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January 27, 1984 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-01-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

Boycott
ends as
Nestle
alters sale
practices
tWASHINGTON (AP) - A boycott of
Nestle products in the United States
'was suspended yesterday when the
Swiss-based multinational corporation
-agreed to alter its infant formula sales
practices in Third World nations.
.No symbolize the end of the seven-
year-old boycott, Douglas Johnson,
ttional chairman of the Infant For-
mula Action Coalition, ate a miniature
Nestle Crunch bar presented to him by
a Nestle official. The chocolate candy is
one of the most familiar products made
'6the food products conglomerate.
"NESTLE HAS MOVED forward to
become a model for the whole industry,
a model which creates a new standard
of corporate behavior," Johnson said at
a news conference held jointly with the
company.
"This will protect the health and lives
of infants around the world from abuses
of marketing at any cost."
Johnson said he expects the boycott
of Nestle products in Canada to be
called off today as well. But he predic-
ted that the boycott committees in eight
other nations would wait until an inter-
national conference on infant formula
is heldin Mexico City next week before
deciding how to proceed.
RAFAEL PAGAN JR., president of
the Nestle Coordination Center of
Nutrition, said the company had agreed
to modify its practices in four areas so
that the boycott could end. Those areas
1 cover supplies to hospitals, package
labels, gifts to health professionals and
the kind of written materials 'given
mothers and health professionals about
infant formula.,
The boycott's aim was to force full
compliance with an infant formula
marketing code adopted by the U.N.
World Health Assembly in May 1981,
over the objections of the United States.
The boycott committee had conten-
ded that Nestle was improperly
promoting the use of infant formula as
an alternative to mother's milk in coun-
tries where inadequate sanitary
facilities could make it unsafe to use the
product.
The boycott organizers had argued
that Nestle encouraged mothers in un-
derdeveloped nations to think that for-
mula was more nutritious than their
own breast milk.
The marketing code prohibits
distribution of formula samples and gif-
} ts to doctors.
Pagan acknowledged that the boy -
cott has lost some business for the cor-
poration but he said the amount could
not be calculated. He said the company
has spent between $15 million and $20
million to comply with the U.N. code.
n1 ,
Woman harassed
A woman reported that two males

were staring at her and verbally
harasing her Wednesday night at the
Bits bus stop on North Campus, ac-
cording to University security officials.
Housing security contacted the woman
to ask her some questions, but she had
decided not to pursue the case. Security
officials were to identify the males
creating the disturbance.
- Nancy Gottesman

The Michigan Daily - Friday, January 27, 1984 - Page 5

Sci-fi signatures --.1V.
Science fiction writer Gene Wolfe autographs one of his books yesterday for John Carr, a graduate student at Ohio State
University. Wolfe was one of more than a dozen writers on hand for a science fiction promtion at the News Center on
South University.
Lousma enters Senate' race

LANSING (UPI) -Former astronaut
Jack Lousma announced before the
U.S. Senate yesterday he is not a
"professional politician" but is a
proven leader.
The Republican hopeful, whose of-
ficial announcement had been an-
ticipated for some time, launched his
campaign at a Capitol news conference
jammed with well-wishers, including
some prominent GOP figures.
HIS MAIN opposition will be former
Congressman James Dunn, whose
aides were distributing a new debate
challenge even before Lousma began
speaking.

Dunn already has attempted to por-
tray Lousma, who has not lived in
Michigan for many years, as a carpet-
bagger.
While Lousma never has run for elec-
tive office, his formal statement sought
to turn that potential liability into a
plus.
"I AM THE farthest thing .from a
professional politician that a person
can be," said the candidate, who
stresses his support for traditional in-
stitutions like the family and free en-
terprise.
"I have the energy, the leadership
qualities and the sense of values

required to represent Michigan faith-
fully."
Lousma and Dunn will vie for the
right to take on freshman U.S. Sen. Carl
Levin (D.-Mich.) this fall.
Lousma was born in Grand Rapids
and is a graduate of the University of
Michigan.
The 47-year-old father of four spent 25
years in the Marines and the National
Aeronautics and Space Administration.
Lousma's campaign stationery
features a view of earth from outer
space and one brochure shows him
posing in his space suit.

Witnesses say workers were abused

(Continued from Page 1)
heat and were fed moldy bread and
there were maggots in the frying pan.
The witness, Michael Wilcome, who
supervised the men said Mrs. Kozmin-
ski told him to "do what I had to to
make (Molitoris and Fulmer) do their
job. If I had to hit them or whatever."
Shortly after the two men had been
removed by the state officials last
August, the Kozminskis burned the
trailer, according to Wilcome.
WILCOME also said he saw a bust of
Adolf Hitler in the Kozminski's living

room which could conflict with earlier
statements made by defense attorney
Ivan Barris.
Barris said in his opening statement
Wednesday the Kozminski had been
imprisoned in a Nazi concentration
camp in the late 1930s as evidence that
Kozminski would not hold other people,
captive.
District Attorney Virgina Morgan
said Wednesday that because the two
men were mentally retarded they were
unable to break away from the Kozmin-
skis. She said the men were prohibited

from talking with neighbors or visitors,
who might have helped them escape.
During yesterday's trial Barris asked
the jury to leave while he spoke to
Joiner and the prosecuting attorneys.
Barris said that presenting the living
conditions of the workers, as ,evidence
was irrelevant to the charges of in-
voluntary servitude.
Joiner overruled the objection.
Rachel Gottlieb filed a report for
this story.

Senate repeals automatic pay raise

WASHINGTON (UPI) - The Senate,
not without a fight, voted yesterday to
kill an election-year pay raise of $2,443
that all members of Congress began
receiving Jan. 1.
The legislation passed 66-19 in the
Senate, where nearly a third of the
members are facing re-election, and
was sent to the House. Prospects for
passage are also good in the House.
The measure cleared the Senate after
multimillionaire Sen. Howard Metzen-
baum, (D-Ohio) charged some of the
repeal supporters with a lack of
"courage" and said, "I don't know if
thee victory is not shallow."
Metzenbaum directed his attack on
Sen.s Don Nickles (R-Okla.) and Jake
Garn (R-Utah) calling "unadulterated
malarkey" their claim that calling off
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the pay raise would help balance the
budget.
The 3.5 percent pay raise, which went
into effect Jan. 1, raised the salaries of
member of Congress from $69,800 to
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MEMBERS of Congress received the
pay raise along with most federal
government employees. The legislatin
passed yesterday would repeal the in-
.crease only for senators and
congressmen.

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