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September 09, 1983 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-09-09

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, September 9, 1983 - Page 3

"MOST STUDENTS DON'T KNOW THAT ARMY ROTC
LEADS TO AN ARMY OFFICER'S COMMISSION
AT GRADUATION"

Besides studying for his degree
in management, senior Scott Bacon is
also learning what it takes to become
an officer through Army ROTC.
"I attended an Army ROTC
Day during my freshman summer ori-
entation When I found out you
weren't obligated to anything your
freshman and sophomore years, I
decided to try it. I enjoy ROTC Im
learning things I normally wouldn't
learn in college. Like leadership
theories And tactics. The manage-
ment training you receive is really
good. too. It helped me a lot with mv
other management courses.
"m pretty involved with the
University, so I'm glad ROTC doesn't
take up a lot of time it's just a couple
of hours a week. At the end of your
junior year, you have to go to Ad-
vanced Camp. It's a lot of fun. You get
introduced to everything the Army
has to offer. Tanks, helicopters, you
name it.
In your last two years of ROTC.
you receive $100 a month. The way
I see it, ROTC is paying you money

and you just give the Army back a little
of your time When I get out of the
Army, my experience should make it
easier to get a job Corporations look
for officers, because they have expe-
rience managing people and equip-
ment. And I think starting salaries
might be higher because of that
experience."
For Scott Bacon, adding Army
ROTC to his college schedule has
really paid off Because it actually
added another dimension to his col-
lege education
And Army ROTC can do the
same for Vou
For more information stop by
the Army ROTC office on your cam-
pus today.
; And begin your future as an
officer.
Contact
MAJOR JIM DENT
764-2400/2401

:,

ARMY ROTC
A GOOD CHOICE

Daily Photo by DEBORAH LEWIS
Moment of silence
Protesters in the Diag carry signs and banners denouncing the Soviet Union Wednesday, in a rally mourning-those killed
when the Soviets shot down a Korean Airlines jet last week.
The end draws near for
Engm. humanities dept.

George Matick Chevrolet puts new
college grads in the driver's seat

By JIM SPARKS
"I guess I thought I'd be in on the
funeral," said English Prof. Emily
Cloyd as she sat down to watch the
;engineering college's Humanities
Department's last stand against
closure.
But prospects for a reprieve ap-
peared dim at Tuesday night's sparsely
attended public comments session,
where Vice President for Academic Af-
fairs and Provost Billy Frye said he will

ask the Regents next week or later in
the fall to close the department unless
new information comes up to change
his mind.
IF THE REGENTS agree, LSA would
.gradually begin teaching literature to
engineering students, although courses
in "Technology and Society" and
technical communication would remain
in the college.
Over the past few years, seven
faculty members have left the depar-
tment, but the college has not replaced

the professors, causing some class sizes
to balloon from 35 students to 80 studen-
ts.
Department chairman Dwight
Stevenson told the executive officers
that "unless our faculty losses are
replaced, I do not see how the depar-
tment can continue to function for more
than a short time."
STEVENSON, one of only six
speakers at the session, said efforts to
close the department have hurt the
See ENGIN., Page 18

NEW CHEVROLET COLLEGE GRADUATE FINANCING
PLAN OFFERS AVAILABILITY OF CREDIT, A LOW DOWN
PAYMENT AND AN ATTRACTIVE FINANCE RATE.
No one but Chevy offers financing like this on a new
Chevrolet. And at a time when you may be really
strapped for money.
If' you graduate from a four-year college or earn a
post-graduate degree between January 1983 and June
30, 1984, you may qualify for this program which of-
fers availability of credit, a low down payment and an
attractive finance rate.
All it takes is a verifiable commitment- for em-
ployment, no derogatory credit history, and monthly
payments in line with your financial capacity.
See us soon about the Chevrolet College Graduate
Financing Plan. With our help, you could get moving

Draft resister says h

By JANET RAE
and
HALLE CZECHOWSKI
A University student charged with
failing to register for the draft said last
night he wants to try to change his plea
in thecase to guilty.+
Daniel Rutt, who began taking
graduate public health classes at the
University yesterday, said he has not
discussed the change with his
American Civil Liberties Union
lawyers and is not even sure he can
legally change his plea at this late date.
But he said he has grown "comfortable
with being guilty" since he was first
charged in January.
RUTT, ONE of 15 men nationwide
being prosecuted by the federal gover-
nment for failing to register, said his
lawyers helped him to make his
original decision to plea "not guilty" by
standing mute. Several hearings later,

Rutt said he has had more time to think
about his decision not to register and
has concluded that pleading "not
guilty" may have been a mistake.
"After all, I'm guilty. That's the law.
Somebody wrote it down on a little
piece of paper and said it's against the
law not to register and I didn't,' he
said. "If that's considered a crime in
this country I'm going to plead guilty."
The 21-year-old biology graduate
from Hope College said he does not
keep in constant touch with his lawyers
and so has not had a chance to discuss
the plea change with them.
"THEY TAKE their end of the stick
and I take mine," Rutt said.
"Sometimes I don't really understand
what's going on myself."
Rutt and his lawyers are awaiting a
ruling from Federal District Court
Judge Philip Pratt which would require
the federal government to release 126
documents they say would prove Rutt is
being selectively prosecuted. the White

Le '5 guilty
House claims the documents are
protected under executive privilege. If
Pratt decides not to order release of the
documents, Rutt said the trial portion
of his prosecution could begin within a
matter of weeks.
In June, Pratt rejected a defense
request to dismiss the charges against
Rutt because the student has declared
himself to be a conscientious objector.
Pratt ruled there is no constitutional
right to such a classification.
See DRAFT, Page 6

20
Minutes
from
Campus
Via M-14

I

soon in a new Chevrolet.
Ask for Jeff Siessor or David Bec

)

Buy
George,
You
Found
It!

14001 TELEGRAPH RD. at I-96 (JEFFRIES)

531-7100

._ _._

-HAPPENINGS
Highlight
The Performance Network presents "September Dances," an evening of
works by choreographers Barbara Boothe, J. Parker Copley, Gay Delanghe,
and Kathy Morse. The show begins at 8 p.m. at 408 W. Washington.
Films
Cinema Guild - Hair, 7 & 9:15 p.m., Lorch.
Performances
Ark - Ann Doyle, 8 p.m., 1421 Hill.
School of Music - Voice recital, Nada Radakovich, 8 p.m., Recital Hall.
Meetings
University Lowbrow Astronomers - Chris Amaru, "Fall Observing," 7:30
p.m., Detroit Observatory, corner of Ann and Observatory.
Michigan Students for Hart - Mass meeting, 4 p.m., Anderson Rm.,
Union.
Korean Christian Fellowship - Bible study meeting, 9 p.m., Campus
Chapel.
Ann Arbor Chinese Bible Class -7:30 p.m., University Reformed Church.
Tae Kwon Do Club - Practice, 5-7 p.m., CCRB Martial Arts Rm.
Chinese Students Christian Fellowship - Fellowship and Bible study, 8
p.m., Memorial Christian Church, 730 Tappan.
Miscellaneous
School of Music - Workshop for piano teachers, Lynn Freeman Olson,
"True Motivation in Piano Study," 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m., Recital Hall.
Center for Afro-American and African Studies - Exhibit, "Edwin
Harlston: Painter of an Era, 1882-1931," noon-8 p.m., Rackham East
Gallery.
} Engineering - Phillip Culbertson, "The Space Station and its Im-
plications," 3:30 p.m., Chrysler Center Aud.
Duplicate Bridge Club - Open game, 7:15 p.m., League.
Panhellenic Association - Plant sale, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Pendleton Rm.,
t Union.
a To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI. 48109.
t~

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