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September 08, 1983 - Image 74

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-09-08

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Page 2-E - The Michigan Daily - Thursday, September 8, 1983

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JAZZ

Jazz Junkies

Page 3

Jazz bands come and jazz bands go - more often
in Ann Arbor than in most cities, thanks to Eclipse
Jazz.
ROCK
Big Shews Page4
University students have seen them all, Peter
Gabriel, Joe Jackson, Phil Collins, and Bruce
Springsteen - even the Oak Ridge Boys. Will it con-
tinue?
ACOUSTIC

DISCS
A Tour Page 9
Dare to take this courageous tour through the
wonderland of new and used records buried behind
Ann Arbor store fronts. More or less off the wall
writer Larry Dean is your guide.
FILMS_
Movie mania Page 10
Will Return of the Jedi still be playing at this
magazine's publication date? Will it still be running
in the year 2000? If the campus film scene stays the
same the .answer to both is yes. The point: both new
and old films are abundant in Ann Arbor.
EATS AND DRINKS_

BOOKS
Bookworms

Although nobody really believes it during a term,
books can be fun, and in Ann Arbor so can the stores
that sell them.

COMEDY
Humorous

Page 18

Page 19

Student groups and comedy acts bring a laugh a
minute, even after the first chem 125 midterm.

EXHIBITS
Artistic

Page 20

Coping with college

Page 7

There's no place like home, there's no place like
home, there's no place like home. Or is there?
BANDS

Even if students don't have the money to spend on
fine art, a tour through a local gallery can be just
the thing on a Sunday afternoon.
xirF.

Sustainance

Page 12

Hardcore

Food and drink, the two life sustaining substance
- one could live a long life in Ann Arbor.

Arcades

Page 22

Page 6

Video games have swept over the country and the
wave surely didn't miss Ann Arbor.

A young and energetic new set of bands is sur-
facing in Ann Arbor to break some of the stagnation
in the city's music scene.
CLASSICAL
Orchestrations Page 8
Ever skipped a class to see the symphony, this fall
is your big chance with performances by the
Philadelphia Orchestra, and Yo-Yo Ma.

THEATER
Dramatics

Page 17

RADIO
Terrific Tunes

Page 23

Were you the star of your high school play? Or did
you just like to go and watch? Either way, there is
no reason to leave the memories behind. Oppor-
tunities in class productions aobund.

Free
sounds*
By Bill Spindle
R EMEMBER WAKING up in the
morning to the wonderful voices
of Captain Kangaroo and Mr. Green
Jeans. It still happens occasionally to
listeners of student radio station WC-
BN. Of course, those same listeners are
also occasionally awakened by Bow
Wow Wow, Billie Holiday, Black Uhuru,
and Beethoven.
Radio free Ann Arbor - CBN
epitomizes it. Free, free, free-all the
way to the outer limits.
"The format is really no format at
all," says Alan Winokur, a former chief
announcer for the station. "Our objec-
tive is not to play what's new, it's to
play what other stations don't play."
Playing music from all points of the
spectrum, CBN deejays seem to have
no fear. With its University funds and
several high-profit telethons, WCBN is
one of very few free-form stations to
survive the wave of commercialism
that has swept over local airwaves.
"Since we are not commercial, we
don't have to cater to' other people's
tastes," says Winokur. "It allows a
freedom that doesn't exist at other
stations. We experiment, and
sometimes experiments don't work, but
the free form suits us. There's very few
free-form sations," he says.
CBN's programming includes a
heavy dose of both new and old jazz,
blues, reggae, rockabilly, classical,
new wave, punk, ska, and any genres
that fall between the cracks. Several of
those styles are featured in hour-long
shows that run on Saturdays.
Deliberately esoteric, the station's
progamming has attracted a small but
loyal campus following, and a healthy
amount of criticism from students who
feel the music is inaccessable.
To supplement music, CBN also runs

weekly news and feature talk shows.
The programs, which usually run bet-
ween a half hour and an hour, cover
issues like gay and lesbian rights, legal
advice, nutrition, financial aid, and
campus news.
Running 24 hours a day, seven days a
week, the station has about 60 deejay
shifts. By splitting shifts, more than 100
people can get on the air per week, says
Winokur. In addition, the station em-
ploys many students to work behind the
scenes as reporters, public affairs
promoters, engineers, and writers.
Just down the hall from the CBN
studio in the Student Activities
Building is its sister station, WJJX, 650
on your AM dial.
JJX runs a much stricter, top-40 for-
mat than CBN, but focuses more on
training students for broadcast
careers, says program director Dave
Mann.
"(The two stations) are set up for
very different purposes," says Mann.
"We both try to provide good music, but
CBN is set up as alternative radio.
WJJX is set up more specifically to
train people for radio careers, simply
because there are more top-40 statons
around."
JJX's tight play list, sometimes dic-
tating seven out of eight songs played,
allows the station to train many people
who don't know a lot about music, but
still want to be on the air, says Mann.
"That's what we are here for, to give
people training. All they have to be is
willing to work and responsible," says
Mann.
WJJX's signal is not sent over the
public airwaves, but can be picked up in
most of the Univesity dorms. The signal
is broadcast through the electrical
wiring in the hill area and is sent by
telephone lines out to Bursley.
The third campus radio station,
WUOM, is professionally staffed and
plays primarily classical music, with a
smattering of jazz on Saturdays.
With its elaborate studio facilities
(when compared to other student
stations), WUOM puts out the strongest
and cleanest signal of the three
stations.
The station is not as open to students
like JJX and CBN, but it does offer
some professional intern programs for
credit.0

OW

Top 40, the classics, jazz or all three tossed into
the same pot - that's what campus radio offers the
adventurous listener.0

""

A

Weekend This is a special edition of the Weekend Magazine Daily at 420 Maynard, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109.
vol 1 Issue 1 to introduce newcomers to the arts and entertain- It appears in the Friday edition of the Daily every
ment available on campus. Weekend is edited and week during the University year and is available for
Magazine editor ........................................Bill Spindle managed by students on the staff of The Michigan free at many locations around the campus and city.

" I J

THEMICHIGAN LEAGUE
IN THE HEART OF THE CAMPUS
(across from Hill Auditorium, Burton Tower & ML B)
When you're newly arrived in A.A.,
Graduation's a long way away-
But that jubilant June
Will be here much too soon
Once you're used to the League every day.
M.B.
Send your League limerick to:
Manager, Michigan League
911 N. University
You will receive 2 free dinner tickets if your
limerick is published.
The Little League Coffee Shop
Lower level-open
Mon-Fri 7:15-4:00
Sat 7:15-11:00am
Cafeteri a--open
Mon-Sat 11 :3am-l l5pm
5:00pm-7:15pm
Sun 1l:30am-2:1Spm

f "'
-II
T HE MICH IGA N L EAGU E
Staff extends a warm welcome
to new-students
Your place to:
Meet friends for breakfast, lunch or a
snack in The Little League
Relax in our garden
Treat yourself to our delicious student
special dinner in the cafeteria
Study in the Library and 3Rd floor
Pick up the latest paperbacks, magazines,
souvenirs and supplies at the newstand

IK
Low..

-

I

4r J

I -. .

booooo00*
'*********~fftStO ~ Ry3

HAPPY HOUR
-2 FOR 1-
Monday-Saturday 4-7 p.m.

" Special Vegetarian Entrees
" Unusual Sandwiches
" Stuffed Baked Potatoes
" Fresh Ground Coffee
" Fresh Squeezed O.J.

THE CONEYA1OKt
M..
eray cross
Michig

516 E. m
MS45

from
gon Theatre

WOOF

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