100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 18, 1983 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-11-18
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

w w w w w w w w w

7

7

:W

-1w

-wr

-WF

-wl-

7r

-qqpv-

T

n

lll-

COVER STORY
The perfect pitch Page 1
With all the competition amongst the pre-med, pre-
law and pre-business students of LS & A it's easy to
overlook the struggles experienced elsewhere at the
University-particularly in the music school. This
week's cover story takes an in-depth look at the
problems that music students must confront daily
and how they cope with these situations to hit the per-
fect pitch. Cover photo by Brian Masck.
DISCS
Not too slick Page 3
Midnight Oil throws some political punches but
their music lacks the depth of more established
groups. Read this week's review and find out whether
or not you should give these guys and their new LP
10,9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1 a chance.

FILM
Bergman's finale Page 4-9
Ingmar Bergman claims to have made his last film
and the result is a three-hour film full of images and
illusions, Bergman-style. This week we take a look at
Bergman's Fanny & Alexander to see if it's keeping
with his style.
MUSIC
Musical mania Pages8-9
This week Ann Arbor has a lot to offer by way of
music, what with Cris Williamson at the Michigan
Friday night and the new talent in town, the Per-
suasions at the U-Club Sunday. Weekend also
previews the Lords of the New Church concert in
Detroit for those of you who are inclined to -go
elsewhere for your musical entertainment.

THE LIST
Happenings Pages 5-7
Your guide to fun times for the coming week in Ann
Arbor. Film capsules, music previews, theater notes
and bar dates-all listed in a handy-dandy, day-by-
day schedule.
THEATER
The nose knows Page 9
Everyone is familiar with the story of Cyrano de
Bergerac and how the woman he loves finds out all
too late about his affections. The Professional
Theater Program presents their adaptation of Ed-
mond Rostand's popular comedy based on the adven-
tures of the poet, philosopher, soldier Cyrano and his
nearly vain attempts to win the heart of Roxanne.

i

Practice: The same four walls

Weekend
'-ndoy, Novemnber 18, 1983
o Is o 10
Magazine Editors .....................Mare Hodges
Susan Makuch
Sales Manager .........................Meg Gibson
Assistant Sales Manager ..........Julie Schneider

Weekend is edited and managed by students on the
staff of The Michigan Daily at 420 Maynard, Ann Ar-
bor, Michigan, 48109. It appears in the Friday edition
of the Daily every week during the University year
and is available for free at many locations around the
campus and city.

Weekend, (313) 763-0379 and 763-0371; Michigan
Daily, 764-0552; Circulation, 764-0558; Display Adver-
tising, 764-0554.
Copyright 1983, The Michigan Daily.

at least, so we compete for those few
positions against each other."
The seating in the orchestras and
bands is based on talent and
achievement and determined by the
respective conductors. Sometimes the
conductors move the members from
seat to seat for different performances,
especially if they are close in ability.
But for the most part, the students
have "to earn their place. There is n^'
artificial strata," says Boylan.
He contends that the school manages
the competition with "humanity and
dignity" and that it is "not cut throat,
but honest and with integrity."

optimistically, "Many musicians will
make a job for themselves. Somehow."
The long hours a music student puts
in day after day sometimes results in
nothing but frustration. "Sometimes I
feel like throwing my french horn and
screaming," says Walters.
But these students know they must
play on. They know that out in the real
world of professional music, the only
thing that matters is how well you play.
"No one cares what your grades were
in college when you have an audition,"
says Hess. "It's your musical ex-
perience, not your degrees."
.Yet even those who are lucky enough

I

I

NOT ALL CLOUDS HAVE SILVER LININGS
OURS HAVE GOOSE FEATHERS
0
Make your mattress or waterbed feel like you're sleeping on a cloud. You
have the billowy comfort of small white goose feathers covered by 100 %
cotton. The added comfort and warmth of the featherbed is perfect for
dorms, campers, waterbeds and conventional beds. Sleep on top or under-
neath. .--I.."

py, except music."
For students entering the School of
Music, it's a continuation of a discipline
that began years ago, in elementary
school for most. These students come
to college knowing exactly what they
want to learn. They don't wait until
their junior years-or sometimes
later-to declare a major. As one
student put it, "Everyone knows why
they're here."
"It made a big difference. I came to
school knowing what I was majoring in,
knowing what I would study," says
Wyman. "That's what gives everyone
that look of intensity."
That "look of intensity" is omni-
present. It is etched on the faces of
these musicians as they walk from
class to class. Even when taking a five-
minute coffee or candy break in the
school's lounge, their conversations
center around music, drifting from past
concerts, to upcoming rehearsals, to
music theory assignments and musical
scores.,
Boylan attributes much of this to the
students' love of music which he says is
beyond the comprehension of someone
outside the school.
"They take a great work, a
Beethoven or a Mozart, and then
assimilate it to perform something
great," he explains. "The fecundity of
the art is what challenges them. That's
what the music students are attracted
to."

W' hen w
schoo
years away.
know each oti
push and sho'
congested fish
the music
through the to
and checking t
The small s
obvious simil
lends itself to
munity. Yet
dships they d
musicians witl
sleep, and play
students say tl
Campus where
"Sometimes
central campu
"I rarely see
music school.
outside the :
reason."
In an attem
the school regt
non-music
semesters..
Still, these
bombarded wi
in effect, is th
vertising frat(
student getaw
on the wall
promote upcc
members for
bargains on t
the school itsel
shaped like a
serves as a rer
But these s
admit that the
they asked fo
hasn't pulled
When they de
knew what th<
are determine
"It's drainir
says Wyman
waking hours i
"One of the
of is making
continues. "
much time h
volved. Somet
even more tim

THE CROWNING TOUCH
Solid symbol of the rugged chronometer it caps
is the patented Triplock winding crown.
Precision tooled, tough as tempered steel, it
screws down on the Oyster case like a submarine
hatch. It seals this stylish, masculine
Submariner-Date down to 1,000 feet with double
protection. The self-winding Submariner-Date
in stainless steel with matching Fliplock
bracelet is the official timepiece of
the '83 America's Cup. , *
ROLEX

'No one cares what your grades were in
college when you have an audition. It's your
musical experience, not your degrees.'
-Paul Hess
Music school graduate student

While a music student's schedule
may seem like fun and games to
non-music majors who spend endless
hours at the UGLI hoping to gain an ex-
tra edge in the job market once they
graduate, these students have no such'
illusions. They are familiar with the
realities of a career in music-that
there are many more musicians than
there are symphonies, orchestras, and
opera companies.
"The statistics are bad for music
majors," says Wyman. But, she adds

to land jobs, know there isn't any
guarantee for much financial reward.
For these students, however,
something more is at work than a stake
in their futures. When they entered
college, they made a conscious decision
to enroll in a school where the major
fields of study are performance, theory,
history, and education of music.
"I could have done anything I wanted
to when I started college," says Velich.
"I thought it over carefully, but I knew
nothing would fulfill me, make me hap-

Tensa is a

to."

TWIN
FULL
QUEEN
KING

Reg. Price
$ 95
$125
$155
$190

FEATHERBED SALE
NOW THROUGH DECEMBER 3, 1983
Limited to Stock on Hand
Briarwood Mall
994-1228
2 Weekend/Nq e rm4 93

Sale Price
$ 71
$ 94
$116
$143
india
ncomfort Yor S
EuropeanCofr You Bring Homne

We'll give you the best haircut in
your life . .. or your money back!
CHARISM *)
HAIR & SKIN CARE FOR HIM & HER
Hour,Monday ,Friday 9 7 Saturday 9
333 S. Fourth Ave. 995-0804

$4.00 OFF
ad regular $18.00haircut!
' *** HaircutI Includes-.Shampoo.
cod. tonerodho drying 3
$10.00OOFF C
X a regular $45.00 perm! W'I
I (longer hairslightly more!N
15% OFF
x ~ hair and skin products aM
Mosley Redken RK Sebostian .KMS PH Plus 5wF3
*Nexus TRI.h.nd.dryers.onsec

Conlin
Corner of
South University
and Washtenam
769-9680

Travel

,

IW

Complete
Airlines'v
Hotels,@
Tours 4
Amtr
30-5:00
ervice Charges

M-F 8:3
No S

11

11

mmm

mmm

I

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --- .. -- - - - - - -, - -- - - -

11 Weeken

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan