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December 09, 1983 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-12-09

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I

The Michigan Daily - Friday, December 9, 1983 - Page 3

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SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) - Bad batches
Of ,synthetic heroinhave produced
Parkinson's disease symptoms in more
than 120 people in the San Francisco
1ay area, leaving some frozen with
paralysis, doctors said yesterday.
'The effects of the toxic chemical,
concocted in illicit laboratories and sold
As ;inexpensive heroin, has reached
4pioemic proportions, said Dr. J.
Williams Langston, chief of neurology
it Santa Clara Valley Medical Center.
At least 100 more cases are suspected,
le said.
I HOWEVER, doctors said the
iiseovery could lead to a better under-
4tanding of Parkinson's disease, which
afflicts more than 500,000 Americans
with muscle stiffness, memory loss,
isual or speech problems and a
gerieral slowing of body movements.
The disease usually strikes people over
ige 60.
Langston said the Parkinson's sym-
Otoms can strike days, weeks, months or
Hv'APPE

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more than a year after injection of the
bad substance. The material can be
manufactured so it looks just like real
heroin. But unlike heroin, it gives a
burning sensation when injected, he
said.
The first batch of synthetic heroin cir-
culated in the San Jose area, about 50
miles south of San Francisco, from
December 1981 to August 1982, leading
Langston to scores of victims. One
man's symptoms were so severe he was
unable, without continuous medication,
to move any part of his body except his
eyeballs.
LANGSTON said three new cases of
the malady surfaced during the last two
weeks, apparently from a new batch of
bad synthetic heroin.
In what may be the only positive note
in the tragedy, doctors also found that
MPTP kills cells in a 2-inch-long area at
the base of the brain called the substan-
tia nigra - the identical section of the
brain destroyed by Parkinson's
disease.

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Highlight
It wouldn't be the holiday season without the annual visit of Charles
Dickens to read "A Christmas Carol." Ehglish Prof. Bert Hornbeck perfor-
'ms the traditional Christmas tale at the Museum of Art at 8 p.m., followed
by caroling, punch, and cookies. A concert by the Cantabile Brass will
;precede the reading when the doors open at 7:30 p.m. Admission is free.
Filmns
AAFC - Monty Python's Meaning of Life, 7 & 9 p.m., Nat. Sci. Aud.
Alternative Action - Ragtime, 6:45 & 9:20 p.m., MLB 4.
Mediatrics - Trading Places, 7 & 9 p.m., MLB 3.
Cinema Guild - On the Waterfront, 7 p.m., The Men, 9 p.m.
CFT- To Have and Have Not, 7:10 & 11 p.m., The Big Sleep, 9 p.m.,
Michigan Theater.
Cinema II- Catch-22, 7 & 9:15 p.m., Angell Aud. A.
Performanes
Ark -Gamble Rogers, 8 p.m., 1421 Hill.
UAC-Soph Show, "Godspell." 10 p.m., Mendelssohn Theater.
School of Music - Trumpet recital, Dean Snogren, 6 p.m., Recital Hall;
University Choir and Wind Ehsemble, 8 p.m., Hill; piano recital, Carol
$now, 8 p.m., Recital Hall.
Ann Arbor Chamber Orchestra -Holiday concert, 8 p.m., league.
Black Sheep Theater - "Bullshot Cummond," 8:15 p.m., 138 E Main,
Manchester.
Musical Theater Program -"She Loves Me,"8 p.m., Residential College
auditorium.
Second Chance -Bitter Sweet Alley.
Performance Network - "Waiting for Godot," 8 p.m., 408 W.
EIU-"Impulse," a winter dance concert, 8 p.m.,Roosevelt Auditorium.
Speakers
South and Southeast Asian Studies - Brown bag lecture, John Whit-
mnore, "Vietnam, the TV History: True or false?" noon, Lane Hall Commons
:Rm.
American fliends Service Committee - Ron Young, "United States
Policy- in the Middle Fist and Central America: Differences and
Similarities,"7 :30 p.m., 1420 Hill.
Meetings
The Kwon Do Club -Practice, 5 p.m., CCRB Martial Arts Rm.
Duplicate Bridge Club - Open club championship game, 7:15 p.m.,
League.
Chinese Students Christian Fbllowship - Bible study meeting, 9 p.m.,
Campus Chapel.
Ann Arbor Chinese Bible Class -7:30 p.m., University Reformed Church.
Michigan Ebonomic Society -5:30 p.m., Dick Cleary and Bob Barbera
ffomE F. Hutton, 101 Lorch.
Miscellaneous
Russian and Est Ebropean Studies - Student and Faculty Association
wine and cheese reception, 4:30-6:30 p.m., Lane Hall Commons Rm.
Michigan Ebonomic Society -'Tutoring for Eton classes, Markley Peer
Academic Counseling Office, West Quad Minority ILunge, South Quad
West Desk, 8-10 p.m.
Museum of Art -Art Break, Barb Krause, "Woodcut," 12:10 p.m., W.
Gallery.
Hockey -Michigan vs. FErris State, 7:30 p.m., Yost.
Fblk Dance Club -Macedonian dances, 8-9:30 p.m., followed by request
dancing until midnight, 3rd floor dance studio, corner of State and
William.
See HAPPENINGS, Page 7
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109

Striker memorial - APPhoto
One of an estimated 250 protesters chants in front of the Greyhound terminal
in Cleveland, Ohio Wednesday afternoon as striking Greyhound workers and
member of sympathizing unions rallied in a memorial for Ray Phillips, the
Greyhound driver killed on a picket line Monday in Zanesville.
Defendant skips
assault trial.

By ERIC MATTSON
Robert Higgins, an Ann Arbor resid-
ent who was charged with assault with
a deadly weapon in connection with a
gay pride rally last June, failed to ap-
pear in court yesterday and a warrant
has been issued for his arrest.
The trial has been adjourned until
Tuesday at 9 a.m. Ann Arbor police and
the Wastenaw County sheriff's depar-
tment said last night Higgins had not
been brought into custody.
HIGGINS HAS been charged with
waving a rifle at the rally outside the
Federal Building in Ann Arbor after he
engaged in verbal arguments with par-
ticipants.

Higgins' lawyer, Seymour Floyd,
arrived in Washtenaw County Circuit
Court at 9:10 a.m. yesterdayand
found that his client had not arrived.
When Higgins hadn't made it by 9:30
a.m., Judge Henry Conlin said that if
Higgins did not show up within 45
minutes, a warrant would be issued for
his arrest.
Floyd, who said he is Higgins' fourth
lawyer since the arrest last June, said
his client did appear at jury selection
proceedings Monday.
If convicted on the assault charge,
Higgins faces up to four years in prison
or a $2,000 fine.

Reagan says U.S.
schools need reform

Sc
AR
ON

From AP and UPI
INDIANAPOLIS - President
Reagan, declaring that America's
schools must be "temples of learning,
not drug dens," called yesterday for
stricter classroom discipline and un-
veiled a program of presidential
academic awards.
The president, in a speech prepared
for delivery before an education sum-
mit of 2,300 teachers, school ad-
ministrators, politicians, parents and
teachers' union representatives, said
he had ordered the Justice and
Education departments "to find ways
we can help teachers and ad-
ministrators enforce discipline."
CRITICIZING suggestions that more
money was needed to improve the
nation's schools, Reagan said that total
money for schools was up almost 7 per-
cent over the past year. This increase
stems from greater state and local
spending, rather than a greater federal
contribution.
"America's schools don't need vast
new sums of money as much as they
need a few fundamental reforms,"
Reagan said in his remarks prepared
for his appearance before a National
Forum on Excellence in Education.
The New York Times, quoting

Education Department officials, repor-
ted that the president's next education
budget would be between the $15.2
billion approved by Congress this year
and the $13.5 billion the administration
had projected.
BUT THE nation's two major
teachers' unions, the National
Education Association anti the America
Federation of Teachers, reacted with
disdain.
Mary Futrell, president of the 1.7
million-member NEA, said, "President
Reagan today offered the nation's
educators nothing but a packaged ver-
sion of the same old entpty rhetoric."
American Federation of Teachers
President Albert Shanker, who was not
at the forum, issued a statement saying
Reagan must "do more than spill
rhetoric on the laps of the American
public." But Shanker added, "we share
the president's concern about school
discipline and the threat on teacher
authority."
Reagan outlined a six-point program,
including "good, old-fashioned
discipline," eradication of drug and
alcohol abuse, "good teaching," raising
academic standards, return to local
control of schools, and an emphasis on
"the basics."

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