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November 01, 1983 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-11-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4

Volleyball
vs. Central Michigan
Tonight, 7 p.m., CCRB

SPORTS

Field Hockey
vs. Toledo
Today, 3:30 p.m., Ferry Field

The Michigan Daily

Tuesday, November 1, 1983

Page 1
Michigan Football Statistics

Bo gives up on Pasadena

TEAM

Receiving

By JOHN KERR
For a moment, Michigan coach Bo Schembechler
allowed himself to be wildly optimistic.
"We still ;have a shot in the dark," Bo said at
yesterday's media luncheon about the Wolverines'
Rose Bowl chances. Then, after thinking it over for a
few seconds, reality set in. "Nah," Bo muttered, "it's
over."
YES, IT'S definitely over. All Illinois must do to
make the trip to Pasadena is win two of its final three
games. Since the Illini's opponents are Minnesota,
Indiana and Northwestern, there is not much doubt.
For the first time in his career at Michigan, Bo is
faced with the fact that with three games left in the
conference season, his team has virtually no shot at
playing ip the Grandaddy of them all.
He as visibly disappointed.

"Yeah, my team is down," Schembechler said.
"But so is their coach."
BO WAS SO upset after his team's 16-6 loss to
Illinois that he said he "didn't get to bed" last Satur-
day night. "I was so mad, I didn't even read the
scores (in Sunday's paper)," he said.
But Bo wasn't as upset with the loss itself as he was
with some of the circumstances surrounding it. "I
don't think we played as well as we hoped," he said.
"The kicking game was a problem. It never got us
field position. Not once did we kick 'em down there
(deep into Illini territory)."
It wasn't only his team that Schembechler thought
had an off day. The officials had their problems too,
according to Bo, especially on a couple of Vince Bean
"catches."
"I CAN ONLY say they missed the calls," Bo said.

"It's obvious they missed them. They also missed an
interference call. Illinois probably would have won
the game anyway, but they did take us out of a couple
of drives."
The Illionis game is over, however, and Bo knows
it. He also knows that the Wolverines still have a good
shot at making a prestigious bowl game.
"The truth of the matter is, that there is a lot out
there yet," he said. "If we win three games we'll be 9-
2. My guess is that then we'll be anywhere from
Dallas to Honolulu. We could be anywhere and we'll
play an exciting opponent.
"That's the beauty of the bowl games," said Bo,
"there's something special out there yet. I think
we've got something to work for."
But if Michigan ends up 8-3, will it still make a
decent bowl? "Yeah," Bo said. How about 7-4? "We'll
probably play in the Kalamazoo Open."

FACULTY SALARY
EDITION,
is coming November 10
- one of our most popular issues
- long-lasting value to readers as a reference guide
- an extra 1000 copies are sold
Advertise now while space
is still available
Contact your sales representative or
The Michigan Daily to reserve your space
Advertising deadline is November 4!
Ul ie irbictn IOUIIQ

Golfers fir
By PHIL NUSSEL
Midterms, cold weather, and cold
shooting all made the fall season finale
a little miserable for the Michigan
women's golf team this past weekend
as the team finished fifth in a six-team
tournament at Bowling Green.
The Wolverines' 683 total was 60
strokes behind the winner, Michigan
State. The Spartans' Paige Green was
medalist with rounds of 75 and 76. Penn
State (642 total) finished second,
followed by Bowling Green A (647)

"
nush poorly
finishing third and Ferris State (678)
was fourth.
BECAUSE OF heavy midterm
schedules, the Wolverines lost the ser-
vices of three of their top 10 golfers:,
Sandy Barron, Luanne Cherney, and
Bridget Syron. "Midterms made it kind
of hard," head coach Sue LeClair said.
"If I could have eight girls who could
have scores in the 80s, then it wouldn't
hurt so much."
According to LeClair, the 40-degree
temperatures and heavy winds also had
bad effects on the team. The Bowling
Green course, known for wind even on
calmer days, was more difficult than
usual.
Freshman Val Maddill led Michigan
with a 161 total. Fellow freshman Missy
Bauer followed at 162.
Le Clair'expressed a positive attitude
about the team's fall performance. "I
think we are much improved over last
season," she said. "At the beginning of
the season, I thought scores around 85
would make us competitive, but now
scores have to be 80 or under to be com-
petitive."

Total First Downs .
Rushing .........
Passing .........
Penalty.........
Total Net Yards ...
Total Plays ......
Avg Per Play....
Avg Per Game.
Net Rushing Yards
Total Attempts ..
Avg Per Play...
Avg Per Game..
Net Passing Yards.
Att/Comp/Int ...
Avg Per Att .....
Avg Per Comp ...
Avg Per Game ...
Punt/Yds/Avg ....
Pt Rt/Yds/Avg ....
KO Rt/Yds/Avg ...
Int/Yds/Avg.......
Fumbles/Lost.
Penalties/Yds ..
Scoring
Total Pts/Avg ...
Touchdowns .....
Rushing ...
Passing ...
Other .......
PATK/Att .......
2 pt Conv/Att ....
Field Goals/Att..
Safety........
Third Dn Conv/Att.
Success Pct .....
INDI
R
Rogers ............
K. Smith.........
S. Smith.........
Garrett.........
Rice...........
Logue...........
Armstrong ........
Perryman .........
White .............
Hall .............
S. Johnson........
Wilcher ...........

M
193
128
50
5
3017
604
5.0
377.1
2176
452
4.8
272.0
841
152/77/9
5.5
11.1
105.1
29/1078/37.2
25/245/9.8
12/235/19.6
12/91/7.6
10/3
41/320

Opp
121
51
65
5
2043
476
4.3
255.4
734
252
2.9
91.7
1309
224/132/12
5.8
9.9
163.6
44/1799/40.9
8/21/2.6
24/412/17.2
9/155/17.2
12/8
37/312

MICHIGAN........76 841 11.1
Opponents......... 132 1309 9.9 9
Scoring
TDr TDp TDo FG TB
Rogers .............. 9if
Bergeron ............ 11-12 4'.
S. Smith.............. 4 2(
K. Smith........... 3
Rice ................. 2 1 18
Schlopy ............. 1-2 9'
Bean.................. 1 6-4
Carthens. ............ 1 6
Garrett.............. 1 6
Hall ................. 1 6
Logue ............... 1 6
Mallory....... 1 6
Mercer .......:...... 1 6
Nelson................. 1 6
Perryman...........1 6
MICHIGAN......... 22 5 1 12-14 224
Opponents...........s3 9 1 5-8 110
T~r-Rush TDp-Pass TDo-Other

Nelson..........
Bean ..............
Rogers..........
K. Smith..........
Carthens..........
Garrett............
Armstrong.......
Markray ..........
G. Johnson.
Rice .............

224/28.0 110/13.7
28 12
22 3
5 9
1 1
20/25 11/11
0/3 2/2
12/14 5/8
0 1
54/114 36/101
.474 .356
VIDUAL
fushing

No
26
17
14
7
3
3
3
1
.1

Yds
304
259
106
49
59
20
13
17
12
2

Avg
11.7
15.2
7.6
7.0
19.7
6.7
4.3
17.0
12.0
2.0

Field Goals
20-29 30-39 40-49 50 +
Bergeron...........3-3 5-5 3-3 0-1
Schloppy.............. .1-2

Tot
11-12
1-2

Att
144
77
64
54
30
35
9
11
10
9
7
1
1

Yds
705
402
336
254
151
140
56
43
37
29
16
9
-2

Avg
4.9
5.2
5.2
4.7
5.0
4.0
5.2
3.9
3.7
3.2
2.3
9.0
-2.0

TD
9
3
4
0
1
2
0
1
0
0
0

MICHIGAN..........3-3 6-7 3-3 0-1 12-14
Opponents...........1-1 2-4 1-2 1-1 5-8
Punting
GP No Yds Avg Long
Bracken.............. 8 28 1063 38.0 53
Team ............... 1 15 15.0 15
MICHIGAN.......... 8 29 1078 37.2 53
Opponents........... 8 44 1799 40.9 58
Returns
PR/Yds/Avg/LP KOR/Yds/Avg/LP
Cooper .........19/202/10.6/41
G. Johnson .... 6/43/7.2/12 4/60/15.0/28
K. Smith ...... 3/85/28.3/38
S. Johnson ..2/28/14.0/20
Rogers .....1/25/25.0/25
Wilcher ....... 1/23/23.0/23
White 1/14/14.0/14

MICHIGAN ........452 2176 4.8 22
Opponents......... 252 734 2.9 3
Passing
PA PC Int Pct Yds
S. Smith .............129 65 7 .504 749
Hall ................. 22 11 2 .500 92
Harbaugh............ 1 0 0 .000 0

MICHIGAN..........152
Opponents........... 224

76
132

9 .500 841
12 .589 1309

MICHIGAN ...
Opponents .....

25/245/9.8/41
8/21/2.6/13

12/235/19.6/38
24/412/17.2/29

A

420 Maynard

764-0560

Barron
... misses tourney

Ultimate game hooks club

;

How to have class between classes.

By TED LERNER
The scenario changes but the results
are usually the same: off in the distan-
ce, a student sees a bunch of people
throwing and chasing a colorful disc. It
looks strange because the disc floats
and hovers above the ground.
He walks towards the action. As he
gets closer, he realizes they're playing
with that favorite beach toy, the
frisbee. Inquiring, he is told the people
are playing ultimate frisbee, an action
packed game that anyone can play. He

ted playing other dorm teams. That's
how I met some guys from the club."
ONE REASON for the sport's
growing popularity is its simplicity.
Each team consists of seven players
playing on a football-type field. The p-
layers throw the frisbee to teammates,
trying to advance it downfield and into
the end zone. The only restriction of
movement comes when a player holds;
the frisbee. He must remain in place.
"Ultimate is modeled after soccer,"
said Feeman. "It involves a lot of run-
ning and training. It's a continuous ac-
tion game. Wherever there's an incom-
plete pass, it (the frisbee) immediately
changes possession and the other team
picks it up and throws it towards the
other goal."
Michigan's ultimate club obviously
puts a lot of energy into its play. This
year's men's squad placed second in
the state, then went on to the regionals
in Carbondale, Ill. where it placed in
the top eight out of 16 teams. That
finish, though, did not qualify the team
for nationals.
In general, weekly competition, the
ultimate team competes with mid-
western and eastern teams. About 50
percent of the teams it plays are
associated with colleges.
THE ULTIMATE CLUB also has a
good women's team.
"The women's team was formed in
the fall of '81," said Feeman."They are
really growing at a faster rate than the'
men's team. In ultimate, women can
get training and exercise and they're
not going to get knocked around."
For anybody- ultimate can provide

likes what he sees. Next week, he takes
the field to play ultimate. He is hooked.
"I STARTED PLAYING ultimate as
a sophomore in college," said graduate
student Tim Feeman, co-captain of the
Michigan Frisbee club. "I saw an ad in
the newspaper. These guys just wanted
to get together and play. It was ex-
tremely addictive. After three days I
was hooked."
Geir Kvaran, an ultimate club mem-
ber, picked up the sport in a different
way but has similar enthusiasm.
"I bought a frisbee and it had some
sketchy rules on how to play ultimate,"
he said. "Some friends and me started
playing. I started playing in Ann Arbor
with guys from my dorm. Then we star-

training and exercise and, of course;
fun. The club's looking for new players:
for the indoor season this winter and
you do not have to be an expert. If you
want to join, call Feeman at 663-3854.
Remember, though, you could be easily
hooked.
Gridde Picks
Silly Shelly Sadler picked 16 winner
last week and for her expertise she wil
receive a one-item pizza. This marks 8,231
consecutive weeks that Griddes was no
won by a Hare Krishna.
How can this alarming statistic be, ex
plained?
For one thing Hare Krishnas only pid
teams that make their conversion
because that's how they get new members
The reason you never see a Hare Kristin
at a Michigan game is because the seat:
are too small to sit Indian style, and they
also don't like the way Steve Smith chants
But most of all they can't figure out wh3
the fans sing a fight song that pays homagi
to a cough drop.
All you football crazed Hare Krishnas
turn in your picks by midnight Friday a
Pizza Bob's on S. State or Church or at thi
Daily offices.
1. Purdue at MICHIGAN (pick score)
2. Illinois at Minnesota
3. Ohio State at Indiana
4. Michigan State at Northwestern
5. Iowa at Wisconsin
6. Pittsburgh at Norte Dame
7. Washington at Arizona
8. Arizona State at California
9. Oklahoma at Missouri
10. Stanford at Southern California
11. Alabama at Louisiana State
12. Maryland at Auburn
13. Georgia at Florida
14. East Carolina at Miami
15. Clemson atiNorth Carolina
16. Colgate at Pennsylvania
17. Holy Cross at Harvard
18. Prairie View at Arkansas-Pine Bluff
19. Southern Conneticut at Cal Poly-
San Luis Obispo
20. Purdue Trouble-Makers at DAILY
LIBELS

constantly using the knowledge acquired through my
paralegal training at RooseIt."
-Anm Brill Estates, Wills and rusts Graduate
LAWYER'S ASSISTANT:
A GROWTH CAREER
FOR THE 801s
Training as a Lawyer's Assistant can give today's college
graduate a valuable edge in the job market.
Entry-level positions in the Chicago area pay as much as
512,000 to 515,0()-and some paralegals are now earning
as much as 532,000.
It takes just three months of daytime study (six months in the
evening) to prepare for a career as a Lawyer's Assistant. The
program at Roosevelt University is the largest A.B.A. -approved
program in Illinois, and its record of graduate employment
assistance is the best there is.
FOR INFORMATION AND A FREE BROCHURE
CALL (312) 341-3882
OR MAIL HIS COUPON TODAY!
RECRUITER ON CAMPUS, NOVEMBER 8, 1983

AP Top Twenty

Indulge yourself in a warm cup of Cafe Vienna. It's a light and cin-
namony touch of class. And just one of six deliciously different flavors
from General Foodsl y
International Coffees. ----
,e-r'. T-T) AT r'l'tT' T T' DT rN A'MCI'\NT A T ,'-CI~T'Q1"1"'

1. Nebraska (57) ......
2. Texas (2)..........
3. Auburn .............
4. Georgia..........
5. Miami (Fla.)......
6. Illinois ..............

9-0-0
7-0-0
7-1-0
7-0-1
8-1-0
7-1-0

1178
1123
1048
954
952
896

I

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