100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 08, 1983 - Image 79

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-09-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 1 8-E -- The Michigan Daily - t6 -rs tay, Sip '"6 $,'9

V V

T i r =s Wiby

00

$B

. . . . . . . . . ... S. . .... . ..:. .k. ..*... ....... *..
.9' .,t.: : .":.* .:yc,;..: .xs .:2:.:...<... :... . :," ... . . . . . . ..:f+ ">.:.:.,°"... :3;:::{ :...:::..:.:" : :::,::,"":tr.,, .;;...:<,;

......... .......... ................,,..,,,..:.:..::::.:......:.Y:::::::? v.: }:::.: {{::: ;::}__._"}<":; ; }}h ;:>. ":1.
.... ..... ........................ ........ ...,. _........ .......:.v........v "............:.....v.... .... ........ ........:.. .....v............n.:.. ".......... n.... .:.........::v 4 h v.r ..... ...\...:i "... }.,. Y'r:4' . '"k{3ti"}:i
...n.. .r ...... ........ v....v.v ................................nr ....:... .....v n... r ....v. ........ ............ r..4 vn..., ... n......v}r :.... v.... ..... n ................................................... ................ .... .... .. .......:..... r.v, ..............v r .. '{..n'4 ....--:.,r . ........: ... ........... {.. n'v. .. n...v..... n.}:vv v :"}Y.": {v '".v: vv::..v w:: w::........... .. n1....":Y$}.....
. ..... : ...... . ... ....... ..... : n:.v...: :4.:v:.""w;: w:::}:".}wn""v: {.4:}:: :vw.}.; ........v x;r "rr:.v: ::":
.. .:.......v h ........:............ ..... .. .. .............k v......... r..... .........v. r....... ,, vv:.': ": v:: ::"."{:fi:?{?.:" 4:4: :"}:{{}.}:"}{}}'"Y": v :":'ti-v}}}:-v ::: x.}}:{"}}}i}:
..............r ....... ...........{ .v...:.................. "..........:......... f.........v n.xv.....K .. ?v .. ........ :...... n. '":" r ......... "v{v.......- :... }. n. .... r..: }..1....n n... . .,:: r.........
.. ......... . ." .. . t ... n f... r... n... ....... .. .. ..... ..........................:. .. . . r ..:.. "..:........ w: '" : ": r:. ........ .} '.".,.ny. ...::: nv: .. r: 4i A"?:"i:{: {::......... .,
n.v:'.,: 4,., \ :..n...!:Sv$:t.v ...:........." .fn...-r.:.s.,.y,.,::.:::: nti"}}}h}.v........"Xiv' .....4xb:7f.....w: n:: ,:
:rnv,"nw:..,..:..Avh": x,.v::: .k::":::::nvv {' ^"rvni{vr:".v'{vffv::vnvRv: x::,w.w:n:v:nw:::?:-:r."a.vi.":.{i'' .'r:.:"'....'t...,r ........ :....: v}::: }}:{{{"}?.. }. n. v.. ..... : .n v..f...

Print
mint

By Tim Slavin
E VER TRIED to find the Hardy-
Boys' Detective Handbook? Having;
read all F.W. Dixon's thrilling stories
by age eight, I have spent the last fif-
teen years looking without success for
this one book in the series. Back then I
thought the book would help me grow
up to be like dark-haired Frank Hardy;
needless to say, you won't find any
mystery books written about me.
Well, I finally found the book in a clut-
tered basement bookstore on East
Liberty Street, the Dawn Treader. I
didn't have the $2.50 to buy it, but with
suggestive chapter titles like "Criminal
Slang and Legal Language," it proved
well worth finding.
Such discoveries are next to im-
possible at Ann Arbor's commercial
bookstores-Border's, Ulrich's, Logos,
Follett's and the two Community News
Centers. Nor is there the bated ex-
citement of pulling a book free from a
huge, chaotic stack, hoping that nothing

crashes down. There are no comfor-
table chairs or narrow corners to sit
and read for half an hour. Nor is there
the accidental suggestiveness of
misplaced books; I found Hemingway's
Death in the Afternoon in the "cam-
ping" section of one small bookshop.
But Ann Arbor alternatives to the
larger bookstores do exist. In fact, six
small bookshops do business in the
South State Street and East Liberty
area. Some, like Shaman Drum, New
Era, and The Eye of Agamotto, focus on
collecting specific books. Others, in-
cluding the State Street Bookshop and
the Dawn Treader, carry both used and
rare material. David's Bookstore
carries only used books and magazines.
These small bookshops have at-
mosphere. There is the cluttered look of
Dawn Treader and David's, where
books are crammed floor to ceiling and
the bookshelves appear to be trying to
escape the onrush of books, with the
books winning. Or there is the orderly,
carpeted quiet of Shaman Drum, with
its windows looking down on a crowded
and bustling State Street.
The stores' owners are generally
outgoing and well-informed. They're
willing to help you find what you're
looking for, or just to talk about books
and any other interesting subject.
Bill Gillmore, owner of Dawn
Treader, opened the store in 1978 after
his landlord said he needed a retail
outlet to accompany his book-binding
business.
Ann Arbor is a great area for used

.)
.a
tc0

David's Books: Local bookstores can provide interesting

B-eyond
calgon
By Jim Boyd
HAVE YOU GOT those freshperson
blues. You don't like your
roomate, you're worried about your
course load, and no one at the Univer-
sity loves you. Now is-when you really
want Calgon to take you
away...mother's loving arms and dad's
cooking. To sit by the hearth with your
loved ones, happy and safe, withdrawn
from life's worries, is that what you
want?
Don't fool yourself, you're in college
now and there's no looking back. Cry
for mommy all you want, but she's not
going to be there when you need her.
You've entered the real world! There is
no 'home'. The blue skies of your
youth are clouding with maturity.
But perhaps that picture is too dark.
If it really rains too much, make like
Noah and head for the next best thing to
home-the Ark.
For fifteen years the Ark has been a
home away from home for thousands of
Ann Arbor folk music lovers. If you en-
joy this type of music or something even
remotely similar to it, the Ark is Worth
a try. One can find a little storytelling, a
little bluegrass, a little country, a little
bit rock 'n roll, and especially a lot of
very nice people.
If acoustic music is your fancy, the
Ark is really the only place in Ann Ar-
bor to find it. In fact, outside of
Chicago, it could be the only place in the
Midwest where such variety and
quality of folk music can be found.

This past year the likes of Tom Pax-
ton, Jim Post, and Bryan Bowers have
made appearances at the haven on Hill
Street.
Ann Arbor audiences are quite ap-
preciative of folk musicians so the
musicians tend to enjoy playing
here-so much so that the Ark is a
choice stop for them. For instance, last
winter Tom Paxton made a tour of sor-
ts. He. played in New York,
Philadelphia, Chicago...and Ann Arbor.
The city may not have population, but
it definitely has interest.
Ark lovers this past year received a
scare when the First Presbyterian
Church, which has allowed the Ark to
use its building, threatened to tear the
building down and replace it with a
parking lot. Much to their relief,
however, the Ark has a lease for at least
one more year, and hopefully for much
longer.
The variety of entertainment to be
found at the Ark is impressive. The only
qualifications are that the music be
acoustic and that it also come on a per-
sonal level.
The setting is an intergral part of
delivering the music intimately and
comfortably. On first seeing the Ark
one is struck by the fact that, yes, it
looks just like home. There's even a
lawn and trees and stuff. Cautiously
walk up the wood steps, open the door,
and still you will swear that this could
be your front hall.
But where does the band play? If it
were your house where would you put
it? In the living room! There are
pillows on the floor for the
liberated-and of course the more con-
ventional chair.
Don't walk in expecting to get drunk
or picked up. Instead, what you can ex-
pect is to enjoy good music in an at-
mosphere that makes you really feel at
home. So remember, if the high tides
are about to wash you away, there is
high ground in Ann Arbor. Head to th
Ark, you don't even have to go in pairs. E

study breaks.
bookstores, says Gillmore. More than
90 percent of all books, outside textbooks, are
bought by about 7 percent of the
population, he says, and "we've got a
lot of seven percents right here."
Area used book stores buy and sell a
good percentage of merchandise from
and to students, with a high turnover

rate the main objective. "I try to get
books from the people who simply have
them to people who actually use them,"
says Gillmore.
The following is a listing of these
stores and their points of interest.
Because of low rents, most are located
on second floors or in basements. Fin-
ding the front door is the only difficult
task in locating most of them.
*David's Bookstore (622 E. Liberty).
Located above Discount Records. A
table of discounted books stands in-
vitingly outside the front door. Inside,
crammed from floor to ceiling, wait
selections of the odd and offbeat as well
as the usual worn Michener and John
Jakes paperbacks.
'Dawn Treader (525 E. Liberty).
Located in the basement under
Schoolkids' Records. Just inside the
street door are five shelves of 50t
paperback specials on romance and
mystery novels, great for quick reads.
The harder stuff is downstairs: more
paperbacks, one entire room of science
fiction, as well as hardbacks ranging
from old novels to analyses of
Watergate. Fine natural science selec-
tion.
'New Era Books (215 S. State). An airy
upstairs room over Jason's ice cream
shop, New Era's varnished floors, big
windows and the few straight
bookshelves definitely don't feel com-
fortable.
'Shaman Drum (313 S. State). Find the
stainless steel and glass door between
Wild's and the Continental Deli.
'State Street Bookshop (316 S. State).
The most commercial of all these small
bookshops, they sell mostly rare books
and magazines. The high ceiling and
worn hardwood floor makes it a com-
fortable place to browse and read. Even
if you don't have money, it is nice to
look at the books and magazines in their
glass cases. In the back are the usual
fiction paperbacks, very few of them
rare.
'The Eye of Agamotto (340 S. State).
Looking for the first issue of Mad
magazine? How about a copy of the
third issue of New Fun, printed in 1935?
Or a graphic spin-off of the old TV
series, The Flying Nun?W
- Daily arts writer Ben Ticho filed
a report for this story

house.

EVERYTHING IN THE LIVELY ARTS
APublicaionofT ichigan Dail

for all your music

rock " dance "'jazz ' folk " blues " reggae " gospel " vintage R&B and motown ' salsa
popular vocals " cutouts " imports ' soundtracks/original cast " bluegrass ' country
international " "new music" " Japanese pressings " direct discs' original masters
digital " EP's and singles " record care accessories " Maxell and TDK blank tapes
music'magazines
best selectionof popular records & cassettes at the best prices

annor
CivicBallet
AUDITIONS
FOR QUALIFIED DANCERS
SEPTEMBER 14th " 7 p.m.
at
SYLVIA STUDIO
525 E. Liberty o 668-8083

~d~ape5

523 E. Liberty
(Rare & Used Records-514 E. William)
open every day

_. _.. _ J

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan