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November 06, 1983 - Image 8

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-11-06

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Page 8 - The Michigan Daily - Sunday, November 6, 1983
Smith does it all in 2-10 Blue triumph

(Continued from Page 1)
rolled left and spotted Bean standing all alone in the left cor-
ner of the end zone and hit him for a four yard score.
That pass also gave Smith the Michigan record for most TD
passes in one game.
SMITH'S OTHER scoring throws came in the second quar-
ter. Leading 14-0 after the first 15 minutes, the Wolverines
took control of the ball after a Purdue punt with just 10
seconds gone in the period. Michigan promptly went 60 yards
in just 62 seconds, the score coming on a 41 yard touchdown
pass from Smith to Triando Markray, who was wide open on
the left side at the Purdue five.
Smith said he thought the Purdue defenders misread the
play, allowing Markray to get wide open near the Boiler-
maker goal.
"I think they read option first and came up, then read pass
and went to the side I was on," the Michigan quarterback
said. "My biggest concern was throwing it over
(Markray's)_head. I just sort of threw it up in the air."
WITH JUST a little over a minute left in the first half Smith
threw an 18-yard scoring pass to tight end Sim Nelson. That
came just after Smith's 30 yard scoring strike to Bean, and
was set up when Michigan's Tim Anderson intercepted a,
Scott Campbell pass on the first play after the Wolverine'
kickoff.
Smith also accounted for Michigan's first touchdown when

he scored on a 29 yard option play on the Wolverine's first
drive of the game.
The only score that Smith did not have a hand in was when
Jeff Cohen blocked a Boilermaker punt. The ball rolled into
the end zone where Carlton Rose grabbed it for six points just
before it went out of the end zone. That gave Michigan a 14-0
lead with over eight minutes left in the first quarter.
PURDUE COULD muster only a 31 yard field goal against
the Michigan defense until late in the game. Boilermaker
quarterback Scott Campbell didn't play well at all and was
under heavy pressure from the Michigan rush.
"Campbell did not throw very well," Purdue coach Leon
Burtnett said. "He was bad right from the beginning. Part of
that was (Michigan's) defense. They blitzed more than I
thought they would."
Schembechler said he had seen Campbell "play a lot bet-
ter" than he did yesterday.
"WE GOT some pressure on Campbell," he said, "but I
don't think that was his best game."
The Purdue quarterback completed just 14 of 29 passes for
118 yards and was intercepted three times before leaving the
game inthe fourth quarter for back-up Jim Everett.
Everett engineered Purdue's only touchdown drive when
the Boilermakers made a "surge" late in the fourth quarter.
On fourth and nine with under a minute remaining in the
game, he hit flanker Jeff Price for a 50 yard touchdown pass,
to make the final score 42-10.

I

Daily Photo by SCOTT ZOLTON
Jeff Cohen blocks Matt Kinzer's first quarter punt in Michigan's 42-10 victory over Purdue yesterday. Carlton Rose
recovered the ball in the end zone for a touchdown.

Four if by air

SCORING
Purdue......................0 3 0
MICHIGAN .....................14 21 7

7-10
0-42

RUSHING
MICHIGAN

SCORING PLAYS
MICH-S. Smith 29 yd run (Bergeron kick)
*ICH-Rose recovered blocked punt in end zone
(Bergeron kick)
MICH-Markray 41 yard pass from S. Smith
(Bergeron kick)
PURDUE-T. Clark 31 yard field goal
MICH-Bean 31 yard pass from S. Smith (Ber-
geron kick)
MICH-Nelson 18 yard pass from S. Smith (Bergeron
kick)
MICH-Bean 4 yard pass from S. Smith (Bergeron
kick)
PURDUE-Price 50 yard pass from Everett (Clark
kick)

S. Smith ...........
Rogers.........
K. Smith .........
White...........
Armstrong ........
Garrett............
Harbaugh .........
Hail ...............
Gray............
Carter .............
Jordan..........
Hawthorne :.
King............
Feulner ...........
Campbell ..........
Everett ...........
P
M
S. Smith..........
Hall .................
Harbaugh ...........

Att.
12
17
8
7
2
3
1
1

Yds.
126
62
40
21
9
7
-13
-17

Avg.
10.5
3.6
5.0
3.0
4.5
2.3
-13.0
-17.0
4.4
4.0
3.0
3.8
7.0
2.5
-3.0
-11.0

PURDUE

14
5
6
4

61
20
18
15

TD
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
TD
4
0
0

PURDUE
Campbell........... 29 14
Everett ............. 5 2
RECEIVING
MICHIGAN
No.
Bean ...................... 7
Nelson .................... 2
Markray .................. 1
Rogers .................... 1
White.................... 1
Garrett...................1
PURDUE

3
0

118
60

Yds.
96
28
41
8
7
3
97
19
15
15
7
9
8
8

0
1
TD
2
1
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

' M'getting bowled over by choices
By RON POLLACK Alex Crutchfield, who is on the Fiesta Bowl Board
The Rose Bowl may be out of the question, but the Michigan tors, said that there is a good chance that the win
football team looks like it will still be able to soak up some Michigan-Ohio State game later this season will
sun in a prestigious bowl game. bowl.
"I heard we may go the Orange, Cotton, Aloha or Fiesta "THE POSSIBILITY of Michigan or Ohio Statei
Bowl," Wolverine offensive guard Stefan Humphries said, our list," Crutchfield said. "That would be very cloy
"I've just heard those four. I hear that from the papers and our first or second choice."
around the football building from players and coadhes." Other teams being considered for the Fiesta]
A FIFTH possibility is the Sugar Bowl. Present at'yester- Notre Dame, Pittsburgh, Alabama, Georgia, North
day's Michigan-Purdue game was Sugar Bowl Executive and Boston College.
Director Mickey Holmes. Holmes said that when he goes to In a phone interview earlier this week, 'Al
see a team play late in the season, it means that squad is Executive Director Mackay Yanagisawa said ghat
being given major consideration for the New Orleans-based would probably have to lose another game if it is to
bowl. post-season in Hawaii.
"It's too bad they aren't going to Pasadena, but from a With Michigan scheduled to play Minnesota next
selfish standpoint we've got to be happy Michigan is Ohio State matched up against Northwestern, sou
available," Holmes said. "We've got to be happy, you can't the Wolverines football program said a deal could b
get a better name." week to decide where the two teams play.
Other teams under consideration to play the Southeast Conf- According to offensive guard Jerry Diorio, the W
ference champion in this bowl are Ohio State, Notre Dame, players and coaches will talk about the bowl situ
Pittsburgh, North Carolina, SMU, Nebraska and Oklahoma. meeting today.

d of Direc
ner of the
play in hi
is high on
se to being
Bowl are
h Carolina
oha Bowl
Michigan
o spend it4
Week and
rces from
be cut this
Nolverines
ation at a

1 7

First Downs .......
Rushing (Att/yds.)
Passing Net Yards.
Passing (Att/
Comp/Int) ......
Total Yards .
Fumbles (No./Lost)
Punts (No./Avg.) ..

MICH
22
51/235
183
16/13/0
418
2/1
4/34.0

PURDUE
17
34/111
178
34/16/3
289
2/1
4/19.5

4
3
1

10
-9
-11

PASSING
ICHIGAN
Att. Comp.
13 1
1 1
2 1

Price.................
Benson ...................
Brunner ................
Jackson ................
Jordan ...................
Carter......... .......
Hawthorne................
Retherford..............

f
S
1

6
2
2
2
1
1

Int
0
0
0

Yds
159
17
7

Bo would like to waive
some offans' enthusiasm
MICHIGAN TAILBACK Rick Rogers takes the hand-off, evades a
defensive lineman, two shelves of books, and the card catalog
to burst into the Graduate Library Reference Room for the touch-
down.
The fans gathered at the tables quietly look up from their books, nod
their approval and return to studying.
But even playing in a library would not satisfy Michigan coach Bo
Schembechler's desire for silence. After all, the rapid movement of
pages - chapter after chapter - bears a striking resemblance to
waves of cheering Michigan Stadium fans.
Call it spontaneous eruption, but 104,946 Michigan fans became 4a
perpetual-motion machine yesterday. While the Wolverines rocked
Purdue 42-10, the cheering sections were strictly New Wave.
The fans spent much of the afternoon playing their newest game,
the Wave cheer, in which each section of onlookers stands to cheer in
succession, encircling the entire stadium. Schembechler, however,
toyed only with ideas on how to stem the new tide of fan enthusiasm.
"That thing (the Wave) should never have started," Schembechler
said. "If it never started, nobody would know that we have an oval
stadium and that you can make an ass of yourself all the way around
the oval.
"I can't believe that fans are not sophisticated enough to understand
the game," he added. "It's unsportsmanlike to both teams."
But what the fans lacked in football sophistication they made up for
with cheering innovations.

Keeping Score
By CHUCK JAFFE

Inconsistent 'M' offense
surges back to top form

I

When the stadium announcer asked for quiet, the fans responded
with a silent wave. An important play spawned a key wave. The third
quarter produced a tidal wave, which circled the stands six times
before dying out. Other variations included double waves, counter-
clockwise waves (as opposed to the standard, right-to-left movement)
and even a call-for-quiet (Sssshh!) wave.
It was a classic case of unbridled enthusiasm at its best and most
harmless; wave after wave of proof as to why college football is an
emotional fun-filled afternoon.
The Wave actually started in Washington, where fans did the cheer
during time-outs and halftime. A few weeks later, during the Iowa
game, the Wave rolled into Michigan Stadium with the timing of a
hurricane.
As fans rejoiced in the first complete oval, Michigan suffered a
delay-of-game penalty, and Schembechler discovered what he might
now call "the home field disadvantage."
"We're going to waive the Wave," Schembechler said at his weekly
media luncheon following the Iowa game. "There'll be no more waves
when either team has the ball, or we'll empty the stadium and play
without (fans). Or we'll find anew head of the cheerleaders or the
band or whoever-the-hell thought that up."
But the cheerleaders and band had nothing to do with yesterday's
waves. While row after row got up to cheer, the cheerleaders and band
tried to promote quiet - an effort, perhaps, to restore order and retain
jobs.
"(The fans) got a little carried away with it today," said band direc-
tor Eric Becher, who played "Let's Go Blue" in an attempt to re-direct
first-half fan energy. "If we could have organized it during a time-out
it would have been fine. It's a really neat cheer, but it got a little out-of-
control today."
"We had nothing to do with it today," added head cheerleader Bob
Seymour. "We never do any cheer during the game or injury time-
outs. I would hope that the fans would show the same respect, but
there is no way to stop the Wave. It just dies out when it dies out.
"With all the talk and media hype, it's almost as if (Schembechler)
dared'the fans to do it again," Seymour added.
"When all these people set their minds to something, it's real hard to
control it," said Purdue cheerleading captain Belinda Cook. "I think
the cheer just shows a lot of enthusiasm - maybe too much if it inter-
feres with the game - and everybody seems to have fun with it."
But since no penalties were assessed against the Wave yesterday,
the cheer only added to the game, which even Schembechler would
admit was conceived to be played and watched for fun.
Besides, any college student will tell you that it is no fun to be in the
library on a Saturday afternoon.

By LARRY MISHKIN
"Our name is the Michigan offense. After
averaging 375 yards a game all season we can
manage only 258 yaTrs against Illinois."
"Our name is the Michigan offense. After
scoring only one touchdown in our last two
games and looking especially ineffective against
Illinois we can roll up 418 yards and 42 points
against Purdue with no trouble at all."
Will the real Michigan offense please stand up.
IN YESTERDAY'S 42-10 thrashing of the
Boilermakers, the Wolverine offense looked like
it had been reborn, or at least woken up,
following its dismal showing down in Champaign
a week ago.
This new offensive enthusiasm ;was apparent
from the very first Michigan play of the game.
No off-tackle run by Rick Rogers or dive up the
middle, by Eddie Garret this time. Steve Smith
shocked everyone in the stadium by throwing a
pass. It didn't matter that the play was brought
back 15 yards for clipping, the tempo of the game
had been set.
Seven plays later, the Wolverines had covered
57 yards on eight plays and were ahead 7-0 with
the score coming on a 29-yard Smith run that was
reminiscent of the Steve Smith of old. Juke to the
left, juke to the right, spin and walk on in for the
score.
LAST WEEK on Michigan's first possession,
the offense moved 48 yards on 16 plays and had to
settle for a Bob Bergeron field goal.
On the Wolverine's second possession, they
were stopped on the Purdue 48 and forced to
punt. But this was a newly revitalized Michigan
squad that was not about to let a little adversity
stop it. So, upon getting the ball back a minute
later, Smith led his troops 60 yards on only three
plays with 41 of those yards coming on a touch-
down pass to a wide-open Triando Markray.
Possessions three and four for Michigan were
deceiving as the Wolverines were stopped both
times. On the first of the two drives, the Purdue
defense even looked impressive, holding
Michigan on a fourth and one.
ONCE AGAIN, though, the offensive unit boun-
ced back by ripping off consecutive scoring
drives of 41 and 53 yards on two and three plays
respectively.
It was right after Sim Nelson scored on a Smith
pass to cap off the 53 yard drive and give

Michigan a 35-3 halftime lead one could feel con-
fident that this was a different offense than had
been shown to Wolverine fans yet this year.
The first half of yesterday's game was
Michigan's finest of the season and showcased
the Wolverines offense at its best. Unfortunately
it came a week late, although it was the Illinois
loss that slapped the offense in the face and
finally got it moving again.
"THE ILLINOIS loss hurt because we didn't
play well," said a much happier Bo Schem-
bechler after yesterday's game. "We were down
mentally after (the Illinois loss) and it was a
tough week, but the players responded well in
practice and played well today."
The offensive performance was especially
heartening for Smith who finally silenced his
critics by hitting on 11 of 13 passes for 159 yards
and throwing a Michigan record four touch-
downs.
"It's nice to know we could come out and move
the ball," said Smith, who was given a rest for
the last quarter and a half in favor of Dave Hail
and Jim Harbaugh. "This takes care of the
speculations like 'can we throw?'
"I DIDN'T REALLY throw the ball that
much," Smith continued, "and got lucky that I
threw as many touchdown passes as I did. I
threw for as many touchdowns today as I have
all season. It makes you think why the passingf
game wasn't going all year."
One reason that the passing game had not been
going all year is that Smith's sore right shoulder
had been bothering him in varying degrees
before yesterday's game. As a result, yesterday
was the first game Smith played all year without
his special shoulder brace. And his: performance
was testimony to his new freedom of movement.
"We felt like we needed to put points on the
board," said Smith, who also rushed for 126 yar-
ds to give him 285 total offensive yards on the day
as he moved into fifth place for Big Ten career
total yards. "We were not producing like we felt
we should. The big plays today were en-
couraging."
In fact, the whole Wolverine offense was en-
couraging yesterday. However, with two more
victories needed to ensure an invitation to a
major bowl, Michigan can no longer play games
with which offense it uses. Wolverine fans can
only hope that after finally standing up, yester-
day's offense will not sit back down.

A

4

M SU
defense

EVANSTON (AP) - The Michigan State defens-
ive unit held the Wildcats to minus 48 yards
rushing, and just 55 total net yards in beating Nor-
thwestern, 9-3, yesterday.
Spartan defenders also sacked Northwestern
quarterback Steve Burton seven times, intercep-
ted three of his passes and recovered two fumbles.
MICHIGAN STATE opened the scoring with
2:47 left in the first quarter when Roberts capped
a bizarre, 10-play, 23-yard drive with a one-yard
plunge.

Iowa 34, Wwonsin 14
MADISON (AP) - Chuck Long passed for 231
yards and four touchdowns and Eddie Phillips ran
for 162 yards as 15th-ranked Iowa rolled to a 34-14
victory over Wisconsin yesterday.
The Hawkeyes came out flying and scored on
four of their first five possessions. Long was
especially brilliant, completing his first 11 passes
and 13 of 15 in the first half for 179 yards.
IOWA RODE the legs of Phillips to its first
. . , , .,. . 1_3 - - . . -

for 169 yards and four touchdowns yesterday, but
Ohio State Coach Earle Bruce said his talented
sophomore tailback can do even better.
"He's an outstanding running back," Bruce said
of Byars after the 14th-ranked Buckeyes' easy 56-
17 Big Ten Conference victory over Indiana. "But
I think he can run better than he did today. I didn't
realize he had four touchdowns or that many yar-
ds."
Illinois 50, Minnesota 23

Big Ten Standings

Illinois.................
MICHIGAN...............
Iow a ............... ..........
flig Qinon

Conf.
WLT
700
610
520
520

Overall
WLT
810
720
720
720

I

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