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February 03, 1984 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-02-03

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, February 3, 1984 - page 3

Ann Arborites are
unique, Bullard says

Johnson opens
minority festival

By SUSAN ANGEL
'Everyone in Ann Arbor is weird
because they get their "information
from newspapers instead of
television," state representative Perry
Bullard told a group of four students at
Markley Dormitory last night.
Bullard, an Ann Arbor Democrat who
is up for re-election this year, called
Washtenaw County's low unem-
ployment and political savvy "an
island of a good-thing," compared to the
rest of the nation.
HE CONTRASTED Ann Arbor voters
to the average voter who is fooled by
President Reagan's "patriotic and rosy
picture" of national affairs.
"It's a whole different level of
ignorance in the White House now,"
Bullard said. "We're in an ideological
wonderland and it's dangerous.
'Bullard said last October's Grenada'
invasion can be attributed to Reagan's
simplistic world view which sees com-
munism lurking behind every
development in world affairs.
OVER THE - NEXT few weeks,

Bullard will be visiting with students to
try to determine what students' con-
cerns are and to lobby for presidential
candidate Walter Mondale.
Bullard said Michigan will be
unable to make significant headway on
its 12 percent unemployment rate
without a more sympathetic gover-
nment in Washington.
"We need a new government in
Washington or else we're stuck with
boot-strapping in Michigan," he said.
In response to a question about
whether Jesse Jackson might take
away some of Mondale's votes, Bullard
said:
"Jesse Jackson has no chance to win
the presidency or to get the Democratic
nomination. I hope he understands that
unless he can pull a lot of support for
the Democratic party, it's all rhetoric
with no long-term significance.''
At the end of his talk, Bullard joked
that he should go to the T.V. room
where the Michigan-Michigan State
basketball game was playing, in order
to reach more students.

By ALLISON ZOUSMER
Vice President for Student Service
Henry Johnson kicked off the Minority
Arts and Cultural Festival last night by
urging black students to "be greedy'
and take all you can from this place"
educationally and culturally.
Johnson, speaking to 60 faculty and
students at East Quad, said "the dream
is still alive, if not completely
well...(and) the manifestation is you."
THE FESTIVAL, now in its 10th year,
is sponsored by the East Quad Minority
Council to commemorate Black History
Month.
Although Johnson did not speak
specifically about racial problems at
the University, he said black students
have to "work doubly hard to conquer
past barriers and current ones."
Johnson urged students to continue to
pursue Martin Luther King's dream
that black people will be judged on their
abilities,,not on their color, but he said
the tactics of the '80s are different from
those used in the past.

"THE RHETORIC of the '60s and '70s
doesn't cut it today," he said. Johnson
said blacks must "lead with their
brains, not the gut."
He said blacks can make a dent in
their problems by working for can-
didates and voting in November's elec-
tions. He urged the audience to refuse
to accept "a pattern of being used to
abuse," and declared that blacks have
an obligation to work toward the
solution of society's problems.
Naveena Daniels, an LSA sophomore
who is coordinator of the minority
council, said last night'sceremony
drew the largest attendance in the
festival's 10-year history.
The festival offers a number of events
continuing through Sunday. Tomorrow
night there will be a Gospel Concert at
7:30 p.m. in Rackham Auditorium;
Saturday there will be a workshop on
solving minority educational problems
and an art exhibit; and on Sunday,
School of Music and Dance students will
perform a classical recital.

HAPPENINGS-
Highlight
Director of the Michigan Civil Liberties Union Howard Simon will speak
on "Civil Liberties in Reagan's America," today at noon at 802 Monroe
*Street.
Films
Alternative Action - Poltergeist, 7 & 9:15p.m., MLB 4.
CFT - Freaks, 7 & 9 p.m., Eraserhead, 8:45 p.m. & Midnight, Michigan
Theatre.
AAFC - Brimstone and Treacle - 7, 8:40 p.m., & 10:20 p.m., Nat. Sci.
Aud.
Cinema Two - The Tin Drum, 7 & 9:30 p.m., Aud. A.
Cinema Guild - Monty Python's Meaning of Life, 7 & 9 p.m., Lorch
Arch. & Urban Planning - Dreams & Awakenings, 12:15 p.m., Art & Arch.
Aud.
Performances
PTP - Butley, 8p.m., Mendelssohn Theatre.
Ark - Billy Novick & Guy Van Duser, guitar concert, doors open at 7:30
p.m., 1421 Hill St.
ABENG - 10th Annual Minority Arts & Cultural Festival, Gospel Concert,
7:30 p.m., Rackham Aud.
Readers' Theatre Guild - Readings from Updike, Poe, Douglas, Adams,
Lewis, and Carrol, 8 p.m., Anderson Rm. D, Michigan Union.
School of Music - Cello Recital, Karen Krummel, 8:30 p.m., Art & Arch.
Aud.
Speakers
Center for South and Southeast Asian Studies - "Export of Labor in
Southeast Asia: Entrepreneurship or Exploitation?" L.A. Peter Gosling,
noon, Lane Hall Commons Room.
Natural Resources - Norton Distinguished Visitor Series, "Long Term
Timber Supply - A Global Perspective," Rober Sedjo, 3 p.m. Rm. 1040 Dana
Bldg.
Astro Fest - "Space Shuttle: First Report on Spacelab 1," Jim London,
7:30 p.m., MLB 3.
Rackham - "Musical Memories: Laughter & Tears from Bygone Years,"
Judith & Conrad Conakowski, 8 p.m., Clements Library.
Industrial and Operations Engineering - "Real Time Decision Support
for Flexible Manufacturing," Cynthia Whitney, 3 p.m., 241 IOE Bldg.
Nuclear Engineering - "Probabalistic Risk Assessment," John Bickel,
3:45 p.m., White Aud.
Meetings
Ann Arbor Chinese Bible Class -7:30 p.m., University Reformed Church.
Korean Christian Fellowship, - 9 p.m., Campus Chapel.
Chinese Students Christian Fellowship - 7:30 p.m., 730 Tappan.
Bridge Club --7:15 p.m., League.
Miscellaneous
Tae Kwon Do Club - Practice, 5 p.m., CCRB Martial Arts Rm.
Muslim Students Association - Discussion on events in Muslim world, 9
p.m., 407 N. Ingalls.
Alpha Chi Sigma - Happy Hour, 4:45 p.m., Rick's American Cafe.
Museum of Art - Art Break, "Comparison: Adoration of Kings & the
Marriage of St. Catherine," 12:10 p.m., Museum of Art.
Men's Swimming - Michigan vs. Iowa, 7:30 p.m., Matt Mann Pool.
Michigan Gay Undergraduates - Annual MGU Bar Run, for info. call 761-
3051.
International Folk Dance Club - Workshop on Balkan Dances, 8 p.m., An-
derson Rm., Union.
Artists & Craftsmen Guild - "Artists' Business & Marketing Seminar, all
day, Kuenzel Rm., Union.
Continuing Medical Education - Midwinter Family Practice, Boyne
Highlands, for
WCBN - Newsprogram, 5:30 p.m., 88.3 FM.
To submit items for the Happenings 'Column, send them in care of
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109
Malicious Intent

Daily Photo by TOD WOOLF
Henry.Johnson, University Vice President for Student Services urges black
students to get the most out of the University at East Quad's Minority
Festival last night.
Klanman sentenced to

death inAla.
MOBILE, Ala. (AP) - A circuit judge, in prisor
breaking Alabama precedent, Donal
overruled his jury yesterday and sen- gone out
tenced a Ku Klux Klansman to death in was bea
the electric chair for killing a young a neigh
black man and hanging the body from brought
a camphor tree. scraggly
Judge Braxton Kittrell set an April 30 Hays' ap
execution date for Henry Francis Hays,
who according to testimony killed ,19-
year-old Michael Donald at randomtto
show Klan strepgth in Alabama."
HAYS repeatedly denied the killing.
Appeal of a death sentence is automatic
and such dates are routinely set aside.
'District Attorney Chris Galanos had
called the case a "crime of racial YOU
hatred" and urged Kittrez to impose the FINA
death penalty despite conflicting FASTAND
Alabama case law. f
A jury of 11 whites and one black con-
victed Hays of capital murder on Dec. K
0 and recommended a sentence of life
aas REA TSN

killing

n without possibility of parole.
d, a brick masonry student, had
that night to buy cigarettes. He
ten and strangled with a rope in
boring county ; his body was
back to Mobile and hanged in a
y tree across the street from
partment.
~OW4
CAN LEARN BOTH!
VLY A SPEED READING PROGRAM THAT CUTS YOUR
ME WITHOUT SACR I ICING COMPREHENSION OR RECALL'
SMART ... ISN T THAT HOW YOU WANT TO READ?
3' ]Q BREAKTHROUGH RAPID READING
1 .Call Days, Evenings or Weekends for Deals
NPIAN (313) 662-3149
NTER A 211 East Huron Street
I SPECOAUSTSSIWNC ANN ARBOR, MI 48104

TAKE THE LEAD
Help New Students Discover
the Diversity of Michigan
BEA FALL
ORIENTA TION.
LEADER
Pick up applications at the Orientation Office
(3000 Michigan Union) or
call 764-6290 for further information.
*"on affirmative action non-discriminotory employer "
APPLICATIONS DUE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17

Sooner Or Later
You'll Get lResponsibility Like Tis.
In The Navy It's Sooner.

fr. I%
ws -

You're maneuvering
445 feet of guided
missile frigate through

the navigational
hazards and non-stop
traffic of one of the
world's busiest ports.
But you'll dock
safely. Because you
know your equipment.
You know your men. And even when the
responsibility weighs in at 3,600 tons...
you're ready.
After four years of college, you're
ready for more responsibility than most
civilian jobs offer. Navy officers get the
kind of job and responsibility they want,
and they get it sooner.
Navy officers are part of the manage-
ment team after 16 weeks. Instead of boot'

r.. .' .

ment experience that
could take years in
private industry. And
they earn the decision-
making authority it
takes to make that
responsibility pay.off.
As their manage-
ment abilities grow,
Navy officers can take

advantage of advanced education and
training in fields as varied as operations
management, electronics, and systems
analysis. In graduate school it would cost
you thousands; in the Navy we pay you.
And the Navy pays well. The start-
ing salary is $17,000 (more than most
companies pay). And that's on top of a
comprehensive benefits program that
can include special duty pay. After four

4
4

' . /
K

I

camp, officer candidates
receive four months
of leadership training.
It's professional school-
ing designed to sharpen
their technical and
management skills.
Then, in their first
assignment, Navy
officers get manage-

NAVY OPPORTUNITY W 344
INFORMATION CENTER
P.O. Box 5000, Clifton, NJ 07015
Q I'd rather have responsibility sooner. Tll me
I more about the Navy's officer program. (OG)
Namew
N m First (Please Print) Last
Address Apt. #

1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I

years, with regular
promotions and pay in-
creases, the salary is up
to as much as $31,000.
If you qualify to
be an officer in the
Navy, chances are you
have what it takes to
succeed. The Navy just
makes it happen faster.

1J

1
I
I,

City State Zip
Age tCollege/University
$Year in College #GPA
AMajor/Minor

i ! a i. i M/t: i,! :.

jfflpi410 .-

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