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November 29, 1983 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-11-29

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The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, November 29, 1983 - Page 5

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Shamir,
Optimistic,
about
talks with
Reagan
WASHINGTON (AP) - Prime
minister Yitzhak Shamir raised Israeli
proposals with President Reagan
yesterday to strengthen U.S.-Israeli
military and economic ties and to coun-
ter what both nations say is a Soviet-
backed threat in Lebanon.
U.S. and Israeli officials said they
expected agreement on closer military
cooperation, such as building a U.S.
arms depot in Israel and joint military
exercises, as a signal to Syria and its
Soviet sponsors that they won't be given
a free hand in Lebanon.
AFTER AN initial 20-minute meeting
with Reagan and his key advisers in the
Oval Office, Shamir told reporters he
had "very friendly and good talks" and
voiced hope his three-day visit would
"contribute to the deepening and
strengthening of the friendly relations"
between the two nations.
A second meeting is set for today,
before, the arrival in Washington
tomorrow of Lebanese President Amin
Gemayel, who also is expected to seek
more U.S. aid.
White House Spokesman Larry
Speakes said Reagan stressed to
Shamir, "We will continue to improve
our cooperation with Israel while at the
same time continuing our relations with
moderate Arab states."
He said Reagan repeated to Shamir
that the president's Sept. 1, 1982 speech
calling for a Palestinian entity under
Jordanian supervision on the West
Bank "remains the key item in U.S.
policy.
"The United States and Israel are in
close accord for policy regarding
Lebanon, and we will continue to work
closely for the goals we all seek in
Lebanon," he said.
Currently, Israel has to repay only
$870 million of its $1.7 billion in U.S.
military aid.

INFO -OPEN HOUSE
OBSERVE DENTAL EDUCATION & VISIT
WITH FACULTY& STUDENTS
FLETCHER ST-LOBBY
Pre-Professional Services-
Career Planning 8 Placement-A Unit~f Student Services

PLEASE NOTE:.
Although it does not appear in the LSA Course
Guide for the Winter Term, History 467, The United
States Since 1933 (Professor Sidney Fine), will be of-
fered next term as specified in the Time Schedule. A
course description is available in 3609 Haven Hall and
in the undergraduate counseling office.
PRE-D
-ET

Greetings

AP Photo

Pope John Paul shakes hands with Lebanese President Amin Gemayel as they meet at the Vatican yesterday.

Justices to reviev
WASHINGTON (AP) - The Supreme Court said yesterday
it will decide whether drugs seized from public school studen-
ts in illegal searches by teachers or administrators may be
used as evidence when the students stand trial.
The justices voted to hear arguments that searches by
public school teachers or administrators are exempt from
the "exclusionary rule" banning illegally seized evidence
from criminal trials.
THE COURT'S decision some time by July in a case from
Piscataway, N.J., may spell out just how much privacy
students are entitled to while in school.
The controversy arose when on March 7, 1980 a 14-year-old
girl identified in court records only as T.L.O. was caught
smoking in a restroom at Piscataway High School.
Because smoking in non-designated areas such as
restrooms was against schools rules, the girl was taken to a
vice principal's office. While questioning her, the vice prin-
cipal dug through the girls purse and found records in-
dicating that she had been selling marijuana cigarettes to
her fellow students.
THE SCHOOL official notified police. The girl later was

V drug searches
tried as a juvenile, found to be delinquent and sentenced to
one year probation conditioned on her attending a drug-
therapy program.
The state Supreme Court, by a 5-2 vote, overturned the
delinquency finding after ruling that the girl's Fourth Amend-
dment rights against unreasonable searches had been
violated by the vice principal.
Returning from a two-week recess, the court also let stand
an absolute ban on commercial video games imposed by the
town of Marshfield, Mass.
Town officials praised a U.S. Supreme Court ruling saying
it means more than, just getting rid of the beeping, coin-
eating machines.
"WHAT IT really deals with is the right of a city to decide
what it will and will not permit in a community," said
Richard Levin, chairman of the town board of selectmen.
"That is the reason we have gone to the lengths we have."
Because of the Supreme Court's refusal to hear arguments
that the ban violates free-speech rights of players, merchan-
ts must get rid of the 50 or so video games sprinkled around
this South Shore town.

r

Frsmidays
FROM ANN ARBOR
EXPRESS
TO
METRO AIRPORT & DETROIT
LEAVING MICHIGAN UNION 11:00am
2:00pm
4:30pm
LEAVING YPSILANTI 11:25am
2:25pm
4:55pm
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE MICHIGAN UNION
763-2071

ADVICE changes format
to eliminate CRISP surveys
(Continued from Page 1)

$6.00

4

plagued by staffing problems, accor-
ding toLayman. "A lot of people were
quitting and working on other things
and the other project director quit. We
had to restructure," Layman said.
Nevertheless, he said, he is
optimistic about the project's future.
"Michigan has had program
evaluations since the late 1950s, and-
(ADVICE) has lasted the longest. It will
last beyond me," said Layman, who
has run the project for two years now.
He said another group of students are
now working ADVICE to contribute to
its long-term success.
Several students interviewed yester-
day expressed support for ADVICE's
plan of in-class survey's, though a few,
regretted that the guide arrived after
the first day of registration.

"I THINK it's a lotabetter in the
classroom,"Tom Ling, an LSA senior
said. "You spend more time doing it,
the questions (can be answered) in dep-
th, and everyone fills them out," he
said.
Another senior said he depends on
word of mouth and not publications for
his course selections. "I've been here
long enough that in my department I go
more on the evaluations from other
students," Brian Higgins said.
Because ADVICE was released late
this year, seniors who 'registered
yesterday couldn't use it. "I definitely
would have used it," William Huml
said. He added that it was nice not
having ADVICE people soliciting sur-
veys from students in CRISP lines.
"'It's less of a hassle," he said.

w

E'LL PAY YOUTO GT NTO
SHAPE, THIS SUMMER.'
If you have at least
two years of college left,
you can spend six weeksa
our Army ROTC Basic
Camp this summer and ea
approximately $600.
And if you qualify, yo

a
rn
)u

Reward of $3 million
Posted in stolen gold case

can enter the RKUTC 2L-
Year Program this fall and
receive up to $1,000 a year.
But the big payoff
happens on graduation day.
That's when you receive
an officer's commission.
So get your body in
shape (not to mention your
bank account).
Enrollin Army-ROTC.
For more information,
contact your Professor of
Military Science..
ARMY ROC.
BEALLYOU CAN BE.
CONTACT
MAJ. JIM DENT
t 764-2400/2401
NORTH HALL

} pr .,. .. ..

" (Continued from Page 3)
responses, Gordon said.
London's evening newspaper, the
-Standard, reported yesterday that
-Yard detectives "have no doubt" that
the raid was masterminded by the
same criminal or criminals who pulled
off the Security Express robbery,
Britain's biggest cash robbery. In that
operation, about 14 armed bandits
overpowered guards.
A SCOTLAND Yard spokesman
declined comment on the report linking
the two crimes.
Earlier in the day Cater said: "We
are looking for a good professional gang
who knew what they were after."
Police have said it was likely the gold
ingots stolen from the Brinks-Mat
security depot near London's Heathrow
'Airport might -already have been
melted down and smuggled abroad.

UNLESS MELTED, the gold could be
identified by refiners' stamps and
numbers marked on each ingot, police
say. The melted gold could be cast into
toys or some other items for smuggling.
The masked gunmen also snatched
$150,000-worth of cut and uncut diamon-
ds, an undisclosed amount of travelers'
checks and scrap gold, police said.
The gang handcuffed six security
4 guards, hit one of them over the head
with a pistol and doused another with
gasoline, threatening to set him afire.
Press Association, the British
domestic news agency, said detectives
theorized the bandits posed as security
guards, but police have said they do not
rule out the possibility of an inside job.
The warehouse, in an industrial park
near Heathrow, had closed-circuit
cameras, automatic closing doors and
other sophisticated equipment.

Fine line .--. D I U N
These University students look over their registration forms one last time as
they trudge up the stairs in Lorch Hall to CRISP. Early registration for
seniors started yesterday morning.

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..
.
- .. k ..

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0

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY
Office of Nuclear Energy
1984 HEALTH PHYSICS FELLOWSHIPS
Nuclear Science and Engineering and Health Physics Fellowships
Fellowships are offered by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for graduate study in health
physics. The program seeks to encourage qualified undergraduates in engineering, physical
sciences, life sciences, engineering sciences, and mathematics to pursue graduate study at partic
ipating universities in nuclear fission energy technologies related to health physics. Fellowship
stipends are S12,000 for a 12-month appointment. In addition, tuition and other required fees
are paid in full.
The program includes a practicum at a participating research center. Thepracticum is designed
to give the fellows on-site experience with DOE fission research activities. Graduate Record
Examination (GRE) general (aptitude) test scores are required for application. Applications for
fellowships beginning September 1, 1984, must be received in the Oak Ridge Associated Univer-
sities' University Programs Division office at the address below by January 30, 1984, 4:30 p.m.
Information and application forms may be requested from .

looking for the exccitement of
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oatsschool rnseardi

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