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February 28, 1984 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1984-02-28

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E

Page 6 - The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, February 28, 1984
Chernenko gains power,
named eornnan der-in-ehief

I

4

MOSCOW (UPI) - Konstantin Cher-
nenko has consolidated his grip on
power quickly by adding the post of
commander-in-chief of the Soviet ar-
med forces to his leadership of the
Communist Party, a Western diplomat

said yesterday.
The appointment was seen as a good
indication Chernenko would be named
to the largely ceremonial office of
president, thus giving him all three
positions of power in the Soviet hierar-
chy held by his predecessor Yuri An-
dropov.
No official, announcement has been
made, but the Western diplomat said
Marshal Nikolai Ogarkov referred to
Chernenko as chairman of the Defense
Council at a reception to celebrate Ar-
med Forces Day last Thursday.
"It's been kept a secret, but it seems
that Ogarkov definitely wanted us to
know that Chernenko was head of the
Defense Council," the diplomat said.
Soviet sources said the Supreme
Soviet would convene in a special
session soon after elections Sunday and
that the president would be announced
then.
"How or when that (the presidency)
will happen is difficult to know," the
diplomat said.
But another Western diplomat said
the military job did not guarantee
Chernenko would become president and
there had been speculation the office

could go to Mikhail Gorbachev, 52, or
Grigory Romanov, 61, both members of
the ruling Politburo. The two had been
Chernenko's rivals for party, chief
following the death of Andropov on Feb.
9.
Chernenko, 72, was unanimously
elected general-secretary of the Com-
munist Party Feb. 13. By becoming
commander-in-chief, Chernenko holds
two of the three powerful positions held
by both Leonid Brezhnev and Andropov
at the time of their deaths.
The move indicated that Chernenko,
a member of the old guard loyal to
Brezhnev, could be consolidating power
in the Politburo believed to be divided
between the older members and new
members whose careers surged during
Andropov's 15 months in power.
Andropov assumed the commander-
in-chief mantle by May of last year, six
months after being named secretary
general. In June, he was named
president.
In an open letter Monday to all who
sent him congratulations on becoming
Communist Party leader, Chernenko
pledged to implement economic and
social programs drawn up.

fE

Cherncn ko
- . consolidates his power

Crippled tanker sinks in
Gulf of Mexico waters

4

AP Photo
Disaster rocks Brazil
Survivors of a shantytown fire in Cubatao, Brazil search through the rubble of their homes yesterday for personal
belongings. The blaze killed over 80 people Saturday.
FBI ready for terrorist threats

",7 .wNEW ORLEANS (AP) - The 661-foot
*ie tanker American Eagle, its side ripped
" Copen by a fatal explosion Sunday, sank
y C , 0yesterday with 24 crewmen aboard
" while waiting for a tow in the gale-
pr g whipped Gulf of Mexico, the Coast
Guard said.
Two crewmen were lost but the other

WHO AUTHORED THE PROPOSED STUDENT
CODE OF NON-ACADEMIC CONDUCT?
? ? AND WHY??
WHO SUPPORTS IT?
WHO OPPOSES IT?

22 were rescued when the American
Eagle went down at 5:40 p.m. about 180
miles southwest of New Orleans, said
Petty Officer Gary Starks at the Coast
Guard's 8th District headquarters.
THREE CREWMEN were killed and
three others were injured Sunday in an
unexplained explosion aboard the ship.
The blast left the American Eagle dead
in the water.
The tanker went down as a sea-going
tugboat was en route from Port Arthur,
Texas, to tow the ship to Galveston,
Texas, its original destination, Starks
said.
"The weather is pretty bad out there
- there are 16-foot seas, 40 knot winds
and low visibility," Starks said. "The
ship broke up from the weather, tossing
and turning out there.-
He said the injured men, some suf-
fering from hypothermia, would be
airlifted to coastal hospitals.

DETROIT (UPI) - FBI Director
Silliam Webster said yesterday that
agents are trained and ready to handle
any terrorist threats at the summer
Olympics or political conventions,
although he considers them unlikely.
"I think the United States is very in-
fertile ground for terrorists," he said.
"Having said that, it doesn't mean they
won't try."
HE SAID THE FBI had been working
for months to identify and intercept any
terrorist activity or deal with the taking
of hostages, such as at the Munich
Olympics.
"Our hostage rescue team is trained
and ready and will be on hand at the
Olympics," he said.
Webster told reporters concern about
terrorism has grown in the United

I think the United States is very infertile
grounds for terrorists. Having said that, it
doesn't mean they won't try.'
William Webster-
FBI Director

Y,
..;

States since the truck-bombing of the
Marine barracks in Beirut but the ac-
tual number of incidents has not in-
creased.
MOST OF THE terrorist acts in the
past year, he said, were related to
American activity in Central America
rather than the Middle East.
In'his speech, Webster also said that
no legitimate business is immune to

takeover by organized crime lookiig'
for places to launder profits of crimin hl
activity.
According to Webster, organized
crime is more sophisticated than eves''
but the rate of conviction is also mubhi'
higher. In the last two fiscal years,'he'
said, there have been 3,800 indictmenii
and 2,100 convictions.

614 G+ e

CAMPUS
MEET:
THE

Y:.j

Ilk

Ann Arborites awake to a blanket of snow

PRESS

PRESENTS

WILLIAM COLBURN, Faculty Chair of the University Council
MARY ROWLAND, President of the Michigan Student Assembly
Hear a Panel Ask Questions and Ask Your Own
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 29, 1984
4 P.M. KUENZEL ROOM, MICHIGAN UNION
ALL ARE INVITED TO ATTEND!!
SPONSORED BY:
and
CANTERBURY FRIENDS

(Continued from Page 1)
Northeast as well," Sammler said.
"The coastal sections are likely to get
quite a bit of rain."
ALTHOUGH THE storm fell short of
blizzard dimensions, it dumped the
heaviest snows to hit Indiana since the
Ann Arbor
Contact Lens Clinic
A Full Contact Lens Service
FEBRUARY SPECIAL
EXTENDED WEAR LENSES
$325
DR. PAUL C. USLAN
545 Church Street " Ann Arbor
769-1222

Blizzard of 1978, with foot-deep ac-
cumulations expected by nightfall. It
sent winter-smart residents scurrying
to markets to stock up on such staples
as milk. bread, cigarettes and toilet
paper.
"The blizzard in 1978 got everyone's
attention," explained Mark Thompson,
director of merchandising for the
Kroger Co. at Indianapolis.
"They're making runs on the essen-
tials. They're reacting like they may be
snowed in for days."
THE STORM 'blasted Missouri, en-
ding nearly a month of springlike
weather. The heavy snow - 18 inches in
the central part of the state - forced
the Missouri Senate to cancel its Mon-
day meeting when only one senator
made it to the Capitol in Jefferson City.
More than 4,500 residents of Oregon
County, in the Missouri Ozarks, were
without power yesterday when high
winds knocked a tree into a power line.
Southern Illinois was covered with
nearly 7 inches of snow and hundreds of
schools and businesses closed. Residen-

ts of the state's southern tip had "100
percent slush and 100 percent wet or
their highways," Illinois Department of
Transportation spokesman Brent
Emerson said.
MOST OF the Upper Midwest snow
belt escaped the heavy snows and win-
ds, but the sotrm system brought an
abrupt end to a stretch of unseasonably
balmy weather.
The chill was blamed for the death of
month-old twin boys in Chicago, who
died in a fire caused by an oven left on
Sunday night to heat the family's South
Side apartment, officials said.
The storm system brewed heavy
rains, high winds and tornadoes
throughout the eastern Gulf Coast.
HEAVY THUNDERSTORMS and
temperatures in the 30s hit northern
Louisiana - a dramatic change from
the sunny skies and 70-degree weather
of only two days before.
A tornado devastated four Lafayette
County, Fla., homes and two men were
reported drowned in high winds and
rough seas as a line of squalls packing

80 mph gusts: swept northern and cen-
tral Florida.
An Eglin AFB airman drowned early
yesterday after strong winds pushed
over a guardrail at the end of a pier, the
Okaloosa Sheriff's Department said. A
sailor was reported drowned at Fort
Walton Beach, Fla., after his 16-foot
catamaran capsized yesterday. The
Coast Guard said 40-mph winds stirred
5-to 7-foot seas.
- In the storm's wake, warming tem- 1
peratures melted snow that stranded
motorists and snapped power lines in
the Texas Panhandle Sunday.
The high winds early yesterday fan-
Jned a five-alarm fire that caused $2
million damage to an apartment com-
plex in Pleasant Grove, Texas. The
blaze in 'the Dallas suburb engulfed 54
units and left at least 150 people
homeless, officials said.
* One volunteer firefighter was killed
battling wind-whipped Texas
grassfires. The fires were reported un-
der control yesterday.

PARSONS
SCHOOL
OF DESIGN offers intermediate
to advanced courses this summer
in New York City.

Five weeks: June 25-July 26, 1984
Drawing/Painting/Environmental
Design/Illustration/Communication
Design/Photography/Fashion
Design/Fashion Illustration

............ ............ .......................... . .

1984 College Summer Session
Brochure Request
Parsons School of Design

1

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