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January 19, 1984 - Image 8

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-01-19

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Page 8 - The Michigan Daily - Thursday, January 19, 1984

7 HAIRCUTTERS
SNO WAITING
DASCOLA STYLISTS
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Cagers lose at buzzer

(Continued from Page D'
Stokes said the shot felt good from the
moment it left his hands.
"Yeah, I felt pretty good about it,"
Stokes said. "I followed through and
let it fly."
OHIO STATE got into the position to
make the shot by maintaining
possession of the ball for the last 2:06 of
the game. Stokes lost the ball on a drive
with 1:05 left, but it went off a Michigan
hand out of bounds.
Troy Taylor was tied up for a jump
ball a few seconds later, but it was the
Buckeyes' ball on the alternate
possession. Turner knocked the ball
away from Stokes with two seconds left,
before the fatal bomb. It was that kind
of game for Bill Frieder's Wolverines.
"I think the key to the game was Ohio
State made more big plays than we
did," Frieder said. "We had five or
seven opportunities to extend the lead
in the second half and we missed jum-
pers and it just didn't happen."
While Michigan wasn't making the
plays down the stretch, Ohio State's
smooth-as-silk forward Tony Cam-
pbell.was.The 6-7 senior consistently hit
15 to 18-foot jumpers in both halves. He
finished with a game-high 22 points and
eight of the Buckeye's last 12 points.
"I was shooting it well," said Cam-
pbell, who shot it well enough to go 8-14
from the floor, mostly from long
distance. "They try to push me outside.

They want me to shoot that jumper."
While Campbell was doing it outside,
he and his teammates were giving
Michigan fits inside. With a sizeable
height advantage (Ohio State started a
6-2, forward, David Jones), Michigan
should have controlled the boards.
They didn't.
Despite having a seven-rebound ad-,
vantage, the Wolverines did not control
their defensive boards. They allowed
nine Buckeye offensive rebounds, com-
pared to their own 15 defensive boards.
Michigan had chances in both halves
to make a run and put the game away.
They opened up a 27-19 lead midway
through the first half with a 10-2 run.
But Ohio State charged back, scoring 12
of the last 16 points in the period to take
a a8-33 lead at the half.

Leslie Rockymore got hot from out-
side to start the second half, helping the
Wolverines rebuild a 53-48 lead. The
Rock finished with a team-high 12 poin-
ts, but his last bucket came with 12
minutes left in the game.
The Buckeyes rallied back and the
two arch-rivals fought it out to the end.
The ending pleased Ohio State coach
Eldon Miller very much. He even ad-
mitted he liked his team, which had lost
four straight before last night.
"I started to like them versus Illinois
(in last week's 55-53 loss)," he said,
refusing to crack a smile. "I liked 'em
better tonight. I hope I continue to like
'em next game."

Buzzered

OHIO STATE

MICHIGAN
MinFG/AFT/A R

A PF TP

MinFG/A
Campbell..........39 8/14
Jones..............32 4/5
McGee........... 14 3/5
Taylor..... . 38 4/13
Stokes ............ 33 3/5
Wesson ............ 26 2/4
Hopson............16 0/2
Wilson ............ 2 0/1
Team
Totals .....:...... 200 24/49

FT/A
6/6
1/2
2/2
4/4
1/2
0/0
0/1
0/0
14/17

R
5
6
6
0
2
4
0
0
2
25

A
1
2
0
2
1
I
0
0

PF
1
2
2
1
1
3
0

TP
22
9
8
12
7
4
0
0
62

Rellford ........... 14

1/3 0/0 2 0 2 2

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Wade............
Tarpley .........
Pelekoudas........
Turner..........
McCormick .......
Rockymore........
Joubert ...........
Henderson........
Thompson........

23
23
13
36
24
30
26
5
6

3/6
3/9
1/3
3/12
4/7
6/10
4/8
0/0
0/0

1/1
2/2
0/0
2/2
2/4
0/0
3/3
0/0
0/0

7
9
2
2
1
2
2
i

0
0
0
3
2
2
5
0

3
4
0
2
2
2
0
2.

7
8
2
8
10
12
11
0
0

7 11

Halftime score: Ohio State 38, MICHIGAN 33
Attendance: 13,011

Team
Totals............200 25/58 10/12

4
32 12 17 60

SPORTS OF THE DAILY:
Wings lose seventh straight., 4-2

By PHIL NUSSEL
Special to the Daily
DETROIT -It's official - the Red
Wings have now lost seven straight and
need only one more to equal the
season's longest losing streak.
Last night at Joe Louis Arena, the
loss came against the Calgary Flames,
4-2. The setback put the Wings' record
at 15-26-4 and raised the Flames' record
to 18-19-9.
Right wing Hakan Loob started the
scoring for Calgary at 2:54 of the first

period. The goal, assisted by Steve
Tambellini and Paul Baxter, was
Loob's 20th.
FOR THE NEXT 12 minutes the Red
Wings put considerable pressure on
Flames' goalie Reggie Lemelin. John
Ogrodnick tied the game up with his
31st goal of the year at 14:37. The assist
came from rookie Steve Yzerman.
Four minutes later, Lane Lambert
was whistled off for interference at
17:12. The penalty set up a power play
goal by the Flames' Eddie Beers at

U ofM
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FINAL TRYOUTS:
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18:15. It was his tenth power play goal
of the year.
The Wings had their chances the first
period. Kelly Kisio had two breakaways
and missed on both of them.
The second period was all Calgary,
even though Detorit outshot the Flames
10-9. The Flames got goals from Bax-
ter, his seventh, and another from
Loob.
ACTION PICKED UP in the third
period as the Wings hit Lemelin with 10
more shots. Only one shot, however, got
through and it came from captain Dan-
ny Gare at 6:09. It was his fifth goal of
the year.
The rest of the period saw almost
constant action up and down the ice, but
the wings could not get the puck past
Lemelin - even though they had two
more power plays.
All in all, the Wings missed on six
power play opportunities and this
reflects their losing streak.
The chances are there; but the goals
are not.
Nets 124, Pistons 115
PONTIAC (AP) - Buck Williams
scored 23 points, and Otis Birdsong ad-
ded 22 as the New Jersey Nets notched
a 124-115 National Basketball
Association victory over the Detroit
Pistons last -night.
The victory offset a 33-point, 17-
rebound performance by Detroit center
Bill Laimbeer. The points were a
career high.
Laimbeer scored 17 points and grab-
bed seven rebounds in the first quarter
to help Detroit rally from a 19-10 deficit
to a 25-23 lead at the 4:01 mark. Detroit
was up 36-34 at the end of the period.
Terry Tyler hit an 18-footer to pull the
Pistons within 110-103 with 4:05 left in
the game, but that was as close as
Detroit could get. Tyler finished with 20
points.
Bucks 99, Hawks 90
MILWAUKEE (AP) - Marques
Johnson scored 31 points as the
Milwaukee Bucks survived a 12-point
second quarter last night to defeat
Atlanta 99-90 for a fourth successive
National Basketball Association vic-
tory.
Milwaukee, trailing 76-69 after three
quarters, cut the lead to 80-78 on John-
son's 18-footer with 7:58 remaining. Af-
ter Atlanta's Mike Glenn hit an 18-
footer, the Bucks went on a 9-1 scoring
spurt for an 87-83 lead.
The Hawks got no closer than four
points thereafter. The victory moved
Milwaukee back to exclusive ownership
of the NBA Central Division lead.
Atlanta led 29-28 after the first period
and was clinging to a 36-35 advantage
with 7:19 left in the half. The Hawks,
behind Dominique Wilkins' 11 points,
outscored Milwaukee 18-5 for a 56-40
halftime lead.
Wilkins led the Hawks with 23 points,
followed by Dan Roundfield with 18 and
Glenn with 13, Atlanta saw its four-,
game winning streak snapped.

Daily Photo by DAN HA8B
Dennis Hopson of Ohio State blocks a shot by Wolverines' Antoine Joubert in
Michigan's 62-60 loss at the hands of the Buckeyes last night.
fis ISeelIt
By LARR YMISHKIN
Music and sports ..,
.Dead set a good examp le
LET'S TALK ABOUT music for a minute.
I know this is suppose to be a sports column, but it's nice to write about
music every now and then, and besides, there is a sports-related point to all
of this.
In music there is rock groups and then there is ROCK groups, the latter
being the big names in the industry. I'm talking about the Beatles, Rolling
Stones, the Who, etc..
But, when talking about a group in terms of fan support and oyalty,you'd
be hard pressed to find a more popular group than the Grateful Dead. In
fact, more people have seen the Dead in concert than any other musical
group (rock or not), consisting of the same members.
The Dead's biggest fans are a group of individuals known as Deadheads,
those strange people that you may have heard about who follow the band
around the country and have seen anywhere from 20-200 shows. The.
Deadheads determination to see their band is an excellent example of
loyalty, not to mention good taste, that deserves a pat on the back.
And the Deadheads get that recognition from the people who owe it to them
the most, bandmembers themselves. The Dead repay their devout listeners
by performing long and varied shows, for a reasonable price in a variety of
locations.
Where's the sorts?
Of course the Deadheads could become vulnerable to attack if the quality
of a Dead show (or shows) ever drops to a level that makes it seem foolish to
have driven so far for the show. And on the occasions, rare as they may be,
that the Dead do perform a show that is sub-par as far as the Deadheads are
concerned, the Dead's critics have their day.
Okay already, so where's the sports?
Well, the point is, that the Dead are a lot like the University of Michigan
and its athletic department. The athletic department is thejest of its kind in
the country and the University's sports reputation is also of the highest
caliber.
Thus, Michigan fans and Deadheads have a lot in common. Each Saturday
during the fall, Michigan Stadium is filled to capacity as the largest audien-
ce watching a football game in the United States on that day gathers to see
Mighty Michigan crush whomever it is playing. And when the Wolverines
have won, as they tend to do, Michigan fans walk out of the stadium and
smug smiles of confidence fill Hoover Ave.
However, in the past few years, the Michigan mystique has begun to fall
apart and Wolverine fans are facing some trying times. Imagine, in the last :
four years Michigan has lost to Notre Dame twice, Wisconsin, Iowa, UCLA
twice, Washington twice, Ohio State twice and even to Illinois.
Look who's talking now
I came to Michigan confident of, four years of football success and let all
my friends know about it. And why shouldn't'I have been confident? After
all, this was the same Michigan thatwould win games 70-3, 64-10, 55-12 and
by other outrageous scores every time I looked in the paper.
But let me tell you, after the Wolverines lost in Champaign last fall, I
wasn't doing very much talking.
And this is where the big difference between music and sports comes into
play, at least as far as the Dead and Michigan is concerned.
When the Dead put on that rare unexciting performance, you know that the
next time they come out they might play all night. The Deadheads know that
and that is why they areso loyal.
Michigan fans are loyal too, but how much longer they will remain that
way is unclear. After Don Canham watched his basketball team suffer
through two losing seasons, his football team lose a Rose Bowl and then slip
to Sugar Bowl standing, and subsequently lose there too, he calmly announ-
ced that Michigan basketball road games this year would only be available
via a cable company that does not serye the Ann Arbor area and charges
$595 per gane.
That's not showing very much appreciation for a group that helped make
Canham and his department number one.
With the recent slip in the level of Michigan athletics, Canham and his
department might be wise to take a pointer or two from Jerry Garcia and his
pals in fan appreciation.
After all, if the Dead can start playing "St. Stephen" again, Canham can
certainly afford to televise a couple of basketball games for free.

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