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January 20, 1984 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 1984-01-20

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Tle Michgan Daily - Friday, January 20, 1984
>artans fall again in OT

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full court
PRESS

EAST LANSING (AP) - Freshman
guard Steve Alfor'd tossed in 21 points to
lead Indiana to a 70-62 overtime victory
over Michigan State last night in Big
Ten college basketball action.
The Hoosiers, who outscored the
Spartans 10-2 in overtime, lifted their
record to 10-4 overall, 3-1 in the Big Ten.
The Spartans fell to 7-7 and 1-4.
SPARTANS forward Ben Tower for-
ced the overtime by sinking two free
throws with 13 seconds left to tie the
game at 60-60.
Indiana had built up a 55-50 advan-
tage with 5:56 remaining before
Michigan State roared back to take a
58-57 lead on a three-point play by
sophomore guard Scott Skiles.
The Hoosiers were held scoreless for
more than four minutes during one fir-
st-half stretch, but Alford hit eight poin-
ts to cut a four-point Michigan State
lead to 27-26 at halftime.
INDIANA scored 10 unanswered
points to start the second half, and build
a 36-27 lead.
Freshman forward Daryl Thomas
added 13 points for the Hoosiers, while
freshman ,forward Todd Meier had 10
points.
Freshman guard Darryl Johnson led
the Spartans with 17 points, while 7-foot
center Kevin Willis had 14 and Skiles
finished with 13.
Indiana travels to Michigan Satur-
day, while the Spartans play host to
Ohio State.
Minnesota 56, Iowa 49
IOWA CITY (UPI) - Junior guard
Tommy Davis scored 18 points and
Roland Brooks added 15 last night to
lead Minnesota to a 56-49 Big Ten vic-
tory over Iowa.
The Gophers' defense held Iowa to 34
Oercent shooting from the field and
gave up only two points in the final
three minutes to boost their conference
record to 2-3, 10-4 overall. Iowa, which
has beaten only Northwestern in four
league starts and has lost four of their
last five games, fell to 8-6.
SENIOR STEVE CARFINO led the
Hawkeyes with 12 points. Todd Berken-
pas and Greg Stokes added nine each.
Sophomores Marc Wilson and John
Shasky added eight points each for the
Gophers, who opened a six-point lead
midway through the second half.
Brooks picked up three consecutive
buckets, one on a driving slam dunk
and two on 17-foot jump shots, to put the
Gophers ahead, 38-32, with 11 minutes
to play.
STOKES WENT in for a dunk the next
time down the floor to start an 8-0 spurt
that gave the Hawkeyes their last lead,
40-38, at 8:16.
Two minutes later, Brooks, a senior
forward, converted a three-point play
to put Minnesota back on top, 43-42.
Davis did the same with 2:20 remaining

to give the Gophers their biggest lead,
54-47.
Davis gave Minnesota a 15-14 advan-
tage when he scored his eighth point on
a long-range jumper seven minutes
before halftime. The lead changed han-
ds 10 times in the first half with the
Gophers holding a 24-22 edge at inter-
mission.

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0

1eat i Te
. .. 1-4 in- Big Ten

AP Photo
' Indiana's Daryl Thomas takes the ball away from Ben Tower of Michigan
State in action last night at Jenison Field House in East Lansing. The
Hoosiers handed the Spartans their fourth straight loss, 70-62, in overtime.

OFFER BOODFOR2WEE

-/4

I. ,

Wisconsin 61, N. U. 60
EVANSTON (AP) - John Ploss's
basket and a free throw by freshman
Mike Heineman led Wisconsin's
Badgers to a 61-60 overtime victory
over Northwestern in a Big Ten basket-
ball thriller last night.
David Mipler's three-point play with
52 seconds left in regulation lifted the
Badgers into a tie and forced the over-
time after Northwestern had blown a
54-45 lead.
THE VICTORY GAVE Wisconsin a 3-
2 record in the Big Ten and 7-7 overall
while Northwestern fell to 1-3 and 8-6.
Northwestern gained the tip in over-
time but tried to run the clock down
only to lose possession. Ploss's basket,
only his second of the game, gave the
Badgers the lead and Heineman ad-
ded his free throw before Art Aaron
scored for Northwestern's only points
in the extra period.
Aaron finished with 21 points and
teammate Andre Goode added 14.
Ricky Olson had 20 for Wisconsin with
Cory Blackwell adding 19.
OLSON AND BLACKWELL, scoring
12 points each and 24 of Wisconsin's fir-
st-half points as the Badgers held a
28-27 halftime advantage.
Northwestern, on the shooting of
Goode and Aaron, sped to a 12-4 lead but
Wisconsin came back to tie it at 12-all.
Big Ten Standings

Everyone has a scapegoat
.Wh o really lost the OSUgame?
By JEFF BERGIDA
A LOT OF finger-pointing went on at Crisler Arena Wednesday night
following Michigan's first home loss of the season. It seemed like
everyone had his own personal scapegoat.
Michigan. coach Bill Frieder was perhaps the most frequent target.
People criticized Frieder for playing Tim McCormick for 24 minutes while
the 6-11 center clearly was affected by his recent illness. Many questioned
the move to start Dan Pelekoudas over Leslie Rockymore or Antoine
Joubert.
Another major issue was the coach's multiple substitutions. An irate
group of fans called the Daily after the game to say that Frieder blew the
game. They said his rapid turnover of personnel leads to a lack of con-
tinuity.
Frieder was not the only object of abuse. Eric Turner, who hit only three
of 12 shots (two airballs), and committed three turnovers, found himself
condemned for lack of consistency.
The men in the striped shirts got their fair 'share as the Wolverines,
especially Roy Tarpley, were victims of a number of questionable charging
calls. As long as we're blaming everyone, why not mention'Metrosports?
Michigan is now 0-2 in nationally-televised contests.
Crowd deserves some blame
One group that no one mentioned during the post-game festivities is the
fans. Maybe it's time for them to be accused.
The majority of fans at Crisler continually display the lack of emotion
which has helped keep Michigan under .500 in conference since 1978. In a
league as talented and balanced as the Big Ten, Michigan is the only team
without a true, home court advantage.
In fact, let this be a public message to the people who have been staying
away from Michigan basketball games because they don't like crowds.
There are no crowds at Crisler.
There are persons in the building, of course. If you believe the official at-
tendance-taker or whoever is in charge of head counting, 13,011 of them were
at the Ohio State game. It's just that the people are missing the same quality
that Frieder's crew has been accused of lacking-continuity.
Michigan fans never will be the type that stand for the national anthem
and don't sit down until they get back to their cars. Just as an example,
compare the Wolverine faithful to some real basketball fans, the crowd at
last Saturday's Michigan-Wisconsin game in Madison.
Wednesday night, the Maize and Blue "fans" b5ooed Dan Pelekoudas
whenever he entered the game. It's time they figured out that Pelekoudas is
a role player. His job is to play defense and not make mistakes when he han-
dles the ball. He committed one turnover against OSU.
Wisconsin's fans never booed the home team. They continuously .were
loud and supportive, even when Michigan cut a 12-point halftime deficit to
two in the second half.
Therein lies the difference. Wolverine rooters can get as loud as anyone,
but while other fans can keep it up through a 40-minute game, the hoise at
Crisler may peak for as long as nine seconds. That usually occurs after a
dunk. It doesn't take much expertise on the sport to appreciate a dunk.
Obviously something is wrong when the fans of a 6-7 team find more to
cheer about than their counterparts of a team with hopes of an NCAA tour-
nament berth. What's the explanation?
Church atmosphere nofun
It used to be fashionable to blame the cheerleaders and the band but while
they don't exactly lift the people out of their seats, most fans wouldfind a 62-
60 game exciting without artificial thrills.
The real problem is that the non-students attending the basketball games
just aren't the partying type. Professor So and So takes a break from
working on the third edition of his Statistics textbook by grabbing a courtside
seat at Crisler. Not only does he remain seated throughout, he finds it an ef-
fort to clap.
Another situation which must be corrected is that students who want to get
rowdy are seated next to families with four kids and grandma in attendance.
If the students in the Gold seats stand, they are verbally abused by the ac-
countant sitting behind them.
Finally, you can't really get obnodious in a place that looks like the Sistine
Chapel. At the Wisconsin Field House, everyone sits on benches like those in
Yost Arena. At Crisler, you can lean back and take a nap during time-outs
and halftime. A lot of fans doze off during the game.
. Just to put things in perspecive, with two seconds remaining Wednesday
night and score tied at 60, both Frieder and OSU coach Eldon Miller called
time out. There won't be many more dramatic moments this season. While
the real fans were biting their nails, some winner up in the Gold section was
deeply engrossed in his Wall Street Journal.
An 11-4 team deserves better.

4

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Purdue..........
Illinois ..........
Indiana..........
MICHIGAN......
Wisconsin.......
Minnesota........
Northwestern ......
Iowa.............
Ohio State.........
Michigan State .....

Conf.
WL
40
31
31
32
32
23
13
13
13
14

Overall
W.L
11 3
12 2
10 4
11 4
77
10 4
86
86
86
77

MICHIGAN WEEKEND ACTION:

4

Tankers to splash with Hurons

en T c......
INTHE
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322 SOUTH STATE STREET

Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9:00-5:30
Sat. 10:00-5:00
SALE ENDS FEB. 7, 1984

For All 1984 Words of Wisdom.

I

I

By MIKE REDSTONE
The Michigan men's- swim team could be a little tired
tonight as it goes against defending Mid-American Conferen-
ce champion Eastern Michigan at 7:30 p.m. in the Matt Mann
Pool.
This fatigue, however, will not result from a recent hard-
fought meet. Rather, it will be due to the Wolverines' full
practice earlier in the day.'
MICHIGAN COACH JON Urbanchek has worked his team'
through double practices all week and treats the meet again-
st the Hurons as "just another practice."
"We're not worrying about this meet," said a confident
Urbanchek. "They (EMU) always get psyched up against us
and swini well, but we should be able to win the meet."
The Wolverines will use this meet primarily to improve
their swimming strategy, according to Urbanchek. "You
need a meet like this to keep the kids sharp," he said.
Urbanchek hopes swimming double practices straight
through tonight's meet will keep his team strong for next
week's meet against Big Ten-rival Indiana.
Tumblers battle Gophers
When the Michigan men's gymnastics team hosts the Min-
nesota Gophers tonight at 8:00 p.m. at Crisler Arena, it will
try to regain the consistency it lost over the holiday break.
"In the Wolverine Invitational (in December) we had an
outstanding finish," said Michigan head coach Bob Darden.
"We reached the ultimate level to be reached with our

routines. We backed off the consistency aspect and improved
the difficulty within our routines. Now we're reworking in
the consistency."
SOPHOMORE GAVIN Mayerowitz concurred that con-
sistency is a goal against Minnesota.
'"Basically what I've been doing is polishing up on my
routines," said Meyerowitz. "I've been taking the finer poin-
ts and fixing them up. Doing a flawless routine is what I'm
working on."
Consistency is something Minnesota has achieved by
placipg in the top three of the Big Ten in each of the past five
years.
"Minnesota is a perennial powerhouse," Darden said.
"Their title was usurped last year by Ohio State and Illinois
(who tied for the conference title). They're still very
strong."
" -ANDREA WOLF
Thinclads host Rela vs
The distance medley relay is the event foremost on the
mind of coach Francie Goodridge as the women's track team
prepares for today's Michigan Relays at the Track and Ten-
nis Building.
V THE WOLVERINE COACH is hoping for strong perfor-
mances from relay team members Joyce Wilson. Martha
Gray, Jennifer Rioux and Sue Schroeder so that they "can
really smash our school record" in an event she feels
Michigan will have no trouble winning.!RANDYgCHWARTZ

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