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December 06, 1983 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-12-06

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Page 6 - The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, December 6, 1983
Soviets deman d

U.S.

concessions

in missile talks

MOSCOW (AP) - Top Kremlin of-
ficials yesterday rejected Western
"wishful thinking" that the Soviet
Union might return to Euromissile
negotiations without U.S. concessions
first. They said U.S.-Soviet strategic
arms talks are headed toward a simnilar
stalemate.
The Soviets, at a rare news conferen-
ce for foreign and Soviet reporters, also
reaffirined Moscow's intention to mat-
ch the new U.S. medium-range missiles
in Europe with powerful Soviet sub-
marine missiles off the American
coast.
THESE COUNTER-weapons will
"be no less effective than the American
systems deployed in Europe, in range,
yield, accuracy and what is especially
important, in flight time to their
targets," said Marshal Nikolai
Ogarkov, chief of the Soviet general
staff.
Ogarkov was joined in the news con-
ference by First Deputy Foreign
Minister Georgi Kornienko and Leonid
Zamyatin, chief of the Kremlin's Inter-
national Information Department.
On Nov. 23, the Soviets suspended the
negotiations in Geneva, Switzerland, on
medium-range weapons in Europe af-
ter new U.S. missiles arrived in Britain
and West Germany, part ,of a NATO
deployment designed to counter Soviet
SS-20 missiles targeted on Western
Europe.,
WESTERN diplomats who attended'
yesterday's news conference said it ap-
peared the Soviets wanted to forcefully
rebut Western suggestions that the
NATO deployment had not radically
changed the situation and that the
Soviets might be willing to rejoin the
talks.

Kornienko referred to West German
Chancellor Helmut Kohl's recent
statement that a letter he received
from Andropov indicated the Soviets
might return to the bargaining table
even with the new NATO missiles in
place. .
"You have to have a very rich fan-
tasy and imagination" to draw that
conclusion from Soviet statements,
Kornienko said. He said Western
leaders were trying to mislead their
own people through "wishful thinking.."
INSTEAD, Kornienko said, before
the Soviets return to the suspended
talks the West must signal it is ready to
plull back on the missile deployment.
He quoted Andropov as, saying the
Kremlin would not consider its Geneva
walkout irreversible "if the NATO
countries show a readiness to return to
the situation that existed before the
deploymeht in Europe of American
missiles."
The Soviet officials repeatedly drew a
link between the Strategic Arms
Reduction Talks (START) and .the
suspended Euromissile negotiations.,
Ogarkov accussed the United States of
not having bargained seriously in the
Euromissile sessions, and added:
"By the way, this is also the approach
of the United States at the talks on
limiting !and reducing strategic arms.
The question arises whether the
Americans understand the absurdity of
their START proposals."
He said the situation in the
Euromissile talks "is well-known and in
START the matters are heading in the
same direption."
They made no direct threat to walk
out of the strategic-arms talks.k

Williams'
conviction
upheld in
Atlanta
slayings'
ATLANTA (AP) - The Georgia Sup-
reine Court yesterday upheld the mur-
der convictions and consecutive life
sentences given Wayne Williams in 1982
for the slayings of two of 29 young
blacks whose deaths were investigated
by a special police task force.
The seven-member court
unanimously rejected a defense
challenge to the prosecution's use of
evidence from 10 slayings in which
Williams was not charged. Prosecutors
charged that the cases established a
pattern.
THE COURT also rejected a conten-
tion that the state failed to demonstrate
the scientific reliability of comparisons
of tiny fibers found in Williams' home
and car on the bodies of the victims.
The court also rejected 32 other
alleged trial court errors in its 81-page
opinion, written by Justice Richard
Bell. All inembers of the court joined in
the opinion, except Justice George
Smith, who concurred in the judgment
only.
Williams, 25, was convicted in
February 1982 of two counts of murder
in the slayings of Nathaniel Cater, 27,
and Jimmy Ray Payne, 21, two of 29
young blacks whose deaths during a 22-
month period were investigated by a
special police task force.
After he was sentenced to two con-
secutive life terms, Atlanta-area
authorities publicly blamed the young
black man for 22 of the other slayings,
although he never was charged in any
of those cases.

4

AP Photo
Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger shakes hands yesterday with U.S. soldiers in Hohenfels, West Germany. Wein-
berger then travelled to Brussels, Belgium for a two-day meeting of NATO defense ministers.
Weinberger addresses NATO

BRUSSELS, Belgium (UPI) - Secretary of Defense
Caspar Weinberger called on NATO allies yesterday to
stengthen their conventional defenses even as the first
medium-range nuclear missiles are deployed in Europe.
"NATO stood very firm and fast (on the deployment issue)
during a long period of heavy pressure brought against it
from a number of sources," Weinberger said on arriving
from West Germany for a two-day meeting of NATO defense
ministers.
"Now that deployment.. .is proceeding on schedule, we can
turn to some of the other vital matters, such as improving our
conventional strength, taking advantage of emerging
technologies," he said.
AS WEINBERGER arrived, European allies were
assessing their defense efforts, focusing on cooperation bet-

ween armed. forces, joint training programs, armvaments
planning and logistics.
Norwegian Defense Minister Anders Sjaastad presided
over a session of ambassadors of the Eurogroup, an
association of all the European NATO states except France,
which does not participate in the integrated command, and
Iceland, which has no army.
The Europeans are scheduled to finish their separate con-
clave today, and be joined later in the day by their U.S. and
Canadian colleagues for a full meeting of NATO defense
,ministers.%
The European allies discussed a publicity effort to make
their defense contribution better known in the United States.
The Europeans want U.S. television networks to show a half-
hour documentary on the subject next year.
A U.S. official admitted European nations "are doing more
than they are generally credited for. On basis ofcomparison,
however, many European nations are not making an effort
comparable to that of the United States."

I

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SACUA pursues conference
( Continued from Page 1)
similar to issues' which might be professors, where much of Penatgon-
discussed at the conference." sponsored research on campus is done.
According to Hildebrandt, SACUA SACUA felt that a conflict could be
will ask CIVS what the content of the avoided by planning a forum that
conference might be, who should be in- deals with more than just military
vited, and whether the conference research. The committee suggested
should be local, national, or inter- that issues such as the role of the
national. government in research should also be
If CIVS views the proposal favorably, discussed.
Hildebrandt said SACUA will then "WE HAVE TO DEAL with global
bring the issue to the attention of the topics too," Brown said. "There are
Senate Assembly, although the assem- many issues to be dealt with. We don't
bly will not vote on the plan. want to devote the whole conference to
"SACUA HAS sensed the need for a oneissue."
conference anl will assume a leader- Hildebrandt said a meeting yester-
ship role," Hildebrandt said, explaining day with the University's executive of-
that the committee sees no reason to ficers indicated their approval of the
make a formal proposal to the Assem- idea. He said the administration may
bly. also be willing to offer financial sup-
Hildebrandt said, however, that port.
faculty opinions will be considered. Af- Bassett's proposal was also a topic of
ter Bassett's, request at the November discussion at a recent meeting of the
meeting, Hildebrandt received 28 deans of the University's schools and
negative comments from faculty mem- colleges. Although the minutes of the
bers and only two positive remarks. He meeting were not made public,
noted,'though, that most of the negative Hildebrandt said that the deans' reac-
comments were from engineering tion was "mixed."

i

4

Court takes c
( Continued from Page 1)
President Jimmy Carter in 1980, and
required all male citizens and resident
aliens between ages 18 and 26 to notify
selective Service.
The law, aimed at making it easier to
draft young men if that becomes
necessary, requires all men born after
Jan. 1, 1963, to register within 30 days
before or after their 18th birthday.

iraft-aid ease
There are criminal penalties for not
tcomplying.
The proof-of-registration law took ef-
feet Sept. 30, and in early October the
government for the first time in eight
years began issuing draft cards to those
men who registered.

AP Photo
Over load
A flat-bed truck sits on its side after attempting a tight curve on the 1-75
overpass in Detroit yesterday. The driver was killed in the accident.

Daily staff writer Glen
contributed to this story.

Young-

The Michigan Gamma Chapter of
The Tau Beta Pi Association
NATIONAL ENGINEERING HONOR SOCIETY

4

Would like to welcome its new members:

Dawn Albrecht
Brooke Anderson
Ted Barnett
Janet Bednarski
Phillip Berry
James Bielicki
Robert Bonomo
Lisa Bowers
Steve Brouwer
James Campbell
Cynthia Chomic
D. J. Chung
Edward Cline
Ben David
David DePaoli
Ray Dornbusch
Mw,:n cr..n

Santo Foti
Karl Freter
Freddy Geraldo
Larry Godt
Julie Goodney
Eric Grupe
Lilly Handler
Bill Harokopus
Lars Helgeson
Glen Herman
Gary Hoch
Elaine Hoffman
Bryan Hubbell
James Kahn
David Kamm
John Kelly

Chip Levinson
Kurt Lloyd
Steve Lyzenga
Robert MacDonald
Catherine Maksymiuk
O
TA '

Lori Mirek
Roger Myers
Geok Ing Ng
Trung Lap Nguyen
Jeffrey Nieman,
Richard Oakley .
Jeffrey Omichinski
Carol Ozaki
Catherine Park
Steve Pastor
Lorelle Pflaum
Dave Poston
Frances Poy
David Raffo
Mark Randall '
James Reinders
Earl Renaud

Traci Sebo
Mark Shaw
Mark Sieben
Brent Simon
Reuben Slone
Terrance Smorch
George Jeep-Kung
David Soemarko
Greg Stewart
James Totte
Denise Travers
Binh Hoang
Don VanderLugt
Eric Vaughn
Robin Visser
Michael Vos
.II~I+ ake

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