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February 16, 1984 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-02-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

8
S
ti
W
4

Hockey
vs. Michigan Tech
Friday & Saturday
7:30 p.m., Yost Ice Arena

SPORTS
Thursday, February 16, 1984

Men's Basketball
vs. Illinois
Tonight, 8 p.m.
Crisler Arena

The Michigan Daily

}Page9

FULLBACK IS NINTH LEADING 'M' RUSHER
Shuttlesworth shifts into new gear

By TOM KEANEY
Not all of Michigan's football successes
"make it" in the pros. Not all of the
ones who make it even like it in the
pros. Some, like former Michigan
fullback Ed Shuttlesworth, are quite
well off being away from football.
Shuttlesworth, who spent two years
with the Toronto Argonauts of the
Canadian Football League, no longer
makes his living crashing through an
offensive line. Now he makes his money
with his brains, not his brawn.
HE STANDS 6-2, 225, but that frame is
put to work as a systems analyst for
Procter and Gamble in his hometown of
Cincinnati. Shuttlesworth says that being
an athlete at Michigan did not sentence
him to a life long "jock" image. "I was
at Michigan mostly to get my degree so
that I could have a careeer outside of
football. It (professional football) was
just a short term thing. People who
make it are basically lucky," said Shut-
tlesworth, -who ranks ninth on
Michigan's all-time career rushing list.
A history major at the University, he
accumulated some impressive
statistics in the three years he played,
1971, '72, and '73. He ran for a total of

2,348 yards, and scored 23 touchdowns.
SHUTTLESWORTH was a workhorse
running back. When Bo needed that ex-
tra push for a first down, or the last
Alum__ni
Updat e
yard in a touchdown drive, he usually
called for Shuttlesworth up the middle.
During his three playing years, the
Wolverines' record was 32-2-1. "I'd like
to see Bo beat that three-year record
now," Shuttlesworth said laughing.
But despite that record, Shuttleswor-
th only went to one bowl game - a 13-12
losing effort against Stanford in the
Rose Bowl his junior year. Michigan
went undefeated (10-0-1) his senior
year, but was not invited to a bowl
game.

"I GUESS we were just a little ahead
of our time. Nowadays we'd have all
kinds of offers with that kind of
record," he said referring to the recent
flood of bowl games.
After Michigan, Shuttlesworth was
drafted by the Baltimore Colts of the
NFL. Acting on advice from his agent,
however, he signed with Toronto
because it would mean more money
quickly.
Then came his two unmemorable
years in the CFL. "The CFL was second
rate after being at Michigan. We would
play for about 25,000 people as com-
pared to the 100,000 in Ann Arbor. I en-
joyed the city of Toronto, I liked
Canada, but the football was bad," he
recalled.
IT IS NO surprise then that he spent
those years in Toronto looking for his
chance to play in the NFL.
In 1976 Shuttlesworth tried out for the
Colts and the Philadelphia Eagles, but
it was not to be. When he was cut from
both those teams, Ed Shuttlesworth
quit football.
Now he does 'design work on com-
puter systems. A history major
designing computer systems? Does a

degree in history from Michigan
prepare someone well enough for a
career outside of football?
"IT DIDN'T prepare me for my
present job, but it let me let others
know that I could be trained," he
replied.
Furthermore, Shuttlesworth says
that his experience as a student-athlete
taught him self-discipline and
motivation.
He never anticipated a long career in
football, so it was these qualities that
carried him on to be successful after
football. A fast time in the 40 is impor-
tant to the average football player.
Shuttlesworth believes, however, that
football enabled him to learn the things
that have helped him throughout his
life.
The speed and the power weren't
enough to make him an NFL star. But
what if he had gone straight to the NFL
out of college? What if he had stuck with
football and played in Canada just
another year?
Ed Shuttlesworth said it best. "Hin-
dsight is 20-20." He's happy where he is
now.

-Sports information photo
Former Wolverine great Ed Shuttlesworth takes a handoff from quarter-
back Tom Slade in 1973 action. After a brief career in professional football,
Shuttlesworth is making a name outside of sports.

SPOR TS OF THE DAILY:
Gophers nip Badgers

"y, . , :,

*MADISON (UPI) - Roland Brooks'
jump shot as time expired last night
gave the University of Minnesota a
come-from-behind 68-67 victory over
Wisconsin, the Badgers seventh
straight Big Ten loss.
Tommy Davis scored 19 points to lead
the Gophers, now 13-8 overall and 5-7 in.
the Big Ten. Marc Wilson added 14 for
Minnesota and Brooks finished with 10.
Cory Blackwell, the Big Ten's leading
scorer, led the Badgers with 22 points.
Scott Roth and Rick Olsen both had 15
points for Wisconsin, now 7-14 overall
and 3-9 in the Big Ten.
Four free throws by Olson gave
Wisconsin a 64-58 lead with 1:07
remaining but Wilson's jump shot
brought the Gophers to within four at
64-60. Wisconsin still led 67-64 when
Blackwell missed a wide open layup
with 26 seconds remaining.
Wilson's jumper with 15 seconds left
brought Minnesota to within one at 67-
6. The Badgers then fumbled the in-
lounds pass out of bounds with 11
seconds left and after a Gopher
ttmeout, Minnesota worked the ball to

Brooks who released his jumper as
time ran out.
Blues 4, Red Wings .3
DETROIT (UPI) - Brian Sutter and
Joe Mullen scored power play goals
mid way through the second period to
snap a 2.2 tie and defenseman. Dave
Pichette, playing his first game since
coming to St. Louis in a trade with
Quebec, had four assists to lead the
Blues to a 4-3 victory over the Detroit
Red Wings.
Sutter deflected a shpt by Rob
Ramage while the Blues had a two man
advantage at 9:58 and Mullen slipped
behind the Detroit defense and beat
goalie Corrado Micalef at 13:30 to give
the Blues a 4-2 lead.
Detroit's Ivan Boldirev cut the
margin to 1 with a power play goal with
2:02 remaining in the second period.
The win was the first in four games
for St. Louis, which is second in the
Norris Division.
Detroit, which remains in last place
in the Norris Division, suffered its first
loss in four outings.

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