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January 27, 1984 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-01-27
Note:
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Join a
culture
club,
University Philharmonia
School of Music
Hill Auditorium
Tuesday, January 31, 8 p.m.

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By Andrew Porter
P ICK ANY LSA student, regardless
of what class he may be in, and ask
him to show you how specialized he has
become in a particular area. Chances
are that he has obtained no serious level
of expertise that couldn't also have
been obtained by any other University
student within a semester or two.
Now pick out a student from the
School of Music and ask him to demon-

strate his talents. Chances are that he
has obtained a level of expertise that
no other non-music student could have
obtained without several years of work.
The point of this daring introduction
is this: Too often the talents of the bud-
ding young virtuosos in the School of
Music go completely unnoticed. Most of
the student body does not even realize
that these musicians are part of
University orchestras or that these or-
chestras give free concerts several
times during the year.
For those who dabble n the arts
throughout the year, make con-
tributions to music festivals, and listen
to old recordings of Toscaninni and
Horowitz playing Tchaikovsky's First
Piano Concerto, these concerts are not
spectacular, once-a-decade events. But
for those who appreciate classical
music, or even complex rock music
(music not aimed at the high school
element of society, i.e., Loverboy, Quiet
Riot), these concerts are exciting, in-
teresting, and overwhelming. They
give the average student a chance to
marvel at the underpublicised abilities
of his counterparts from North Cam-
pus.
Tuesday's program will provide the
unacquainted apprentice with a chance,
(Aren't we all sick of that term?) scene
in the country. Like all good bands, the
first edition of the Motels broke up in
1976.
The Motels regrouped, revamped and
got into the spotlight in 1978. Appearing
as a house band at Madame Wongs, the
Motels attained greater recognition and
began the battle for the ever-elusive
record contract. Capitol Records
finally clinched the deal.
Their introductory album,
mysteriously entitled The Motels
released in 1979 went gold in the USA,
Australia, and New Zealand. This was
the start of something big. Their single,
"Only the Lonely" went top ten in the
USA, and Davis received the award of
top ten vocalist from Creem Magazine
in both 1980, and in 1982.
Their biggest hit to date is "Suddenly
Last Summer" which I'm sure many of"

to soothe his ears with one of the most
popular pieces ever written,
Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. This
work meets the three standard
requirements that are usually set by
rowdy young collegiates as a formula
for good music.
The requirement for a gentle
relaxing melody that can, be played
during homework or on evenings with a
date. Classical music is usually
defeated in this category by James
Taylor, Bread, or Cat Stevens.-
Beethoven is sure to reverse this trend
come Tuesday. The second movement
of the Fifth Symphony is a lyrical gem.
* The requirement for something ob-
noxiously rowdy that can be played
during a wild party. Classical music
usually loses this category to The Sex
Pistols, Gang of Four, or The Who.
Deep inside Beethoven was a fiery,
troubled man whose works often reflec-
ted his brewing turmoil. The first, thir-
d, and fourth movements 'of the Fifth
Symphony provide that dynamic ex-
citement.
* The requirement for musical com-
plexity. Those who put down their
headphones after listening to Abbey
Road and marvel at The Beatles'
genius are guaranteed a surprise.
you listen to and hum along with.
Clearly, their latest album, Little
Robbers should break the Motels into
every rec room in the USA. It's more
light-hearted and reflects the strength
and professionalism of Davis and Co.
The Motels love to tour and do a great
deal of shows. They really had ants in

Beethoven weaves together so many
different melodies that run in so many
directions simultaneously that 15 or more
listenings are required before one' can
be sure that he's heard everything.
Ludwig van can put McCartney or
Townshend to shame.
And for fear that too much service
has been done to Beethoven, it must
also be stated that there is another in-
teresting piece on the program. Keith
Bryan, a superb flutist and member of
the School of Music faculty, will ac-
company the orchestra in the perfor-
mance of the second work, Telemann's
Suite in A minor for Flute and Strings.
Again, the unacquainted student will
have a chance to appreciate the
amazing virtuoso abilities of an accom-
plished soloist.
It is still not far enough into the term
to worry about grades, and two hours of
idle chatter in a dorm lounge is a very
poor alternative to the excellent
program at Hill Auditorium on Tuesday
night. It's time for the sophisticated
college youths in Ann Arbor to ex-
perience culture, and Beethoven's Fifth
is a great way to start.I
their pants to go out on the road with
their new album, Little Robbers. The
Motels, true to their record contract,
will appear at the Grand Circus Park
Theater on February 4th. The original
concert date was the 2nd, but has been
changed (Please take note). All Feb.
2nd tickets will be honored for the show
on the 4th. .

rt~un
THE BIG CHILL
Seven University alumni gather together at the
funeral of a friend, the results being humorous and
touching. Are these the best years of our lives?
(Movies at Briarwood, Briarwood Mall; 769-8780).
CHRISTINE
The unfulfilled adaptation of Stephen King's novel
focuses on the-antics of a very tempermental car,
and sparks fly. (Fox-village Theater, Maple village;
769-1300).
FLASHDANCE/STAYING ALIVE
The two movies of last summer make a return
engagement. If you're expecting dance-fine, but if
youcrave a good storyline-forget it. (Movies at
Briarwood, Briarwood Mall; 769-8780).
GORKY PARK
Can a jaded Russian agent detective save Russia
and the girl he loves from an international smuggling
scheme? (Movies at, Briarwood, Briarwood Mall;
769-8780).
DARK CIRCLE (Chris Beaver and Judy Irving,
1982)
How about getting the week started with an Ann
Arbor Premiere? Shot in Hiroshima, Rocky Flats
Nuclear Weapons Facility, Diablo Canyon, and
Nagasaki, the movie looks at the nuclear economy
through new footage and some recently declassified
from ye olde archives. (Ann Arbor Film Coop; Nat.
Sci. Aud., 7,00, 8:40, 10:20)
ALLEGRO NON TROPPO (Bruno Bozzetto,1976)
The music of Ravel, Vivaldi, Stravinsky, Dvorak,
Debussy, and Sibelius is put to work accompanying
some animation. The resemblance to Fantasia is in-
tentional. Before the first show, see Chapter 4 of
"Flash Gordon Conquers the Universe." (Classic
Film Theater; Michigan Theater, 7:20, 10:40)
THE TALL BLOND MAN WITH ONE BLACK SHOE
(Yves Robert, 1975)
Farce, French style. The tall blond man is a
violinist, and he gets caught up in some very serious
espionage. French with subtitles. (Classic Film
Theater; Michigan Theater, 9:00)
1900(Bernardo Bertolucci, 1976)
One of the classic Hollywood plots on a vastly more
epic scale. Donald Sutherland, Burt Lancaster,
Dominique Sanda, and Robert DeNiro in a film
tracing the interlocking fortunes of a rich and poor
child both born on the same day in Italy.
(Mediatrics; MLB 4,7:30)

HOT DOG
Yet another 'sex flick, only this time the action
takes place on snow-covered mountains. (Fox-
village Theater, Maple village; 769-1300).
THE LONELY HEARTS
A love story of unknown quality and content. (Ann
Arbor Theater, 210 S. 5th; 761-9700)
THE MAN WHO LOVED WOMEN
Burt Reynolds stars in a tepid and silly remake of
Truffaut's French classic. (Movies at Briarwood,
Briarwood Mall; 769-8780).
NEVER CRY WOLF
The Disney adaptation ofFarley Mowat's best-
seller about humans and their environment. (State
Theater, 231 S. State; 662-6264).
RISKY BUSINESS
Tom Cruise is a rich and naive teenager who
inherits a beautiful prostitute for a night. (State
Theater, 231 S. State; 662-6264).
RETURN OF THE JEDI
Third in a series of space-age flicks that combine
action, amusing scenarios and charismatic charac-
ters in an enjoyable, albeit mindless, movie (Fox
Village Theater, Maple Village; 769-1300).
SCARFACE
Cuban immigrant Tony Montana (Al Pacino)
DINER (Barry Levinson, 1982)
One of the sleepers of 1982. A bunch of friends just
sit and talk in the local diner in the late 1950s, trying
to get themselves prepared for life. (Alternative Ac-
tion; MLB 3, 7:00, 9:15)
THE DISCREET CHARM OF THE BOURGEOISIE
(Luis Bunuel, 1972)
Bunuel is at it again. This film, which seems to be
his most popular in the Ann Arbor area, is a satire
poking fun at the sex and eating habits of the middle
and upper class in France. French with subtitles. To
be preceded by a short, "The Stupor Salesman."
(Cinema Guild; Lorch Hall, 7:009:00)
THE YEA R OF LIVING DANGEROUSLY (Peter
Weir, 198.3)
One of last year's 10 best. The love story between
Mel Gibson and Sigourney Weaver is old-hat, but
Weir does his usual spectacular job on atmosphere.
His Indonesia around the time of the coup looks like
it. Linda Hunt also appears, and many critics'
groups are handing her awards. (Cinema 2; Aud. A,
7:00, 9:15)

seethes with passion and ambition; his wildest
dreams come true, bringing along some wild night-
mares. (Campus Theater, 1214 S. University, 668-
6416).
SILKWOOD
Karen Silkwood discovers disturbing things about
her plutonium plant. When she attempts to expose
them, she mysteriously dies in a car accident.
(Movies at Briarwood, Briarwood Mall; 769-8780).
STREAMERS
Both Robert Altman and his new film will be in
town this week. Streamers, the story of three young
soldiers before they're shipped off to Vietnam, is
perhaps the finest Altman film yet. A" must-see.
(State Theater, 231S. State; 662-0264).
SUDDEN IMPACT
Clint hits again, suddenly and repeatedly, as Dirty
Harry Callahan whose investigation of a murder
leads to a lovely lady and a psychopath. (State
Theater, 231 S. State; 662-6264).
TERMS OF ENDEARMENT
A widow (Shirley MacLaine), tries to settle some
of the confusing points of a mother/daughter
relationship with her daughter (Debra Winger).
(Ann Arbor Theater, 210 S. 5th;, 761-9700).

TESTAMENT
Jane Alexander
her family togetl
(Movies at Briarw
TO BE OR NOT TC
Mel brooks takes
the remake of the
Hitler and the G
Washtenaw; 434-17
TWO OF A KIND
The chemistry t
Newton-John can'
divine interventior
(Fox village Theal
UNCOMMON VAL
GeneHackman
Vietnam to find hii
Maple village;769
VERTIGO
The second of th
Hitchcock, Vertigo
Novak. Hitchcock e
the mind in this fas
(State Theater, 231

The Bland family is just that, and the modern sexual
scene is a little too much for them. They kill and rob
the participants to help get funding for their
restaurant. With Bartel, Mary Woronov, and Buck
Henry. (Ann Arbor Film Coop; MLB 4, 7:00, 8:40,
10:20)
48 HOURS (Walter Hill, 1982)
Nick Nolte, cop, joins Eddie Murphy, crook,
to try and stop some killers. vastly enjoyable, though,
a little bit too unoriginal. Murphy's screen debut.
(Cinema Guild; Lorch Hall, 7:00, 8:45, 10:30)
POCKETFUL OF'MIRACLES (Frank Capra, 1961)
A remake of Lady for a Day which stars Bette
Davis as a Runyonesque bag lady who needs to
become a "lady" when her daughter, who thinks she
is wealthy, schedules a visit. Other actors include
Peter Falk and Ann-Margaret in her screen debut.
(Alternative Action; Nat. Sci. Aud., 7:00)
MR. SMITH GOES TO WASHINGTON (Frank
Capra, 1939)
When Mr. Smith goes to our nation's capitol, he
discovers that the Senate is chock full of corruption,
a sharp blow to the idealist played by Jimmy
Stewart. The shock does not stop him from winning
over Jean Arthur. (Alternative Action; Nat. Sci.
Aud., 9:30)

r

st

ja*

The Motels
Grand Circus Theater
Saturday, January 4, 8 p.m.
By Melissia Bryan
H OUSEWIFE turned rock femme
fatale? Is there hope for those of
us with liberal arts degrees?
Martha Davis, founder and lead
singer of the Motels, quit the life of a
suburban California (no less)
housewife to form rock bands. She
began her music career in her teens,
writing songs with blues and jazz' in-
fluences. In the early '70s, Davis, then
in her 20s, fell under the spell of the
great hypnotiser, David Bowie. She
formed the Motels around 1975, moved
to Los Angeles and was instrumental in
formulating the first "New Wave"
* U
.
--Free birthday dinner for
parties of 4 or more. 0
a -3 eggrolls for only $2.00 .
* B
(Take-out only)
-Daily lunch specials
a for $3.99
* U
-Students receive 10 % off m
lunch and dinner prices.
(with this'coupon, 15% off)
U U
1133 E. Huron
. 662?93O3 U

EVERYTHING IN THE LIVELY ARTS
A Publication of The Michian Daily

DIVA (Jean-Jacques Beiniex, 1982)
The start of a new genre, the punk thriller. The plot
is a familiar one of an innocent getting caught up in
the underworld. (Mediatrics; MLB 3,7:00,9:15)
PIXOTE (Hector Babenco, 1981)
A critically acclaimed look at little bandits
growing up to be bigger bandits on the cruel streets
of Brazil, where the homeless children have little
else to do. (Cinema 2; Aud. A, 7:00,9:15)
THE SECRET CINEMA (Paul Bartel, 1966)
An independently made black comedy from the
'60s. Are they filming a young girl's life and showing
it in installments at a local movie theater? Or is the
truth even worse? (Ann Arbor Film Coop; MLB 4,
6:30,50t)
EATING RAOUL (Paul Bartel, 1982)
This very black comedy is at times hilarious, at
times a bit too understated, but always worth seeing.

r - m - - 'Clip and save $1.00 mm
SIX WAYS TO ENJOI
-THE BEST PIZZA
YOU'VE EVER
'TASTEDd
IAnd save$. 7
0
4' Now, you can save a buck when you try one of ou
5 special pizzas: Deli, Steak'n Cheese,,Veggie, Mex
u Bianco. What's the 6th way? An original 'Uno's, of
'd bring in this ad and we'll knock $1.00 off the price
thats already the bestI
. food value around! 0

rl
::: r.

THE APPRENTICESHIP OF DUDDY KRAVITS
(Ted Kotcheff, 1974)
One of the less memorable roles Richard Dreyfuss
has played. A boy in Montreal's Jewish ghetto in 1948
he wants to make something of himself. Funny in
parts, but a big ho-hum overall. (Hill Street Cinema;
1429 Hill, 6:45,9:00)
AIDA (ClementiFracassi, 1953)
Torn between two lovers...One is an Ethiopian
Princess. the other is life-which will be lost if the
Egyptian soldier fails to lead the army against the
Ethiopians. An opera, Italian with subtitles. (Cinema
Guild; Lorch Hall, 7:00,9:00)
THE PHANTOM TOLLBOOTH (Chuck Jones, 1971)
Animation and live-action combine in an adap-
tation of the Norton Juster story about Milo and his
magical world. The afternoon show will start off with
a cartoon and Chapter 5 of "Flash Gordon Conquers
the Universe." (Classic Film Theater; Michigan
Theater, 3:15,7:00)
WILLY WONKA AND THE CHOCOLATE FAC-
TORY (Mel Stuart, 1971)
An adaptation of the children's book by Roal Dahl
that stars Gene Wilder as the reclusive Wonka who
offers five kids a tour of his plant. "Oompa Loompa
Loompa Di Doo, have I got another story for you."
With musical lyrics like that, it's got to be good.
(Classic Film Theater; Michigan Theater, 5:15,
9:00)

Mel Gibson:
TEMPTATION O
The French tak
dertaken in Iran i
the people throu
Lorch Hall, 7:00, F
U4
I VITELLONI(Fi
The director ha
look at five friend
Italian with subt
7:00, 9:00)
ON THE WATER
Marlon Brando
the Best Actor Os
he won it. The filn
Best Picture. (H
9:00)
THE MAGNIFIC
1942)
Welles followedi
of Booth Tarking
Kane, it's still a f
seen. (Classic F
7:05, 9:00)
CITIZEN KANE i
Brilliant. The qu
William Randolp
techniques, uses a
plot, and good ac
American cinema
Theater, 9:00)
THE CARS THAT
The legions of V
- cannot have enoui
swoop down to see
town which likes
Theater; Michigan
PICNIC AT HANG
We will then
evening, a film of
girls who get losto
tling experience
audience. From t
Dangerously. (C
Theater, 9:00)

ur
ican or Pizza
f course! Just

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*1

MD2 Exp. 2/7 p

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Uv rear a b 769 174n ay -2a.m.ni in
---- -M M-M .M 5:. aM - mj

THE LAST SUPPER (Thomas Gutierrez Alea,1977)
Like something out of Bunuel. A Cuban count
stages a version of the famous meal with some of the
black slaves from his plantation in the eighteenth
century. Spanish with subtitles. (Ann Arbor Film
Coop, Romance Languages, History, and RC; MLB
1, 8:00, FREE)
THE STONES OF EDEN (1965)
Was Afghanistan paradise before being found by
the 20th century? Find out in this study of family life.
(Cinema Guild; Lorch Hall, 7:00,FREE)

'Diner': Fleetwood fun

8 Weekend/January 27, 1984

5 Wee

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