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January 19, 1984 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-01-19

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ARTS

The Michigan Daily

Thursday, January 19, 1984

Page 5.

. . ... ..........

So
of
IT'S LI!
things
and effec
the things
the reasor
-the reaso
others; so
have thi
tradition
reasonsr
and you h
-anything
When
people li
nurmber
those whl
sounds an
,smitted
,Operating
FM dial,
,native co
Afar past t
But the
area res
hear; C]
.programi
unheardc
playlists,
American
The p
micropho
records t
etude both
,ranging ft
-;Ugw u .to

,Arwulf, w
;invited F
the splend
The bro
t DJ may]1
months1
longstand
Myer an
together
directorsh
At 28, S
elder stat
of the sta
Simonian
in 1975 a.
suggestior
noticed h
Having gr
snow-defu
(replaced
municatio
broadcast
progam
done close
Myer, n
urban pla
sophomor
She becan
'the follo
Michael l
"worked
station vi;
realm thro
That re
ensure a
music for
receives_
from the U
after oper
.record pu
thereforec
panies for
The CB
of Simoni
sibility, lie
taining coi
of indepen
often Jack
Both par
station ge
companies
The pr(
beyond An
station rep
it plays to
publicati
playlists:
Rockpool,
Myer obse
get a lett
pany) that
in this pu
you'd be in

unding the limits
R adio Free& A
KE THIS: this is the way "Ann Arbor is really fortunate
are, these are the cause that,.:not only do wehave CBN but
t relationships. These are we have a record store (Schoolkid's)
you enjoy, and these are where you can buya lot of (indepen-
ns you enjoy them. Some of dent label) stuff we're into. There's
ns are more clouded than a real sense of community there.
)me of the reasons we don't And record companies notice that,"
e correct language or Myers says.
to express. And so some The cooperative feeling is more
remain forever wordless, than' ecoomic, however, Simonian
ave to listen closely to hear observes. Representatives of
at all. smaller record companies "are in-
WCBN broadcasts, do terested in the music a lot more than
sten? Not an enormous some of the people working for the
of people, perhaps, but large companies, so you can talk
o do tune in are privy to about the music with them and
id reasons not usually tran- develop a'relationship."
on other frequencies. That sense of common interest
at 88.3 megahertz on the between independent labels and
CBN's 10 watts of alter- college radio helped fuel the early
llege radio doesn't reach new wave explosion during the late
he city limits. '70s. The role of college radio
re are few limits to what stations in introducing such groups
idents and students can as Joy Division, the English Beat,
BN boasts a variety of and the Talking Heads, is widely
ming which is virtually acknowledged. This "new" music,
of in an era of commercial by gaining a growing and en-
video-oriented rock, and thusiastic (read: record buying)
Top 40. audience, awakened the interest of
ersons in. front of the the major labels. That previously
ne are as diverse as the alternative music may now be
hey spin. Disc jockeys in- labelled "mainstream" is beginning
h students.and non-students to have reverse effects on college
rom Nigerian-born Gabriel, radio,according to Simonian.
jazz/blues afficionado " "It's kind of interesting now that
the industry has suddenly woken
up, (and) is buying every new wave
band off the street," he says.
"Maybe this (music) isn't alter-
native anymore. Since I've been at
By Ben Ticho the station, there's been this clump
of music that's just like 'our
iho recently did a public- territory'."
ats Waller program from "And now Warner Bros. owns it,"
or of his own home. comments Regina.
adcasting career of a CBN Still, there are plenty of underex-
ast" anywhere from a few posed and quality groups for CBN
to several years. Two DJs to draw upon, and not only
ing veterans are Regina within the realm of rock. The station
d Tom Simonian, who boasts an excellent selection of jazz
form the station's music programs, and has weekly meetings
ip. of an inter-staff jazz group, led by
imonian is one of CBN's Arwulf.
esmen. A former member Furthermore, CBN is an impor-
tion's board of directors, tant outlet for live and local music,
first got involved in radio ieaturing numerous simulcasts
s a junior, acting on the throughout the year from area bars.
n of a theatre prof who The special Sunday night "Studio
ie was "singing a lot." Live" program showcases all-
raduated in 1977 with the original music by local bands like
nct Radio/TV degree Non Fiction and the Stress Babies.
by the infamous Com- Because of its varied, and often
ns major), Simonian still bizarre programming (I once
s every Sunday, on the listened to an hour of different
"Synthescapes." He has "Over the Rainbow" versions), CBN
to300shows. is sometimes accused of being
ow a graduate student in overly eclectic.
nning came to CBN as a Simonian responds: "There are
e undergraduate in 1979. probably lots of people who don't
ne Music Director during hear the one kind of music they
wing year, succeeding want to hear, which is commercial
Kremen who, Myer says, rock 'n roll. And even then they can
very hard in making the hear that every once in a blue moon.
sible in the college radio We don't absolutely demand that
)ughout the country." people don't play that stuff."
'cognition is essential to "It's a - matter of taste and
continual supply of new discretion," adds Myer."The Police
station listeners. WCBN had a very huge record and so did
around $10,000 annually Michael Jackson this year, and both
Jniversity, a figure which, of those records do stand on their
ating expenses, precludes own merits, but does CBN need to
irchases. The station is focus on records like that, when
dependent on record com- they're on a lot of other radio
promotional albums. stations? Sometimes the music is
N difference, 'and much very good, but, do you have to hear it
ian and Myer's respon- ten times a day?"
s in establishing and main- Close quotes
ntact with a vast number So why does CBN play what it
dent record labels, which does?
k commercial exposure. Regina: To expose people to things
ties benefit: the radio that they just can't hear. I don't

ts free records and the want to sound like were educationa),
get free promotion. because music can be a lot of fun.. .
omotional impact goes Tom: I think we try more than a Jot
in Arbor, too, because the of stations to be educational, though.
)orts what current records Regina: But it's' not like we're
three different national being pedantic about it.
ons of college radio Tom: If you're playing all this stuff
College Media Journal, that people generally don't hear, it's
and the Gavin Report. As nice to have some kind of conceptual
'rves, "Every so often we thing-to hold onto, where the music
er (from a record com- comes from, or what it means, the
t says, 'Saw your playlist people who make it.
iblication, and we think ' Listen closely, you'll hear it. And a
terested."' lot more.

Daily Photo by DEBORAH LEWIS

Altman at Martha Cooke

Robert Altman plays both producer and director of 'Secret Honor: The Last Testament of Richard M. Nixon.' Altman
produced the play, now appearing at the Mendelssohn Theater, and will direct the movie version, to be filmed next week
at Martha Cooke dormitory. The director's work can also be seen at the State Theater, where his new movie
'Streamers' opens tomorrow. Altman appeared at a press conference following the sneak preview of 'Streamers'
Tuesday afternoon.
Hopwood winners named,

Diana
R oss
repayS
NYC
NEW YORK (AP) - Singer Diana
Ross, wearing a Parks Department
parka, on Wednesday gave New York
City the $250,000 she had pledged for a
playground in Central Park.
The check fulfilled a promise Ross
made last summer-when she staged a
free outdoor concert. The playground
was supposed to have been paid for.
from the proceeds of the concert, but"
the promoters have not reported any
profit.
"Although the concert has been
reported to have been unprofitable,:
)Diana Ross cares too much about New,
York and its people to let that stand in
the way of fulfilling her commitment of
this city," said Mayor Edward Koch.

(Continued from Page 1)
stipend ranging from $26,000 to $60,000
to "exceptionally talented people." It is
intended to free the winners from
economic pressures in the hope they
will make significant contributions to
society.
When he received the award, Gaddis
was working on a novel, That Time Of
,Year.
Gaddis would not comment on the
progression of the novel, but said he
hoped, given his age, he would not
repeat the twenty year interval that
separated his first and second novels.
Essay contest winners were Residen-
tial College Sophomore John Anderson,
$250; Residential College Freshman
Lucas Wolf, $250; LSA Freshman
Richard Feldman, $200; and Residen-
tial College Sophomore Susan Laurie
Jones, $200.
Fiction contest winners were
Elizabeth Noll, a Residential College
Sophomore, $250; Angus Woodward, a
IINDIVIDUAL THEATRES,
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MON. TH;RV FRI. 1:00 P.M. MATINEES
$2.00 SHOWS BEFORE 600 P.M.
ENDS TONIGHT!
"LONLEY HEARTS" (R) at 1:00, 7:15, 9:30
STARTS FRI. (R)
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WINNER LA FILM CRITICS
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SHIRLEY DEBRA JACK
MacLAINE WINGER 0NICHOLSON
THURS. 1:00, 7:00, 9:30
FRI. T:00, 7:00, 9:25

Residential College Sophomore, '$250;
David Steingold, an LSA Freshman,
$150; and Laura Saaf, a Residential
College Sophomore, $100.
Winners in the poetry contest were
School of Music Sophomore Laurie
Ochsner, $250; LSA Freshman Angel
Ssengoba; LSA Sophomore Jody
Becker, $200 ; and LSA Sophomore
Janice Leach, $200.
The English Department also awar-
ded several other prizes at the day's
ceremonies. Winners were LSA Senior
Allison Salerno, The Academy of
American Poets Prize,:$1000. LSA
Junior Gary Alan Gowen, Bain
Swiggett Poetry Prize, $75; Rackham
student Shelton Arnel Johnson, $100;
and Residential College Senior Laura
PIANO
DROPOUTS
HOW TO PLAY THE PIANO
DESPITE YEARS OF LESSONS
Two years of testing have produced
a new course in making music. This
course is based on an amazing
breakthrough in piano instruction,
and it is intended for people who can
at least read and play a simple mel-
ody line of notes.
This new technique teaches.you to
unlock your natural ability to make
music. You will learn how to take any
melody and play it a variety of ways:
rock, folk, swing, jazz, sem i-clsi
cal, bolero . . . you name it . . . just
for the sheer joy of it! By the end of
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Come and experi'ence this revolu-
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back to the piano.
FREE DEMONSTRATION
Monday, January 23
From 7-8 p.m. at
King's Keyboard House,
115 E. Liberty in
downtown Ann Arbor.
FOR MORE INFORMATION
CONTACT:
Learning
Network
617 E. University.#260
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104
313/ 996-9667
The Ann Arbor Learning Network (AALN) is a private com-
munity education program. This program wos formerly
administered by the University of Michigan as the U-M
Courses for Adult Education. (UMCAE).

Kasischke, $75, for the Michael R. Gut-
terman Award in Poetry,Rackham
student Janet Mackie Hackel, $750;
LSA Senior Christine Van Raalte, $750;
Rackham student Adam Brooke Davis,
$500; Rackham student Alyson Carol
Hagy, $500; and U-M Flint Senior
Joseph Matuzak, $500,'The Roy W.
Cowden Memorial Fellowship.

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