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February 17, 1984 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-02-17

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, February 17, 1984 - Page 5

Glenn accuses Mondale o

-,-7

Sen. John Glenn, who has slipped into
a second-place tie with Rev. Jesse
Jackson according to a new national
poll, accused Democratic presidential
front-runner Walter Mondale yesterday
of lying about his involvement with
Alaska pipeline legislation.
Mondale had been asked during an
Iowa debate last Saturday about lob-
bying for pipeline legislation that would
allow certain construction costs to be
passed on to consumers.
"The pre-billing issue that you're
talking about, I was always opposed to
that," Mondale replied at the time. "I
never did any lobbying on that. I wasn't

'Fritz can't have it both ways. He can't
have been for pre-billing back then and tell
the voters today that he was 'always
against."
-John Glenn
Democratic presidential candidate

f lying
letting them know the former vice
president was 'on board."'
Mondale has denied lobbying,
although he was a paid consultant to
one of the companies involved in
building the pipeline. And he has said
assertions to the contrary come from
rival candidates desperate to revive
their own campaigns. Glenn also cited a
1982 interview with the Minneapolis
Tribune in which Mondale is quoted as
saying that he supported pre-billing.
"Fritz can't have it both ways,"
Glenn said. "He can't have been for
pre-billing back then and tell the voters
today that he was 'always against."'

involved on that issue because I believe
in standing up for the consumer."
"THAT STATEMENT by Mr. Mon-
dale is untrue," Glenn declared yester-
day at a Washington news conference.

"In the halls of Congress, it was no
secret that Fritz Mondale and others
were associated with the pipeline
project - an association that would.
help influence members of Congress by

Proposed student conduct
code sparks debate

o4x.Z\
b,
-,. & v, rya
Up and over Daily Photo by TOD WOOLF
Despite his broken arm, Ann Arbor resident Adam Grahm jumps off his
skate board, over the railing in front of the Graduate Library yesterday,
only to land back on the board.

(Continued from Page 1)
sity has traditionally left to civil
authorities or police.
Students who violate the code could.
face punishment as severe as expulsion.
after being tried by an internal judicial
system that would be instituted under
the proposed rules.
THERE IS NO need for the Univer-
sity to adopt such rules to police student
behavior, said West Quad Building
Director Alan Levy, who spoke on the
panel
"Ninety to 99 percent of the incidents
I deal with (in the dormitory) would
never fall under this code," Levy said.
"I believe (serious forms of miscon-
duct) can be handled with the vehicles
we have now."
Yet the University has rarely enfor-
ced the current rules for student con-
duct.
ALONG WITH Ellis and Levy,
panelist Jonathan Rose who works at
the University's Student Legal Services
office criticized the code because it
would only effect students and not
faculty and staff members.
Rose who has disapproved of the
proposed rules since they were first
drafted last Spring, said many of the of-
fenses cited in the code are already
prohibited under civil and criminal
laws.
University administrators, however,

say that the code is necessary because
it gives them a lever to punish students
for problems such as sexual
harassment. The code would also
protect victims in such incidents, added
Sharphorn, a policy advisor for the
University's vice president for
academic affairs and provost Billy
Frye.
But Rose said that a University policy
on sexual harassment isn't necessary
because students can file suit in courts.
"I don't think that they need a code
for sexual harassment. If so, it needs to
be demonstrated," Rose said.
POI ce
notes
Woman assaulted
A thirty-nine-year-old Ann Arbor
woman was sexually assaulted Mon-
day, police said.
Police said someone called the
woman Monday night and said he had
found an identification card she had lost
earlier. The caller told her she could
pick up the card on the 1000 block of
State Street.
While she was walking on State St.,
two men jumped out of a white car,
which had been following her, threw
her to the ground and assaulted her, ac-
cording to police.
When the woman began to scream
and struggle, the two suspects fled to
the car, police said. A nearby resident
called the police after hearing screams.
Although there are no suspects in the
case, one of the men was described as
being in his early twenties, 5 feet 6 in-
ches tall, and having a moustache.
- Nancy Gottesman

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The attack of the killer housepets

LOS ANGELES (AP) - Cuddling a plague-infected cat
proved fatal for a South Lake Tahoe woman. A Los Angeles
man nearly died after being bitten by his supposedly non-
venoumous pet snake. And an Oregon girl was hospitalized
for a week with bubonic plague after she broke up a cat fight.
These cases were outlined in today's issue of the Journal of
the American Medical Association, which published an ac-
companying editorial headlined: "Caution: Pets May Be
Hazardous to Your Health."
"MOST AMERICAN households harbor one or more pets,"
wrote editorialist William Hubbert, a U.S. Department of
Agriculture veterinarian in Hyattsville, Md. "Each may
present certain infectious, physical or toxic hazards for the
human residents if not maintained and handled properly."
"We usually have frequent, intimate contact with these
common inhabitants of our domestic environment.

Therefore, we cannot afford to overlook their attendant
hazards."
The articles were intended "to alert physicians to things
they might not encounter every day but that might happen,"
said Jim Stacey, a spokesman for the AMA journal in
Chicago.
HUBBERT'S LIST of health hazards from pets included an
infection called toxoplasmosis and plague - like tularemia
from cats, rabies and plague from cats and dogs, tapeworm
- induced cysts from dogs, parasites from birds and frogs,
poisoning by snakes, and salmonella infection from turtles.
"Pets are a health hazard," said Dr. Willis Wingert, an
emergency pediatrician at County-USC Medical Center in
Los Angeles.

a

How to have class between classes.

1

I

11 : I

I

I

ATT ENTION!!!
ALL CALIFORNIA STUDENTS
CAN EITHER YOU OR YOUR PARENTS STILL
USE FINANCIAL AID THIS YEAR?

The CLAS*

loan program is now available to California

students and their parents. The program which

is

similar to the

Guaranteed

Student

Loan Program

(GSLP) allows parents to borrow up to $3,000 per year

to help with educational

costs. It is also available t

independent undergraduates and graduate students.
This program is made avail-
able through the California
Student Loan Authority.--~~~~~~~~~~~~ -~
FOR MORE INFORMATION SEND THIS CO
TO THE:
CALIFORNIA STUDENT LOAN AUTHOR
~ ~';.-'~ I41 f rqm ofNalli Room PO

o
)UPON
RITY

Indulge yourself in a warm cup of Cafe Vienna. It's a light and cin-
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from General Foods"i i
International Coffees.

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