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January 27, 1984 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-01-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Reagan
makes first
paid trip of
re-election
cmpaign
From AP and UPI
ATLANTA - President Reagan, edging
up to his re-election announcement, told
14,000 people at a star-spangled rally
yesterday that America under his
leadership has "come too far, struggled
too&hard and accomplished too much to
turn back now."
"The spirit of America is strong and
the future of America is great,"
Reagan told the cheering crowd that
' filled the Omni sports arena just three
days before his formal re-election an-
nouncement.
FRESH FROM an optimistic report
on the state of the union, Reagan's trip
south was his first to be officially paid
for by the Reagan-Bush re-election
committee. the tab was about $50,000.
He received a tumultuous reception
from the flag-waving audience at the
"Spirit of America" free enterprise
rally sponsoed by the Amway Corp. and
Chamber of Commerce groups.
Many people carried such signs as
"God Bless America" and "One Nation
Under God" and "Atlanta Salutes Free
Enterprise," and the crowd booed down
a -small group of protesters who un-
furled a banner that said, "Reaganism

sulk risC117L

The Michigan Daily - Friday, January 27, 1984 - Page 3
Philosophy

PENTAGONprof writes on

I

college

By ELIZABETH CHARNOCK
What is the point of spending four
years at the University?
Are the long hours of studying essen-
tially useless information such as the
mating patterns of neolithic tribes
really worth the ultimate reward - a
thin sheet of parchment students can
hang on their office walls?
YES, says one University professor
who wrotea book on the topic.
LSA Associate Dean Jack Meiland,
author of College Thinking: How to Get
the Best of College, tries to teach
neophyte students the "rules of the in-
tellectual game."
"Students are plunged into college
work without its aims and methods
being explained to them. They are in
the same position as a person who is
asked to play a game of chess without
being told the rules of the game or what
counts as winning," Meiland said.
WHILE students often complain that-
learning facts in courses such as an-
thropology or philosophy does not have
any practical purpose, Meiland argues
that such classes teach students essen-
tial skills.
Learning to think critically and

hinking
analyze problems, albeit through
reading about primates,are vital tools
students will need in any job, Meiland
says.
Meiland's book is required reading
for all students enrolled in freshmen
composition courses as well as the
seminar he teaches entitled Methods of
Thinking.
"GRADUATING from high school
does not mean that you are ready for
college," said Anneliess Mauch, an LSA
freshwoman who read Meiland's book.
The book "brought up a lot of good poin-
ts that are generally glossed over."
With so many students required to
read Meiland's book which was
released in September of 1981, he
should be earning a substantial profit.
But Meiland stressed that he didn't
write the book to make money. Instead
he said he wrote the book to help
students make a smoother transition
from high school to college.
Meiland also chose Mentor Books to
publish College Thinking because they
agreed to sell the book for the lowest
retail price. The book costs $3.50 a copy.
Many publishers were interested in
the book, Meiland said, adding that it
was "suprisingly easy" to get printed.

AP Photo
Protesting hunger and unemployment, a group gathers outside the Atlanta building where President Reagan spoke
yesterday to have soup and sandwiches. Reagan received ovations and applause at his speech, but several protest
groups were in the area during his visit.

means hunger, racism, sexism and
unemployment."
THE 72-YEAR-old president sounded
an upbeat tone likely to mark his re-
election campaign, saying, "I believe
America is stronger, more prosperous
and more secure today than three years
ago.".
But he saved his most overtly
political remarks for a session an hour
later with the Southern Republican
L~eadersqhi C nnference_ whieh included

GOP officeholders, candidates, and ac-
tivists from 14 southern states.
Proclaiming that "deep down we
have every reason to be confident,"
Reagan said that in 1980 "a pessimism
hung over this land as never before.
Today there is hope. We promised to
make America strong again, and that's
exactly what we've done.
Reagan's political strategists
acknowledge he needs plenty of
Democratic votes to win re-election,

and the president said it was time to
"reach out to our Democratic friends as
never before. Let them know that
voting Republican isn't half bad.
"The Republican Party stands for a
strong America," he said. "We stand
for vibrant economic growth and low
inflation. We stand for the values of
work, neighborhood, family, faith,
peace, and freedom. These are the
things that unite us. Together we will
win and we will do it for America."

4 " ,

-HAPPENINGS-
Highlight
The Near Eastern & North African Studies Department is holding a con-
ference on, "The U.S. & the Search for Peace in the, Middle East," from 1-9
p.m. in Rackham Ampitheatre. Political Science Prof. George Grassmuck
will offer a tribute at 4:30 p.m. to Malcolm Kerr, slain president of the!
American University in Beirut.
Films
MED -1900, 7:30 p.m., MLB 4.
Alternative Action - Diner, 7 & 9:15 p.m., MLB 3.
Cinema Guild - The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie, 7 & 9 p.m., Lorch.
AAFC - Dark Circle, 7, 8:40 & 10:20 p.m., Nat. Sci.
Cinema Two - The Year of Living Dangerously, 7 & 9:15 p.m., Aud. A.
CFT - Allegro Non Troppo, 7:20 & 10:40 p.m., The Tall Blond Man with
One Black Shoe, 9 p.m., Michigan Theatre.
Performances
Michigan Ensemble Theatre-"Butley," 8 p.m., Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
Musical Society-Paul Taylor Dance Co., 8 p.m., Power Center.
School of Music-Voice Recital, Dennis Minges, 8 p.m., Recital Hall.
Eclipse Jazz-Drummer J.C. Heard, 9 & 11 p.m., U-Club.
Speakers
Natural Resources-"Corporate Ethics," Dick Madden, chairman of the
Potlach Corp. 3 p.m., Rm. 1040 Dana Bldg.
South & Southeast Asian Studies-Brown Bag, "Diversity in Japanese
Musical .Tradition: Center & Periphery," R. Anderson Sutton, noon, Com-
Mons, Lane Hall.
Guild House-"Student Power in the '80s," Tom Marx and Steve Austin,
noon, 802 Monroe.
International Center-Forum for Third World Women's Concerns, fIn-
tegration of Women into Sri Lanka's Development," 12:10 p.m., Inter-
national Center.
Meetings
Ann Arbor Chinese Bible Class-7:30 p.m., University Reformed Church.
Korean Christian Fellowship-9 p.m., Campus Chapel.
Chenese Christain Fellowship-"Fellowship & Bible Study," 7:30 p.m., 730
Tappan.
Bridge Club-Swiss Team Club Championship, 7:15 p.m., League.
Miscellaneous
University Musical Society-Auditions for chorus membership, 9 a.m.-
4:30 p.m., call 665-3717 for appointments.
Near Eastern & North African Studies-Conference, "The U.S. & the
Search for Peace in the Middle East," 1-9 p.m., Rackham Amphitheatres.
Folk Dance Club-Serbian folk dancing, 8 p.m., corner of State & William
Streets.
Women's Basketball-Mich. vs. Purdue, 7 p.m., Crisler Arena.
Tae Kwon Do Club-practice, 5 p.m., CCRB Martial Arts Rm.
Muslim Students Association-Discussion on events in Muslim world, 9
p.m., 407 N. Ingalls.

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To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109
Malicious Intent

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THE REASONS WHY AT THE
NBI 5th Annual Ann Arbor
OPEN HOUSE
MONDAY - TUESDAY - WEDNESDAY
January 30, 31, and February 1, 1984
9 A.M. to 7 P.M.

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