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February 14, 1984 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-02-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Dependen
By CAREY ZEISER
April 15 is getting closer, and many students feel
they are up to their ears in tax forms.
Some believe they can reap more benefits if they
declare themselves financially independent, but
many students are not aware that dependent students
are also eligible for some benefits. Tax credits are
one example.
"MANY STUDENTS qualify for (tax credits) and
don't even know it," said Debi Hunt, H & R Block
Public Information Coordinator.
Tax credits, especially rent, home heating, and
property tax credits, are available to students who
live off-campus, said Doug Graham, a volunteer tax
advisor for VITA, a free tax help program sponsored
by Project Community and the Internal Revenue
Service.
Tlhese credits could reduce the amount of income
tax students have to pay, said Graham, an LSA
junior, and students who are either intimidated by
the tax process itself or feel there are no benefits in
ctfi er them man he missing mot on an easv profit.

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday. February 14, 1984 - Page 5
ts can get tax breaks

VITA TAX advisor John Borradel stressed that
students do not have to be financially independent to
receive tax credits.
Although only financially independent students are
eligible for home heating credit, Borradel said that
bdth independent and dependent students may
qualify to receive property tax credit "worth a decent
amount of money."
The best way to win tax benefits is to understand
the basics of the tax system and to play by the rules,
said Kathy Konno, another VITA volunteer.
SOME STUDENTS unlawfully declare financial
independence to earn tax breaks or get University
financial aid, said Graham.
Other students whose parents live outside of the
state unlawfully try to declare themselves indepen-
dent in order to reduce their tuition bills by claiming
Michigan residency, added Graham.
According to the IRS, people are dependent on
another source of income if they:
" Obtain 50 percent of their financial support from

"haarea member of that household;
" are citizens of the United States; e
" have not filed a joint return with a different sour-
ce; and
" have a yearly income of no more than $1,000 (ex-
cept students and anyone under 19 years).
Students who lie about financial independence 11
have a hard time remaining undiscovered, Graf m
said. He said the IRS is becoming more computerized
and can compare student tax forms with their paren-
ts' forms to confirm independent status.
And, he added, "Even if the government doesn't
catch you, the University will."
LYNN BORSET, assistant director of the Univer-
sity's Office of Financial Aid said the office "has been
looking at self-supporting status more carefully"
when reviewing applications for aid.
Borset estimated that about 10 to 15 percent of ail
applicants were caught lying about their independent
status. She added, however, that she doesn't see this
as a rising trend.

I SWiC LUi UIVALi 111C1y r~G 1111s' OIA15 Vua. V11 "&a VfiN ] i!a

Daily Photo by SCOTT ZOLTON
I scream
Passersby yesterday look into the Caffe Fiore, a new ice cream parlor on
State Street.
Icreases in dorm*
fees recommended

(Continued from Page 1)
submitted by the rate study committee
will be absorbed by a decrease in the
funds to the General Student Residence
Reserve. The GSRR is the fund that the
housing division uses to pay for major
projects and renovations. Foulke said
that the funds from the non-traditional
halls will not be expected to support the
GSRR as they have in the past.
The recommended hike of 3 per-
cent for non-traditional housing is a
reaction to the increased competition
for off-campus housing, the report said.
The proposed rate hike is relatively low
t4 low the University to remain com-
petitive with off-campus housing.
The5.8 percent increase in the rates
for family housing is primarily due to
the increase in utilities within family
housing.
Foulke said that "5.1 percent of the
recommended 5.8 percent increase is

just to cover utilities."
Foulke added that the cost of utilities
is not as high in the residence halls, so
the rate increase there could be lower.
the main reason for increasing fees
cited by the original committee that
studied rates was an increase of 2.2
percent for labor and equipment.
* ~
Z ".94, .
1 Z.,. i an

Farmhands
to sue for
damages
(Continued from Page)
BARTNICKI SAID he will seek
damages from the Kozminskis for
violating the minimum wage law, in-
voluntary servitude, assault and bat-
tery, (absence of) workmen's compen--
sation, and mental distress.
"We will probably ask for a different
amount in each count," Bartnicki said.
"Lost wages alone might amount to $1
million."
Because the Kozminskis were
already convicted of involuntary ser-
vitude, Bartnicki predicted his case
could go to court within a couple of
months, considerably quicker than the
usual two-year period it takes to try
these types of cases, he said.
BEFORE ANY damages can be
awarded, the Kozminski's resources
have to be determined. "It seems that
they have resources," Bartnicki said.
"They've been sued before and have
already testified under oath (about
their financial resources). They own
three farms; I believe they are of
means," Bartnicki said.
Although there have been 10 cases
similar to this one in the United States,
Bartnicki said that this is the first one
in Michigan and that most of the others
dealt with migrant workers.
Bartnicki said Fulmer and Molitoris,
currently living in a foster care home
run by the Michigan Department of
Social Services, have been told about
'he suit and are "pretty wel aware" of
what is going on.
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MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO: THE MICHIGAN DAILY
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SUPPLEMENT WILL APPEAR SATURDAY, MARCH 24 down.)
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