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November 08, 1983 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-11-08

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Page 8 - The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, November 8, 1983

Blue Lines

r

East-West college hockey .. .
...World Series on ice

By MIKE MCGRAW
VER NOTICE that college hockey
is a lot like major league baseball? You
probably haven't, but it is.
In baseball, you have the National and American
Leagues, where the teams in each league play each
other only in the post-season. Also, the Nationals
have dominated the Americans during the last 10
years or so. Plus the AL has the designated hitter.
There isn't a DH in hockey, but in the other aspects
the two sports are very similar. For example, in
college hockey there are two distincet and
seperate groups of teams: those in the East and
their counterparts in the West.
The eastern contingent is made up of 17 schools
that form the three divisions of the East Coast
Athletic Conference. While in the West there is the
six-team Western Collegiate Athletic Association
and the 11-school Central Collegiate Hockey
Association giving that area 17 teams as well.
These conferences play their own schedules and
playoffs and when all that is over the top four teams

in the east play the top four in the west in the first
round of the NCAA tournament. If this isn't similar
enough to baseball, the western teams have won the
NCAA championship 10 out of the last 11 years.
Sound familiar?
Last weekend at Yost Arena the regions collided
when Michigan took on the University of New Ham-
pshire in the type of series that, in baseball, is sup-
posed to be played in Florida or Arizona before the
season starts. Actually, those were the first games
for the Wildcats from Durham, N.H. but the Wolverines
were just filling the space on their schedule that was
occupied by Notre Dame before the Irish dropped their
hockey program at the end of last season.
New Hampshire's Charlie Holt has been coaching at
that eastern school for 15 years and has seen a lot of
teams on both sides of the Appalachian Mountains
but doesn't see any differences in play between the
two areas as a whole - such as the stereotype that
western schools are physical while east teams have
more finesse players.
"There are no differences, except between

teams," Holt said. "Michigan plays the body a lot
more than MSU or Bowling Green. Also Wisconsin
has always been good, but they're not very
phvsical."
But you can't really deny the fact that the West has
been more successful than the East as far as cham-
pionships go. The West does, however, have an ad-
vantage in the fact that six of the ECAC schools are
Ivy League and don't give scholarships. Plus they
get a lot more Canadian players.
"Iathink winning the championship is just a case of
having the right combination," said Holt. "The
scholarship schools have a better opportunity to get
the best players. Also Ontario is very accessible for
the CCHA, but we can't really draw from Quebec
because of the language barrier."~
But the East will have a chance to redeem itself
next March at Lake Placid in the Late-Winter
Classic (a.k.a. the NCAA Championship). After all,
the American League did win the World Series this
year. Now if they only played a hockey all-star
game in the middle of the season...
gaei em

INTERNATIONAL
CAREER?
A representative
will be on the campus
TUESDAY,
NOVEMBER 15, 1983
to discuss qualifications for
advanced study at
AMERICAN
GRADUATE SCHOOL
and lob opportunities
in the field of
INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT
Interviews may be scheduled at
CAREER PLANNING and
PLACEMENT/3200 Student
Activities Building
AMERICAN GRADUATE SCHOOL
OF INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT
Thunderbird Campus
Glendale, Arizona 85306

Ski club, no last resort

By SCOTT DIMETROSKY
Although it is only November,
Michigan skiers are already- planning
for the upcoming ski season. Last
night, at the Union, the Michigan Ski
Club held its first meeting.
The club is actually a combination of
two smaller ski clubs. Last year, Scott
Hovarter, a transfer student from
School Craft Community College, star-
ted Michigan's first official ski club.
Jim McCullough, meanwhile, had been
busy planning ski trips and running an
informal club. The two combined their
memberships into one all-inclusive ski
club.
The turn-out for their ski club was
tremendous, with over 200 members
joining in its first year. The club's
largest outing of the year, a week long
trip to Jackson Hole, Wyoming, had 90
people go along. Hovarter hopes to
even have more members this year.
The ski club plans to expand its ac-
tivities this year to include more than
just ski trips. For one thing, the club
hopes to sponsor workshops on how to
buy skis, how to care for skis and
possibly even provide ski lessons. The

workshops and lessons will be handled
by McCullough, who served as captain
of the ski team the past two years but is
ineligible to race this year.
"Not many skiers know much about
the sport," McCullough said, "and I
feel I have lots of resources to give and
I like teaching."

year's trip to Jackson Hole included
beer on the bus ride, wine and cheese
parties on the slopes and a great time
for all. A trip to Boyne Mountain was
sponsored by the National Collegiate
Ski Association(NCSA), who rented out
the entire mountain to a host of college
ski clubs. According to Hovarter, there
was a "party atmosphere" the whole
weekend of the trip.
This year the ski club is planning a
number of trips. On the weekend of
December 16 there will be a trip to
Boyne Mountain, while over Christmas
there will be a trip to Steamboat,
Colorado. Over spring break the club
will be going either to Colorado or Utah.
Membership in the Michigan Ski Club
is six dollars, andthat includes mem-
bership to the NCSA which provides
discounts at major ski resorts across
the country. Those interested in joining
the club, or signing up for one of the
trips, should call McCullough at 665-
0018. It might only be November, but
skiers are thinking snow.

Michigan freshman Brad Jones (left) in
Hampshire's Paul Barton during last w
the battle, the Wolverines won the war, s

CCHA Sci

The ski club also hopes to have bi-
monthly get-togethers for its members.
If it can, the club will also sponsor ski
films.
"We hope to promote skiing as much
as possible," Hovarter said.
And, of course, the ski club will also
sponser ski trips, clearly the most out-
standing of the club's activities. Last

CCHA STANDINGS

Overall
1) Ohio State (8-0).......
2) Bowling Green (7-1).
3) Michigan State )6-2) ...
4) Lake Superior (5-4) ....
5) Northern Mich. (3-5)...
6) MICHIGAN.(5-4) ......
7) Ferris State (6-3) ......
8) Michigan Tech (5-2-1)..
9) Illinois-Chicago (2-6) ...
10) Western Mich. (3-5) ...
11) Miami (1-7)..........

W
6
5
4
3
3
2
2
2
2
1
0

L
0
1
2
3
3
2
2
2
4
5
6

Pct
1.000
833
.667
.500
.500
.500
.500
.500
.333
.167
.000

0
4
f
c
r
i

A project of LSA Student Government
Free University Lectures on Social Change
TODAY
Residential College Professor Ann Lorimore on
Thinking About Decentralization"
Tuesday, November 8th - 4 p.m.
CANTERBURY LOFT
332 S. STATE, SECOND FLOOR
Next Week: November 15th, Mark Chesler on
"The University"

Daily Photo by JEFF SCHRIER
ixes it up with the University of New
eekend's action. Even if Barton won
weeping the series, 3-2 and 5-4.
crecard
WMPL Hocker Poll
PTS
1) Ohio State (2) ........ .87.
2) Minnesota (4) .. ...8
3) North Dakota (2). .82
4) Bowling Green (2)....82
5) Providence......41
6) Michigan State.....40
7) Boston University....35
8) RPI..........15
9) Michigan Teh.....19
Tie Wisconsin......19
CCHA scores
Michigan 3-5, New Hampshire 2(0T) -4
Bowling Green 7-5, Michigan state 4-3
Ohio State 6-3, Ferris State 3-1
Northern Michigan 6-9, Miamhi 5 2-
llini.hicago 4-3, Lake Superior 3(OT)-.10
rr iers po
i e
related to our young runners' fear of
running in their first Big Ten Meet."
Goodridge was particularly disap-
pointed with the fact that the team did
not beat Illinois (sixth place), Indiana
(seventh place) and Ohio State (eighth
place).
"If we had beaten Illinois, Indiana

and Ohio State and taken sixth, I would
have been satisfied," said Goodridge.
"I think we should have beaten those
three."
The harriers now have four days left
to practice for this Saturday's district
meet in East Lansing. Goodridge hopes
her team can rebound strongly and
finish ahead of Indiana, Illinois and
Ohio State at the meet.
IM Scores
Independent
The Crib 20, Bullwangers 16
The Plow 16, v-i Stoners 6
MMB 20, Lenny Bruisers 0
BAMF 22, Mc's 6
Arbory Pirates 14, Mehoffs 8
Lakers 26, AT&T 0
Desperados over Rambling Ricks (first downs)
Foreskins 12, Non Daily Creamers 6
Bruisers 18, Reach the Beach 0
Dalai Lamar 6. Joe Bell's Unlimited 0
Myrons 14, Cruisers 6
Residence Hall
Elliot Airborne over Rotuing Rodents (first down)
Julius and the Caesars 8, 4th Hamilton 6
Bursley Elitest 40, Rumsey Gold 'A' 0
A.L. Argonarts 24, E.Q. Radicals 0
Fraternity
A
Phi Delta Theta 14, Sigma Alpha Epsilon 0
Alpha Tau Omega 6, Psi Upsilon 0
Evans Scholars 26, Phi Gamma Delta 0
Chi Psi 8, Sigma Chi 6'
Triangle 12, Zeta Psi 6
Kappa Alpha Psi 18, Delta Chi 0
Kappa Sigma 6, Alpha Epsilon Pi 0
Theta Chi 42, Phi Kappa Tau 0
B
Theta Delta Chi 8, Evans Scholars 0
Phi Gamma Delta 14, Zeta Psi 0
A lp h a S ig m a P h i 1 4, C h i P si 6 N
USED U.S. MILITARY

Runners eye regionals

By SCOTT SALOWICH
After finishing second to Wisconsin in
Saturday's Big Ten Championships, the
Michigan men's cross country team is
preparing for the NCAA District
Championships this Saturday at East
Lansing.
There will be 27 teams competing at
Michigan State. with the top four
finishers earning spots in the National
Championships the following weekend
at Lehigh University. Saturday's field
will be made up of all the Big Ten teams
plus 17 major independent schools from
the Wolverine's district.
WOLVERINE COACH Ron Warhurst
hopes his team's familiarity with the
MSU course will give them an advan-
tage over opponents like Illinois and
Purdue, who have not run on it as often.
"Michigan belongs to the strongest
conference and most competitive
district in the country," said Warhurst,

who predicted his squad could finish
second in the meet.
Warhurst, however, is not optimistic
about beating out Wisconsin. "They
are the best in the country and they ran
great last week," he said. The Badgers
are the defending Big Ten and NCAA
Champions and they returned their en-
tire team from last year.
ALTHOUGH WARHURST expressed
some disappointment with the 12th
place finish of Brian Diemer in last
Saturday's meet, he noted that, "Even
if Diemer had come in third, we still
wouldn't have won. Hopefully he will
move up in this week's event."
The Wolverine coach was pleased
with the performance of Dave Meyer,
who topped his team with a time of
24:05, good for 11th in the meet. "He
finished first at Lehigh (on October 8)
and has run two great races this
season," said Warhurst.

--- --- --- ------- --

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CANTERBURY LOFT
MEDITATION AT NOON
People of any spiritual path, or none, are welcome at a ten
minute time of silence for meditation-at Canterbury Loft on
class days.
This is an opportunity to dedicate the studying, teaching,
working, we do each day to the service of humanity. We will
gather just before noon and share a silent meditation-from
12:05 to 12:15 p.m. Monday through Friday.
The Loft is located on the second floor at 332 S. State Street,
two doors south of Nickel's Arcade. You are welcome to join us,
beginning Wednesday, November 9th, on any class day at noon.

This Week's Games
Michigan at Michigan Tech
Illinois-Chicago at Bowling Green
Miami(S) vs. Ohio State(F)
Northern Michigan at Michigan State
Lake Superior at Ferris State
New Hampshire at Western Michigan*
*Non-Conference
Women ha
to ninth in
By MIKE REDSTONE
Women's cross country coach Francie
Goodridge anticipated a tough fight to
finish for the top five spots at the Big
Ten championship meet in Champaign
last Saturday.
She did not, however, anticipate
finishing ninth out of the ten team field.
"I'M TERRIBLY disappointed and
not satisfied with the team's perfor-
mance," said Goodridge, whose team
finished third in the Big Ten and eighth
in the nation last year.
Goodridge attributes the poor
showing to a combination of inex-
perience as well as to injuries to the
team's only experienced runner, Sue
Schroeder and Judy Yuhn.
Yuhn sat out the meet because of an
injury and Schroeder was coming off a
foot injury which had forced her to miss
several weeks at practice before Satur-
day's meet.
CathytSchmidt, who came to
Michigan this year as a transfer
student, was the first Wolverine to
break the tape, finishing 25th overall in
the 70 runner field.
SCHROEDER and Kelli Bert finished
second and third for the Wolverines and
finished in 45th and 46th place respec-
tively.
Michigan, which finished over 150
points behind Wisconsin's winning total
of 52 points, was also hurt by a tactical
mistake according to Goodridge.
"Sue (Schroeder) and Cathy (Sch-
midt) started pushing too early in the
race and lost it at the end," said
Goodridge. "Sue ran herself out
because she is not up to full strength yet
because of her injury."
GOODRIDGE was disappointed with
her younger runners' times, despite
their inexperience.
"We were by far the youngest team
out there and it showed," said
Goodridge. "The poor times were

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