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January 20, 1984 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-01-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Urban League calls
black America a disaster

The Michigan Daily - Friday, January 20, 1984 - Page 3
t.Governor speaks on
future of equal rights

*WASHINGTON (UPI) - The state of
black America is a disaster, but blacks
are gaining political clout that both
temocratic and Republican parties
will have to reckon with in this election
year, the head of the National Urban
League said yesterday.
"While white Americans celebrate a
long-overdue economic recovery and a
talling unemployment rate, blacl
America is buried in a depression of
crushing proportions,",Urban League
chief John Jacob told a news conferen-
ce. "The plain ugly fact is that there is
no recovery for black Americans."
JACOB RELEAgED the league's an-
nual "State of Black America" report,
which includes papers on the economy,
"high tech" industries, the black,
single female household, the black vote,
the state of urban education and
development of civil rights law in the
past 30 Years.
"The state of black America is a,
disaster," he said.

Jacob said blacks, angry and
frustrated, are turning to the political
process as the vehicle to win economic
opportunity and protect their rights.
"BLACK VOTING power is a
political reality that should force all
parties and candidates to display
greater sensitivity to issues that con-
cern black people - issues like jobs,
hunger, education and fairness," he
said.
He said Jesse Jackson's campaign
for the Democratic presidential
nomination will "force to the forefront
many of the issues" of concern to
blacks.
"Poor people are caught between a
rock and a hard place," he told repor-
ters. "They are squeezed out of the job
market at the same time that federal
employment and social service
programs have been cut to the bone."
Jacob said black unemployment
remains about 18 percent, a third of

Jacob
... emphasizes blacks' voting power
black workers between the ages of 20
and 24 are out of work and half of all
black children live in households below
the poverty line.
"The black poor have been relegated
to an out-of-sight, out-of-mind status in
American life," he said.

City matched with Soviet town

By GEORGEA KOVANIS
Lt. Governor Martha Griffiths last
night said she has an optimistic outlook
for the future of the Equal Rights
Amendment.
Even though women still aren't
treated equally, she said, Griffiths told
about 120 University students, faculty
and community members at East Quad
she is confident the issue is not dead.
"THE WOMEN'S rights movement is
more like a tidal wave moving in,"
Griffiths said. "Nothing, absolutely
nothing, can stand in its way."
Griffiths was in town last night to
keynote the Seventh Annual Women's
Weekend sponsored by the Residential
College which starts today.
Although women in today's society
still suffer tremendous inequalities and
injustices, there is still hope, Griffiths
said.
"I THINK that you're going to find in
your lifetime . .: that you will also have
the ability to cure (these inequalities),"
she said, adding that the future of the
ERA is a bright one.
"I think (the ERA) will finally pass,"
Griffiths said. "I don't think it's
possible to keep it out. Personally, I
think the time will come," Griffiths
said.
She said she thinks the ERA will pass
because the logic of the American
people will prevail and they will realize
laws that discriminate against women
are unfair.
THE LT. governor was also op-
timistic about the chances for a woman
to become president. "I personally
think that. . . before you die, there will
be a woman president," she said.
Griffiths also said that Jesse
Jackson's campaign for the presidency
has "brightened up" the race.

By CAROLINE MULLER
"At this dangerous, tense time, in
history, we of Ann Arbor extend our
greetings to the people of Baranovichi.
We reach out across the many miles,
seeking to share the world of human
experiences which unite us rather than
separate us..."
These words begin a letter of greeting
from the people of Ann Arbor to the
people of Baranovichi USSR, a small
village 70 miles southwest of Minsk.
The letter, which will be sent within
two weeks, is part of the Ground Zero
Pairing Project, a nationwide

organization founded for the purpose of
pairing more than 1,300 U.S. and Soviet
cities to form a framework to help the
countries learn more about each other.
THE PURPOSE of the program, says
Ann Arbor organizer Karen Sayer, is to
help ease East-West tensions "so that
people on both sides look at people like
people." Over 900 U.S. cities have
already sent portfolios with
photographs and information about
their city to Soviet cities.
More than 50 people attended the first
local Ground Zero meeting which was
held last night in the Ann Arbor public

---
-HAPPENI NGS-
Highlight
Executive, director of the Michigan Governor's Conference on Jobs and
Development Peter Eckstein, will( speak today at 3 p.m. on "Target In-
dustries for Michigan Economics Development." Eckstein's speech, part of
the School of Natural Resources "Laird, Norton Distinguished Visitor
Series," will be held at Rm. 1040, in the Dana Building.
Films.
Mediatrics - Cat People (original version) 7:30 p.m., Cat People (1982
remake) 9 p.m., Nat. Sci.
CFT - Wizards, 7:15 & 11:20 p.m., The Lord of the Rings, 9 p.m., Michigan
Theatre.
Cinema Two - Beauty and the Beast, 7 p.m., The Golden Coach, 8:45 p.m.,
Aud. A.
Cinema Guild - Seven Beauties, 7 & 9:05 p.m., Lorch.
Speakers
Nuclear Engineering - Colloquium, 3:30 p.m., White Aud., Cooley Bldg.
Guild House - Luncheon, "An Economic Strategy for the Left," Thomas
Weiskopf, noon, 802 Monroe.
Residential College - "Black Liberation & peace: The Pentagon Budget &
Black Americans," Manning Marable, 4 p.m., Rm. 126 E. Quad, "Contem-
porary Black Politics: Jesse Jackson & Political Strategies Beyond 1984," 8.
p.m., Kuenzel Rm. Union.
Anthropology - Colloquium, "Inventing Kinship: The Works of Lewis
Henry Morgan," Thomas Trautman, 4 p.m., 2021 LSA.
Performances
Music School - Honors Band and Orchestra, 8 p.m., Hill Aud.
Music School - Violin Recital,;Laura Hammes, 8 p.m., Recital Hall.
Union Arts - "The Music of Gershwin," pianists John Jarrett & Randall
Faber, 8 p.m., Pendleton Rm., Union.
Meetings
Muslim Students Association - 9 p.m., 407 N. Ingalls.
Chinese Students Christian Fellowship - 7:30 p.m., 730 Tappan.
Korean Christian Fellowship - 9 p.m., Campus Chapel.
Ann Arbor Chinese Bible Class -7:30 p.m., University Reformed Church.
University Regents - 9.p.m., Regents Rm., Fleming Administration Bldg.
Bridge lub - 7:15 p.m., Assembly Hall, Union.
Miscellaneous
Minority Student Services - Open house, 3-5 p.m., 2204, 2209 Union.
Tae Kwon Do Club - practice, 5 p.m., CCRB Martial Arts Rm.
Folk Dance Club - Bulgarian Dancing, 8 p.m., corner of State and
Williams Streets.
Men's Swimming - Michigan vs. EMU, 9:30 p.m., Matt Mann Pool.
Men's Gymnastics - Michigan vs. Minnesota (Coed), 7:30 p.m., Crisler.
Women's Indoor Track - Relays, 6 p.m., Track & Tennis Bldg.
Museum of Art - "Contemporary Sculpture," 12:10 p.m., Museum of Art.
Kiwanis Club - Special Olympics - 10 a.m.-noon, 1085 E. Michigan, Yp-
silanti.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109
Malicious intent

library. Ann Arbor has been matched to
the Russian city Baronovichi, which is
similar in size and location to Ann Ar-
bor.
Although most people thought the
idea was good, some thought the group
should be very cautious when choosing
what to send over.
"A PAIR OF blue jeans in the Soviet
Union cost one whcle month of wages,"
said one participant. "Almost anything
we do is going to look damned
privileged."-
"This is something that is life-
affirming," Sayer said, "something
that feels good to work on"'
"I think this is a people to people-
project - it transcends the gover-
nment," said Ann Arbor resident and
Ground Zerio participant Mickey
Sperlich who plans to become more in-
volved in the project. "I'm here partly
due to my own sense of despair (over
.the nuclear arms race)...it's something
I can do to help."
Soviet officials have expressed in-
terest in the Ground Zero program, said
Ann Arbor chairman Judy Volker, but
none have made a commitment yet.
1 U
DIAL- A
JEWISH - STORY I
995-5959 f
1 HEAR A NEW STORY EVERY SUNDAY I
I Anoth.r Project of the Chobad Houe
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Doily Photo by REBECCA KNIGHT
Lt. Governor Martha priffiths encourages women before an audience at
East Quad last night.

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LAST DAY
Fri. Jan. 20th
TIME
11:00 am to
4:00 pm

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Game.s of the Nf/lbd Oymp,.d Los Angeles 184

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