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February 14, 1984 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-02-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Jackson gets invitation

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o visit Nicaragua
FORSYTH, 'Ga. (AP) - The Rev, the United States.'
Jesse Jackson said yesterday he has Asked whether the timing had
ben invited to Nicaragua next Tuesday political overtones, the Democratic
Lothelp celebrate the rise to power of the presidential candidate told reporters
leftist Sandinista regime there and will traveling with him on a voter
dlecide by the end of the week whether registration sweep through Georgia, "I
to'go. didn't invite me to go to Nicaragua."
If he goes, the visit would come one When asked if a visit would make it _.
lay after the Iowa caucuses and exac- appear he was backing the Sandinista F
tly a week in advance of the New Ham- government, Jackson said, "no more
pshire primary, where Jackson is than Vice President George Bush going
pushing for a strong showing. to Russia and linking him with the
JACKSON said the invitation came Communist government."J
from the Nicaraguan ambassador to ackson
...won't back Sandinistas
APPENINGS14U' rules

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, February 14, 1984 -Page 3
GEO waites to see if
Will renegotiate contract

Highlight
Wavy Gravy, the '60s symbol of activism who emceed the Woodstock
Festival, will promote his "Nobody for President" campaign tonight at 7:30
in the Pendleton Room of the Michigan Union.
Films
MED - The Taming of the Shrew, 7 p.m., Romeo and Juliet, 9:15 p.m.,
MLB3.
CFT - Don't Look Back, 7 & 9 p.m., Michigan Theater.
AAFC - The Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, 7 p.m., The Exterminating
Angel, 8:45 p.m., Angell Aud. A.
Housing - Harriet Tubman & the Underground Railroad, 10 p.m., Nikki
Giovanni Lounge..
American Society of Interior Design - Beyond Utopia: Changing At-
titudes in American Architecture, 7 p.m., Art and Architecture Building.
Performances
School of Music - Univ. Philharmonia/Concerto competition winners, 8
p.m., Hill Aud.
Performance Network - Tom Adair, video tapes, 8 p.m., the Performan-
ce Network.
Union Arts Poetry Series - Laura Roop, 12:15 p.m., Kuenzel Room,
Union.
Speakers
Bioengineering - Otto Prohaska, "Miniature Multiple Electode Probes &
Their Application in Brain Research," 4 p.m., Room 1042, East Engineering.
Afroamerican & African Studies - Robert Hill, "Is There Really a Crisis
in the Black Family?" 7:30 p.m., Schorling Aud.
Psychobiology - Robert Payne, "Bird Song Dialdects: A Comparison of
Population Biology, Life Styles, & Recognition Strategies in Three Songbir-
ds, 12:30 p.m., 1057 MHRI
Christian Medical Society - Jane Krumlauf, "Spiritual Dimensions of
Health Care: An Interdisciplinary Approach," 7 p.m., University Church of.
the Nazerne.
Chemistry - Steven Goates, "'Busting' bonds & other Photo-Delights," 4
p.m., Room 1300, Chemistry Building.
Ecumenical Campus Center - Antony Sullivan, "Lebanon in the Contem-
porary Middle East,"12 p.m. International Center.N
Human Growth & Development - "Strategies for Repairing Perinatal
Brain Damage," 12 p.m., Room 1300, N. Ingalls Building.
Museum of Art - Barbara Krause, "Northern Renaissance Style," 12:10
p.m., Museum of Art.:
Computing Center - CC Consulting Staff, "MTS File Editor," 12:10 p.m.,
Room 1011, NUBS. Forrest Hartman, "Intro to Edit Procedures," 3:30 p.m.,
room 165, Business Administration Building.
Michigan Alliance for Disarmament - Michio Kaku, "U.S. First Strike
War Plans," 7:30 p.m., Rackham Amphitheater.
Eclipse Jazz - David Wild, "Miles Davis," 7:30 p.m., WUOM-FM.
Human Resource Development - "Career Management for Office Staff:
Looking to the Future," 1 p.m., Room 130, LSA Building.
Clemnents Library - Janice & Daniel Longone, "American Cookbooks &
Wine Books, 1797 to 1950,3 p.m., Clements Library.
Students for Origins Research - Jerry Bergman, creation, evolution con-
troversy, 7:30 p.m., Room 2443, Mason Hall.
Center for Chinese Studies - Janet Salaff, "Making Fewer Chinese: Birth
Control Programs in Singapore and the People's Republic of China," 12
p.m., Lane Hall.
Rudolf.Steiner Institute - E. Katz, "Effects of the Great Period of Earth
Evolution on Human Nature Today," 8p.m., Rudolf Steiner Library.
Ann Arbor Public Library - Kenn Miller, Ann Arbor author, 12:10 p.m.,
Ann Arbor Public Library.
Statistics Dept. - Andrew Jonas, "Modeling Economics Time Series - A
Frequency Domain Approach," 4 p.m., Room 1443, Mason Hall.
Meetings
CEW - Jo Hunt Club, 12 p.m., 350 S. Thayer.
Ann Arbor Go Club -7 p.m., Room 1433, Mason Hall.
His House Christian Fellowship - 7:30 p.m., 925 E. Ann Street.
UM Fencing Club - 8p.m., Coliseum.
Lesbian Network - 7:30 p.m., Guild House.
Ann Arbor NOW Chapter - 7:30 p.m., 1917 Washtenaw Ave.
Endometriosis Association - 7 p.m., Community Room, Maple Health
Building, 501 N. Maple Road.
Michigan Student Assembly - Financial Aid, Tuition, Legislative
Relations Committees, 6:30 p.m., MSA Chambers, Union. For more infor-
mation call 763-3241.
Miscellaneous
UAC -Impact Jazz Dance Workshop, 7 p.m., Union Ballroom.
Educational Policy, Planning, and Administration -panel discussion,
"Do Reform Efforts Improve School Learning?" 7 p.m., East Conference
Room, Rackham.
Michigan Rugby - Benefit Bash, Ricks.
Measles Vaccinations - Lawyers Club, Fletcher Hall.

out four
possible
measles
eases.
By ALLISON ZOUSMER
Four of six suspected cases of
measles turned out to be false alarms
this week, health service officials said
yesterday.
After observing the patients over the
weekend, doctors determined that in
four of the cases, measles symptoms
did not show up. The two other cases
need further observation, doctors said.
Health Service officials started a
massive measles vaccination drive on
campus nearly two weeks ago after two
cases of the virus were discovered in
Markley dormitory. Since that time
there have been no other confirmed
cases of the disease.
Officials are continuing the vac-
cination drive at Health Services and
several other locations on campus this
week, officials are encouraging all
students born between 1957 and 1967 to
receive shots or confirm that they have
had an effective vaccination.

By THOMAS MILLER
Representatives of the Graduate
Employees' Organization will meet-
with University officials tomorrow in
an attempt to re-open contract
negotiations to abolish tuition for
graduate teaching assistants.
Last Thursday the union decided to
ask the University to renegotiate the
contract because a federal law exem-
pting teaching assistants from certain
taxes expired Dec. 31. GEO's current
contract with the University was
ratified only three months ago.
UNDER THE current contract, with
the University, TAs pay only two-thirds
of their tuition. The one-third discount
is exempt from taxes. This December,
however, Congress adjourned without
renewing the law which would have
given them the tax break.
As a result, TAs have seen their taxes
rise about $75 to $100 per month..
Last week GEO decided to ask the
University to renogotiate the contract
on ground that the contract terms have
changed. 'They are asking for a full
tuition break because it is the only way
to guarantee that their paychecks will
keep pace with tuition hikes, members
of the union said.
"THE REAL ISSUE is not the taxes,"
said Stepen Grossbart, a member of the
GEO steering committee. The un-
derlying problems would still remain
even if a solution were found (to the
taxes)."
"The (tax) issues brings the point
home. It wipes out the pay increase
(from the new contract)," he said. "We
sat down to figure out 'How could we
guarantee students the same
paycheck?' And we came to the con-
clusion that this is silly. We're paying
tuition."
Grossbart said that exemption
graduate students from tuition is a
common practice. Many schools across
the country offer similar plans, he said.
Union members are now waiting to

see if the University agrees to re-open
the talks.
COLLEEN DOLAN-GREENE, THE
University's chief negotiator for the
GEO contract, says the University has
yet to decide whether they will reopen
contract talks.
"We will first have to meet with GEO
and discuss the problem," Dolan-
Greene said.
She says that the talks could be
reopened, but the final decision will be
based on recommendations from her
and the GEO advisory board, a Univer-
sity committee which deals with GEO.

GEO vice president Jane Holzka says
that GEO isn't really sure how the
University will react. Holzka declined
comment on what action GEO might
take if the University refuses -to
negotiate because she said the decision
rests with all union members.
Though the proposal may seem
drastic, GEO members insist that the
move was inevitable. According ..to
Stephen Grossbart, a member of the
GEO steering committee, the union
historically has fought for a total tuition
break.

TUESDAY LUNCH DISCUSSION
February 14, 1984 - 12 Noon

"LEBANON'S FUTURE AND AMERICAN PERSPECTIVE"
Speaker: Dr. Antony Sullivan

N

At the International Center
603 E. Madison Street

For Additional Information
please phone 662-5529

Sponsored by
THE ECUMENJCAL CAMPUS CENTER THE INTERNATIONAL CENTER
CHURCH WOMEN UNITED IN ANN ARBOR

barr Y bagel's placek
WESTGATE SHOPPING CENTER
Available at three campus locations:

Q- -1

-Marshall's
-Blue Front
-Tice's

°t

_____~HEA1?DELIgh'I
- 'Hair Styling 8aloninl
is the Campus inn 615 E. Huron
open monday-SatLuiday 9-5 " evenings by appoint.769-6280
SPECIALS Thru February -
PERMS - $35 plus haircut
Cut/Blow dry - $1200

2 FREE BAGELS
WITH PURCHASE OF TWO BAGELS AT REGULAR PRICE
EXPIRES 2/20/84
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PILOT PRECSE ROLLNG BALL PENS.
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To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109
Malicious Intent
] a

NO CMUAN BAND
CAN MAKE YOU THIS OFFER.

If you're a musician who's serious
about performing, you should take a
serious look at the Army.
Army bands offer you an average
of 40 performances a month. In every-
thing from concerts to parades.
Army bands also offer you a
chance to travel.

The Army has bands performing
in Japan, Hawaii, Europe and all
across America.
And Army bands offer you the
chance to play with good musicians. Just
to qualify, you have to be able to sight-
read music you've never seen before and
demonstrate several other musical skills.

It's a genuine, right-now, imme-
diate opportunity.
Compare it to your civilian offers.
Then write: Army Opportunities, P.O.
Box 300, North Hollywood, CA 91603.
ARMY BAN.
BE ALLYOU CAN BE.

'l

MEe CoL0 V

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