - only the fines are for books

they didn't check out
the cost - one bill as
caused a few studen
shock.
The Daily hasl
students who were1
$400 for overdue boo
checked out or had a
IN ALL the cas
students the price
library to replace ti
the standard 25 cen
fee.
Kevin Namey, a ji
of Engineering, sai
bill to replace a bo

unsuspecting
t of the library. And weeks earlier.
high as $400 - has Eilee Gaughan, a sophomore in the
its' jaws to drop in Residential College, said she received
an "outrageous" $50 bill for a book she
learned of eight "never even heard of".
billed from $50 to LSA SOPHOMORE Jim Schoenburg
oks they had never returned a book to the GraduateLibrary
lready returned. Feb. 7 = one day before Geac ironed
ses Geae charged out the problem that prevented it from
it would cost the mailing overdue notices - and then
he books instead of received a bill for $50 to replace the
1t per day overdue book.
The unlucky recipient of the $400 bill
unior in the College was charged for the cost of replacing
d he received a $50 eight books. Another student received a
ok he returned two $100 bill and three others were each

students
charged $50 fines. Although Joan
Spaide, supervisor of circulation at the
Graduate Library, said she wasn't
aware of the problem, students won't
have to pay the fines. Spaide said the
problem will be corrected as soon as
possible.
"All we want is our books back," she
said. "We're not interested in charging
people outrageous amounts of money.
Geac is programmed to send students
a warning notice one week after a book
is due, said David McDonald, head of
the library systems office. If a student
doesn't return the book within a week, a
second notice is sent, he said.

Hollings Askew leave race
From AP and UPI Askew joined him an the sidelines.
Sen. Ernest Hollings of South Carolina and former Florida "This is the last day and the last mile," Askew told an af-
Gov. Reubin Askew withdrew yesterday as candidates for the Thiss test nd the e," Aew t h
presidential nomination, cutting the Democratic field to five t n n
contenders going into "Super Tuesday" with its jackpot of people."
morethan540 elegtes.Askew. got only 1 percent in .New Hampshire and told a
more than 500 delegates. .Miami news conference, "I tried to be true to myself and my
Hollings and Askew, both broke and badly beaten in Iowa deepest convictions.
and New Hampshire, pulled out, leaving former Vice THREE OF the survivors - Hart, Glenn and Jackson -
President Walter Mondale, Sen. Gary Hart of Colorado, Sen. stumped through the South which has primaries in Alabama,
John Glenn of Ohio, Jesse Jackson and former Sen. George Georgia and Florida on Super Tuesday - March 13.
McGovern in contention.,
MCGOVERN, the Democratic presidential candidate in Askew's withdrawal could have a major impact on the
197CGalsoVEayNwithedawaftrtheMassahusd e tsadida Florida primary where the latest polls showed him running.a
1972, also may withdraw after the Massachusetts primary, weak second behind Mondale but ahead of Glenn and Hart.
Mondale was in Washington yesterday and planned to
Hollings, the tart-tongued Southerner, announced his campaign in Maine and Georgia today.
decision in Washington, following weak showings in the Iowa GLENN spoke to the Alabama Legislature at the state
caucuses and New Hampshire: . Capitol in Montgomery, while Hart stopped at the city's air-
Hollings said he was "stepping aside" and told a news con- port for a news conference at which he said, "I don't expect
ference that he no longer had the money to continue and that to be rejected in the South."
his candidacy "didn't get through to enough people." See DEMOCRATS, Page 6
SEVERAL hours after Hollings made his announcement,SeDEORTPg6

Tied down Daily Photo by TOD WOOLF
An East Quad resident studies in the Quad's Greene Lounge. All the furniture
in the lounge has been chained to the floor in order to prevent it from ending
up in dorm rooms.
ort arou
in west side yard

Askew
..says he was "candid"

. n .. .... . . .. ..n............................................::...............n..............v..v.........::.....:::wv.v::::":.v.....x:..... .*.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..:'"i{+i: iL~iv
. . . . . . . . .. . .t......... ........ . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . ... . . . . ........................... .. .................. ....*.... .... . ....ti... ............... .............v..r...*... . ..................................................v........*.,........*...*.........t.............
.... \. ...... 'v,....v..n........ . .... .... ................... . r........... .. .n.. ' .
....... .......... ............ . . . ..x ...... ......... ................. ..... ...............,......-.- . . . . . ............-.-.........-............................................ . . . . . .

Cook dies
following 38
years with
fraternity

By MARCY FLEISHER
For the past 38 years Albert "Wildcat" Wall was
more than just a cook for Phi Gamma Delta frater-
nity members.
His ukelele playing and singing was the star attrac-
tion at many fraternity parties. And if any fraternity
members had a little too much to drink, Wall would
offer to drive their dates home.
BUT last Wednesday night, during spring vacation,
the 87-year-old Wall died in his sleep.
Wall made a strong impression on many
generations of Phi Gamma Delta members, says
fraternity President Scott Almquist.
"Albert Wall was the most incredible person and

tradition that this house has ever - and will ever
see," Almquist said. "No one will ever be able to
replace him."
WALL donated his body to the University's Myiedical
School. He is survived by one daughter, Bettie Wilson
who lives in Ann Arbor, and a son, Richard, who lives
in Cleveland, Ohio.
Wilson said that nothing meant more to her father
than the fraternity and he considered it his home.
Wall was considered one of the family, according to
Almquist.
"Wildcat thought that the fraternal experience was
the best thing in the world for a college guy. He
See PHI,'Page 5

By NANCY GOTTESMAN
A local Vietnam veteran's souvenir
mortar shell caused quite a stir this
Wednesday when a neighbor found it on
the lawn and called in the bomb squad.
The tale started eighteen years ago in
South Vietnam where Ann Arbor
resident Gary Lillie was caught in the
midst of a nighttime fire fight with Viet
Cong soldiers. Lillie was in a foxhole.
THE VIET Cong were attempting to
shoot down American helicopters above
him, Lillie recalls. And while he was
nestled in the foxhole, an empty shell

casing thumped to earth only ten feet
away from him.
He wasn't so much afraid of it
blowing up, since it probably had
already exploded in the air, he said. But
any closer and the five to ten pound cast
iron shell may have done him in.
"A little puff of wind and I might have
been dead," he said.
LILLIE brought the shell with him as
a momento when he returned home in
1966.
Eighteen yearslater, he accidently
See SHELL, Page 2

.. .. ...v..~.... ..... . .{.v................... ........... .... ..... ::'"i::?.v.r'.r". . .. .. .. ..
.... ............................................................ ......................:........... ................. ....................... ........... .............,...:............',. ... :. .: ................. ...
...................... ....... ............ ... .,.................... ............... ..... ................... .............. .................... .............................
-... .... ...... .. ... ... . ... n . ... ...:. ..................

Special delivery
OMINO'S PIZZA may deliver, but Cottage Inn
had snappier service Wednesday night, making
a special stop at the Night Owl van. Packed with
at least 20 tired and cold riders, the van' was

pizza every night on the route, one hungry freeloader
asked, "What nights do you drive?" e?"
Chest hair
C HESTS ARE best left hidden by buttoned shirts in
Novi. At least that's what a hairdresser says who is
seeking more than $200,000 in damages after a hair salon
fired him last year. Rick Debrincat, 37, claims he was
"blackballed" by area hair salons after the firing, and for-

hair salon, and according to Debrincat's suit, a Dayton
Hudson representative called his boss a few days later and
demanded an apology or Debrincat's job. Debrincat said
he refused to apologize and was fired in October. El
Ice breakers
. OR A $50 prize, canoists have the chance to break
I'through ice, make six portages, and paddle down 30
miles of the Huron River, from Lake Portage to Ypsilanti.
Canoesport of Ann Arbor, the event sponsor, will give the
top prize to the first hardy pair to finish the course, and to

The Daily almanac
ON THIS DATE in 1955, MSU's student newspaper
announced it would stop referring to the school as
Michigan State College because it "deserves to be called a
university since it is one in every sense of the word."
Also on this date in history:
" 1948 - The Student Affairs Committee voted to ask the
regents to "clarifydand liberalize" the University's ban on
political speeches.
" 1964 - LSA's faculty voted 2-1 to approve the Residen-
; .,n y pp

>

i

i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan