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February 14, 1984 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 1984-02-14

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0

Page 10 - The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, February 14, 1984
OLYMPIC UPDATE
Skier yanks first U.S. gold medal

6'- F

full court
PRESS

(From the Associated Press)
SARAJEVO, Yugoslavia -
Unheralded Debbie Armstrong, a bub-
bly 20-year-old relatively new to inter-
national competition, gave the medal-
hungry United States team its first gold
medal of the XIV Winter Olympics
yesterday as she outdueled teammate
Christin Cooper in the women's giant
slalom.
Armstrong, who had never finished
higher than third place in any World
Cup race, passed Cooper on the second
run to give the United States its first
Alpine gold medal in 12 years and its
first in the giant slalom in 30 years.
AMERICAN TAMARA McKinney,
eighth after the first run, clocked the
fastest second run, a 1:11.72, but
finished out of the medal race in fourth
place with a combined time of 2:21.83.
The 1-2-4 placing of Armstrong,
Cooper and McKinney was the best
showing by an American team in any
Olympic Alpine event.
Hockey
USA 7, Austria 3
Center Pat LaFontaine scored three
goals as the United States hockey team,
already eliminated from medal com-
petition, defeated Austria 7-3 last night
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for its first victory in the Olympic
hockey tournament.
LaFontaine opened the scoring 12:04
into the game. David Jensen gave the
Americans a 2-0 lead 1:08 later.
Austria, 0-4, rallied to tie the game on
goals by Johann Fritz, at 18:32 of the
first period, and Eddy Lebler, 3:54 into
the second period.
But the United States, now 1-2-1, took
a 4-2 lead on LaFontaine's second goal
of the night at 3:42 and Jensen's second
just 11 seconds later.
The Austrians cut the deficit to one on
a goal by Richard Cunningham, but the
United States broke it open on LaFon-
taine's third and single goals by
Thomas Hirsch and Scott Fusco.
Soviet Union 6,
West Germany 1

at the Winter Olympics with an 8-1 rout
of Norway.
By the time Gagner began his
scoring, the Canadians had a 3-0 lead on
first period goals by Russ Courtnall and
Darren Lowe and a second-period score
by Pat Flatley.
Czechoslovakia 7, Finland 2
Frantisek Cernik scored twice in the
first period last night _to lead
Czechoslovakia to a 7-2 Olympic hockey
victory over Finland that assured a
spot in the medals round for the Czechs.
Figure skating
Scott Hamilton, America's main man
for a figure skating gold medal, traced
the best figure eights in compulsories
yesterday to take the competion lead.
"Yahooo. I've been second all the

time, always second, second, second,"
Hamilton crowed after winning all
three compulsory figures - something
he has never done in international com-
petition. "I guess it sets me up pretty
good."
Cross country skiing
Gunde Svan of Sweden skied to a gold
medal yesterday when he outlegged
two Finns in the men's 15- kilometer
cross country race.
Svan, 22, skied the sunsplashed cour-
se in 41 minutes, 25.6 seconds in out-
dueling Finland's Aki Karvonen and
Harri Kirvesniemi. Karvonen won the
silver medal with a time of 41:34.9 and
Kirvesniemi the bronze in 41 :45.6.
Dan Simoneau of Eugene, Ore., was
the top American, finishing in 18th in
43:03.4.

A
_ - __

Cage rs'

play smolders ..

.. until enthusiasm flares
By RANDY BERGER
W HILE WATCHING Michigan's 71-61 triumph over Michigan State last
Saturday it became clear to me why the team struggled through the
first half of the Big Ten season.
No, it wasn't because of Leslie Rockymore's horrendous shooting,
although he has given a new definition to his nickname, ethe Rock,' for the
countless bricks he's thrown up. Nor was it because of the team's inex-
perience. That alibi is hardly justified when you look at first place Illinois
which starts three sophomores.
The problem with the Wolverines didn't have to do with talent or experien-
ce but with lack of intensity. I honestly believe that the reason Michigan lost
the close games at Purdue and Illinois was because they didn't want them as
much. The team seemed to lack any motivation or emotion. There were no
high fives, no diving after loose balls, things, you see in teams that can pull
off wings in the last seconds.
Not with talent alone
It's been proven that you don't need great talent to win in the Big Ten this
year. With the exception of Efrem Winters and Steve Alford, neither Illinois,
Purdue nor Indiana have any pro prospects. The most important thing you
need in order to obtain success in the this league is players who beleive they
can win and will do anything within their capabilities to win.
But just as I was about to label the Michigan players as a bunch of
comatose underachievers, they finally showed some spark last Saturday. I
mean players were actually slapping each other on the back and playing
with fire in their eyes. Another barometer for measuring intensity is free
throws and the team finaly made them, hitting 21 of 25 against the Spartans.
Responsiblity for lack of motivation in the past has to fall partly on coach
Bill Frieder's shoulders. After all, it's up to the coach to make sure his team
is ready and motivated to play. While no one questions Frieder's basketball
knowledge, his motivation skills are suspect. Frieder is not a screaming,
wild maniac like Bobby Knight.
Well, that was until last week when Frieder kicked his team out of prac-
tice.
"He was upset that we weren't practicing like he thought we could," said
forward Richard Rellford. "We came back the next day and everybody was
enthused and we then had two great days of practice."
And last Saturday it was evident that Frieder's butt-kicking payed off as
the team, especially Rellford, played with some gusto.
Rellford resurges
Rellford is sort of a microcosm of the team's problem. He has all the tools
to be a great player - a good touch; agility and quickness - but lacks
aggressiveness. That problem can be solved by pushing the player in prac-
tice until he gets mad.
Well, Rellford got mad Saturday against State. Just ask Scott Skiles who
saw his fastbreak layup smashed into the third row by the flying Floridian.
Rellford also hit five of six from the field, including a spectacular reverse
dunk to end the game, and was a perfect two for two from the line.
Rellford's metamorphosis into a more aggressive player is proof of what
the team needs to win in the Big Ten. If the Wolverines can show the spark
and fire that enabled them to beat State, they'll definitely improve in the Big
Ten race and reach the NCAA tournament. However, Frieder has to stoke
the fire, or the Wolverines are liable to get burned.

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Spartans
sneak by
Iloopsters

By STEVE WISE '
Orethia Lilly's layup had cut the Spartan lead to just two,
68-66, with 26 seconds left on the clock. With a little more than
10 seconds remaining, Wolverine guard Lori Gnatkowski put
Michigan State's Kris Emerson on the line shooting one and
one.>
Emerson missed and Gnatkowski grabbed the rebound
along with an opportunity to make up for the foul and tie the
game.
AN OFF-BALANCE Gnatkowski didn't make the shot;
the Wolverines didn't pull off an upset; and Michigan, now 0-
10 in the Big Ten and 2-16 overall, didn't break it's 10-game

losing streak.
The win Sunday extended the Spartan's streak in the op-
posite direction, with the last two of MSU's five straight wins
coming at Wolverine expense.
In all fairness, though, the Wolverines improved
significantly from last week's 76-63 loss to the Spartans.
Michigan kept the game close throughout, making up ten and
eight point deficits in the second half.
"WE STARTED UP quickly and kept it going," said
Wolverine forward Wendy Bradetich, whose 20 points tied
her for leading scorer. "That's something we didn't do much
in the past."

41

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MSU chews two Blue crews

0

By SUSAN WARNER
Despite Michigan women's gymnastic
coach Sheri Hyatt's claim that her
team came "nowhere close to its poten-
tial," the Wolverines did well against
highly regarded Michigan State in East
Lansing on Sunday, but lost 175.70-
171.70.
Michigan State's depth makes them a
very strong team. Five MSU women
took four firsts and five seconds. Said
Hyatt, "MSU looks good. They're
probably one of the top two teams in the
nation."

BUT THE WOLVERINES' own per-
formance also "looked good". Dayna
Samuelson took second on the vault
with an 8.9, freshman Heidi Cohen
placed third on the balance beam and
sixth in the floor exercise and Kathy
Beckwith took fourth in both the uneven
parallel bars and the floor exercise.
Beckwith also won the balance beam
with 9.0 and she captured second place
in the all-around with a total score of
35.40, trailing the first-place Linda
Schmauder of MSU by only .25 points.
High school All-America Caren Deaver

gave another great performance for the
Michigan tumblers. She had an in-
credible floor routine that gave her a
personal best of 8.75.
Though happy with her teams second-
highest overall score of the season,
Hyatt said the team still needed to im-
prove. The coach felt the team lost two-
and-a-half points because of its
unusually poor performance on the
uneven parallel bars. Also, the
Wolverines were trying new moves on
the vault and floor exercise, which
resulted in lower scores than usual.
Men too
The Michigan men's gymnastics
team lost in a close meet to Michigan
State, Sunday. The Spartans had a total
of 264.25 points while Michigan finished
with 262.85.
Senior Merrick Horn led Michigan in

several events with Gavin Meyerowitz
and Brock Orwig also giving im-
pressive performances. Horn brought
in three first places with a 9.50 on the
floor exercise, a 9.15 on the parallel
bars and in the all-around competition
he tallied a 54.30. In the vault, the only
area that gave him difficulty, Horn
finished fourth with a 9.10.
MICHIGAN STATE'S experience
proved to be a little too tough for the
youthful Wolverine squad. Spartan
senior Bruce Traver displayed his
team-leading talent, winning in the
pommel horse with an outstanding 9.8.
Meyerowitz found it impossible to
match Traver, settling for second place
on that event with a 9.15. Meyerowitz
also finished second behind teammate
Horn in the all-around event, scoring
53.8 high bar routine.

4

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o CNANG-r&;'NOBoD( FOR. PRESIDT 4r-
"'SURVIVAL wt1rt A SNSE o0F HUMCJ( '

go

-'SUSAN BROSER

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