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December 06, 1983 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-12-06

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4

Page 10 -The Michigan Daily -Tuesday, December 6, 1983
How 'bout them

Wolves!

(Continued from Page 1)
hand in the big win. Most notably, Tim
McCormick and Butch Wade who not-
ched career-highs of 25 and 17 points
respectively.
"I'm really proud of our kids," said
the jubiliant fourth year coach. "They
hung in there and made the big plays
and bigbaskets. If this was last year's
team they would have found a way to
lose it."
AND WADE exemplified what a dif-
ference a year can make. The 6-7 for-
ward grabbed 11 rebounds in addition to
his career high tally as he spearheaded
the Wolverines inside game which
proved to be the difference.
"Butch gave us a big lift. He played
the game of his life," said Frieder.
And Wade couldn't agree more.
"IT'S A GREAT feeling," said Wade.
"We knew the big men had three fouls
so we wanted to go inside and that
proved the difference."
The Wolverines had to overcome a
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case of the early jitters, Georgia's
torrid outside shooting and a vociferous
Georgia crowd down the stretch to
preserve their win. After a sloppy first
half which saw Michigan turn the ball
over seven times the team seemed to
gain its poise in the second stanza.
Led by the outside tandem of fresh-
man Antoine Joubert (eight points, six
assists, three steals) and Leslie
Rockymore (13 points, five assists, two
steals) Michigan was able to pull
Georgia out of its tough man-to-man
defense with some outside jumpers.
.BUT MORE importantly, the guards'
success allowed McCormick and Wade
to take over inside.
"We were not competitive enough in-
side," said a downcast Georgia coach
Hugh Durham. "Wade got 17 and Mc-
Cormick got 25. We took 15 point
average players and turned them into
42 point performers. They dominated us
inside."
Ironically, this Michigan team, which
Wo -men
Cippewas
shoot
for
Wolverines

outrebounded the Bulldogs 34-27, was
the same ballclub which was getting
beaten inside by the likes of Toledo and
Central Michigan.
"I' think we were rising to the oc-
casion and played up to the level of
competition tonight and that was good
to see," said Frieder. "We had a good
defensive effort and we did a very good
job on Banks and Fleming without let-
ting anyone else on their team hurt us."
.It would have been frightening to see

what the All-American duo might have
done against a bad Michigan defensive
effort. The pair notched 48 points with
Fleming's 25 point performance
leading the team.
But as Banks noted, it just wasn't
Georgia's night.
"We just didn't do the job tonight,"
said the 6-6 forward. "They did a good
job of sagging back inside, they had
good guards and did a good job."
Indeed it, was Michigan's night.

Dawgs gone

MICHIGAN
Min FG/A FT/A R A PF TP

GEORGIA J
MinFG/AFT/A R

A PF TP

Henderson........9 0/0 0/0 2 0

0 0

Banks .............38 11/19 1/3
Corhen ............37 1/3 2/2
Hitchcock.......... 9 0/0 0/0
Crosby.............29 4/8 0/0
Fleming.........33 9/20 7/8
McMillan.......... 13 0/1 2/2
Hartry.............18 2/5 0/0
Rainey.............21 1/2 0/0
Ward .............. 2 1/1 0/0
TOTALS...........200 29/59 12/15

2
8
2
0
7
0
3
4
27

3
0
2
3
2
1
0,
0
12

0
4
3
3
4
0
3
4
0
21

23
4
0
8
25
2
4
2
2
70

Rellford........... 16 3/3
McCormick ....... 38 10/12
Rockymore........ 33 4/12
Turner.............18 0/6
Joubert..........24 3/6
Pelekoudas........ 14 1/1
Tarpley............12 1/2
Wade.............. 36 8/10
TOTALS...........200 30/52

0/0
5/8
5/6
0/0
2/2
1/2
2/2
1/5
16/25

1
12
1
0
2
2
3
11
'34

2
2
5
1
6
2
0
19
19

4
3
1
4
2
0
2
17

6
25
13
0
8
3
4
17
76

Halftime score: MICHIGAN 35, Georgia 32
Attendance: 4,160

xo,
............................ . ... ..
....................
xX x

By ROB POLLARD
Fasten your seat belts. The running
and gunning Central Michigan Chip-
pewas are coming to town and the
defending Mid-American Conference
champs will be a tall order for the
Wolverines.
"My preference is to play a pressure
defense and force the opposition into
mistakes anywhere on the court," said
Chippewa coach Laura Golden. "If I
can recruit speed, we'll run from the
time we leave the lockerroom. I like
excitement from end line to end line!"
This year's Chippewa squad is best
suited for the run-and-gun style of play.
"Our strengths are definitely speed and
quickness," said Golden. "Our
weakness is our lack of height."
Lost to graduation were Central's two
leading scorers, and this year's team
has only two players over six feet tall.
Leading the Chippewas is 6-1
sophomore center Latanga Cox, who
led the team in rebounding a year ago.
Seniors Patty Weidman and Denise
Tower anchor the front line, and junior,
guard Sylvia Odum uses her quickness
to force the opposition into mistakes.
The Chips are 1-2 so far this season, a
disappointing start for a team which

qualified for the NCAA tournament last
year, losing to Maryland in the opening
round. Michigan is 0-1, having lost their
opener on Saturday to a Western
Michigan team that finished 0-18 in the
MAC last year.
Michigan coach Gloria Soluk feels the
Wolverines will be a different team
against Central. "I think you'll see a
different ballgame on Tuesday. These
kids have one under their belt now."
One thing that will be different is the
tempo of the game.
"Our game plan is to run the fast
break. We try to fast break and press
the entire game," said CMU assistant
coach Trish Roberts. "We think we can
beat Michigan if we come ready to
play."
Soluk has to be hoping that Michigan
can come ready to play-defense.
Michigan's defense against Western
was less than stubborn. Defensive
specialist Lori fnatkowski, who has the
task of guarding the opposing ball han-
dler, picked up three quick fouls and
was not a factor in the game.
If the Chippewas can maintain a fast
pace tonight, Michigan 6-7 freshman
center Lynn Morozko will not be effec-
tive.

AP Photo
Silver streak
Detroit running back Billy Sims carries the ball in the first quarter of last
night's game against Minnesota at the Silverdome. The Lions and Vikings
were tied for the NFC Central Division lead going into the contest.
'M' swimmers start

season wit]
By MIKE REDSTONE
In a meet attended by Olympic
hopefuls from 17 different countries,
the Michigan men's swimming team
came away with three first place
finishes and ninth place overall in the 35
team field.
This weekend's Canada Cup meet
held in Torono was primarily used as a
preseason warmup for the Wolverines,
according to head coach Jon Urban-
chek.
URBANCHEK, however, was
pleased with the relay team of Mark
Noetzel, Kirstan Vandersluis, Dave
Kerska and Joe Parker, which finished
first in both the 200 and 400 meter
freestyle relays.

STU DENT
ACCOUNTS
Your attention is called to the
following rules passed by the
Regents at their meeting on
February 28, 1936: "Students
shall pay all accounts due the
University no later than the
last day of classes of each
semester or summer session.
Student loans which are not
paid or renewed are subject
to this regulation; however,
student loans not yet due are.
exempt. Any unpaid accounts
at the close of business on
the last day of classes will be
reported to the Cashier of the
University and
"(a) All academic credits
will be withheld, the grades
for the semester or summer
session just completed will
not be released; and no
transcript of credits will be
issued..
"(b) All students owing
such accounts will not be
allowed to register in any
subsequent semester or sum-
mer session until payment
has been made."

Blue tumblers finish
strong second in Va.

a splash
won the 50-meter freestyle in a time of
23.64 seconds.
DESPITE THE ninth place finish,
Urbanhcek emphasized that Michigan
went to the meet simply to get some e
perience during the preseason.
"This is a good meet because it gives
everyone on the team a chance to swim
in several events," said Urbanchek. "A
meet like this also gives us a good idea
of what we still have to do during our
conditioning season."
The Wolverines now have over a
month to ready themselves for their fir
st Big Ten meet against Wisconsin on
Jan. 13.in Madison.4
Swimmers orermatched
in Canada
Jane Esselsty finished 11th and 16th
in the ' 100 and 50 meter backstroke
events 'to pace the Michigan women's
swim team at the Canada Cup meet i
Toronto last weekend.
Naomi Marubashi and Melinda Copp,
who are redshirting this year to try ou
for the Canadian Olympic team, also
placed' in freestyle and backstroke
events' but not for Michigan's team.
MARUBASHI finished fourth in the
100 meter freestyle and 10th in the 20
meter race while Copp took sixth in the
200 meter backstroke. f
Coach Peter Lindsay was not disap
pointed despite the fact that Esselstyr
was the only swimmer on this year's
team to place in the top 16 at the meet.
"Although our performances weren4
in the top finished in the meet, we wer
competitiveawith the other women'
collegiate teams that are in a sirnilai
point in their training," said Lindsay.
- MIKE REDSTONI

By SUSAN BROSER
The Michigan men's gymnastics
team finished second out of 14 com-
petitors in the Eagle All-Around Classic'
in Alexandria, Virginia this weekend.
The Wolverine's youth and talent was
displayed as freshmen Brock Orwig
and Mitch Rose led the squad in all-
around performances. Individual effor-
ts by Rich Landman and Rose also con-
tributed to the Wolverine's success.
Even though senior captain Merrick
Horn and freshman Gavin Meyerowitz
were out with injuries, Michigan still
managed to finish second with a score
of 150.2. Southern Connecticut took top
honors with William and Mary
following behind Michigan in third
place and Temple University finishing
fourth.
ORWIG WAS the top gymnast for the
Wolverines, placing fourth with an all-
around performance score of 49.05 and
Rose followed his teammate with a
46.55. Landman and Rose also helped
the Wolverines, finishing with in-
dividual season high scores. Landman
scored his season high on the floor
exercise with a 9.55 and Rose excelled
on the rings with a 9.35.
Coach Bob Darden is pleased with his
team's performance so far this season,
since the team finished first in the
Buckeye Invitational and now second
this past weekend.

"I thought our guys did a good job
overall," said Darden. "Especially if
you consider that we only used fresh-
men and sophomores. Gavin
Meyerowitz strained his back during
warmups so he was limited to just one
event. Otherwise we would have had a
good shot at finishing first."
Woien r opph Kent S it.e
The women's gymnastics team will
enter the Wolverine Invitational this
Sunday with a 2-0 record, after this
weekend's first-place finish at Kent
State. The Wolverines were led by
Kathy Beckwith, Christy Schwartz and
Dayna Samuelson.
Three teams competed in -the Ohio
meet, with Michigan taking the top two
all-around titles, finishing first with a
total score of 170.15. Kent State
followed with a 169.75 and Central
Michigan placed third with 158.1.
THE MICHIGAN gymnasts were led
by Beckwith who placed first with a 34.9
while her teammate, junior co-captain
Schwartz second with a 34.25.
Coach Sheri Hyatt and her team are
looking ahead to the Wolverine In-
vitational in Ann Arbor this weekend,
and Hyatt feels that the Kent State win
showed the team's improvement.
"It was a good warm up meet for us,
we always have a close meet when we
go to Kent State," said Hyatt. "I was
pleased with Kathy and Christy
especially and we had some sparkling
performances from our specialists."
- SUSAN BROSER

,yFt
3a..

N'oetal
... wins two relays
"Our first place finishes in the relays
were pretty respectable, even though
many of the teams didn't enter relays,"
said Urbanchek. "This is mostly a meet
for individuals."
The biggest surprise of the meet for
Urbanchek came when Kerska also

SPORTS OF THE DAIL Y

ia
Tigrs rad. away Pashnick

,.

NASHVILLE, TENN. (AP) - The
Detroit Tigers announced yesterday
they have acquired outfielder Rusty
Kuntz from the Minnesota organization
in exchange for another minor leaguer,
right handed pitcher Larry Pashnick.
Kuntz, who was on the roster of
Toledo in the International League, was
assigned to the roster of Evansville in
the American Association. Pashnick,

THE TURKEY IS WAITING

jc

who was with Evansville, was assigned
to Toledo.
KUNTZ, 28, split time between the
Chicago White Sox and Twins in 1983. In
59 games, he batted .211 with three
homers and six RBI. He has played i
parts of five major league seasons.
Reds re-acquire Perez
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) - The Cin-
cinnati Reds acquired 41-year-old Tony
Perez from the Philadelphia Phillies
yesterday in exchange for a player to
be named later.
Last season hebatted .241 with.si
home'- runs 'and 43 RBIs for
Philadelphia, appearing in 91 games.
He has .369 home runs, 1,575 RBIs and a
.280 average for his capeer.

THE TREE WILL BE TRIMMED
O WILL YOU BE THERE?
NOT WITHOUT A RIDE!,

I

Stop By The Emblem Shop
TO Pick Up
Your Last-Minute

I

"air But"
2 for 1

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1 'AdCN.

Holiday Gifts!

ICN

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