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October 30, 1983 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-10-30

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The Michigan Daily, Sunday, October 30, 1983 - Page 5
Trick-or-treating
taboo in some towns
From the Associated Press

Trick-or-treating has been banned in
one small West Virginia town, while
police officers will be doling out the
sweets in Louisville, Ky., and adults in
the Midwest and South might see a few
hobgoblins if they drink too much Wit-
ch's Brew on Halloween.
The tampered candy scares that
marred last year's celebrations are
just a memory, say town officials, but
some are still a little spooked.
IN HURRICANE, W. Va., Mayor
Raymond Peak has declared any trick-
or-treating tomorrow taboo to protect
children in this small community about
25 miles west of Charleston.
"We had a couple of cases last year
where children were given apples with
razor blades in them," Peak said.
As an alternative, the community is
sponsoring a costume party for
children 13 and under and a "haunted
house" for older teen-agers.
"WE DON'T want to take anything
away from the kids," Peak said. "We stil
want them to have Halloween. It's just
that we want to centralize it so we can
control it."
However, local children seemed less
than thrilled.
I don't like it," said Kevin Bell, a
fourth-grader. "I'd rather go trick-or-
treating any day than go to some old
party."
LAST YEAR, trick-or-treating was
banned in at least 40 communities after
a nationwide rash of candy-tampering,
apparently triggered by seven Chicago-
area deaths from cyanide-laced Extra-
Strength Tylenol capsules. In com-

munities where trick-or-treating was
permitted, there were no reports of
problems.
This year, children in Louisville, Ky.,
will be chaisng down police cars
tomorrow night, if all goes as planned.
Uniformed officers in marked cars
will be cruising the streets, stopping
periodically to pass out treats to
children, said police spokesman Carl
Yates. The variation on the door-to-
door tradition is to insure that children
get untampered candy, he said.
IN WESTPORT, Conn., a hypodermic
syringe with traces of heroin and
cocaine on it was discovered in a carton
of Halloween candy at a supermarket,
but authorities said Friday they doub-
ted intentional tampering was the
motive.
The state Health Services Department
in Hartford confirmed the presence of
the drugs on the syringe but said the
candy was not contaminated. Officials
speculated a drug user discarded the
needle in the box.
And while Halloween is traditionally
children's night out, a St. Louis bar
owner and small-time beer baron has
created Witch's Brew for the young at
heart.
"NO, IT'S not orange," said Joe
Edwards. "But it does come in a distin-
ctive orange-and-black can which says
right on the label that it is distrubuted
by the Full Moon Distributing Co."
The beer will be available in seven
states in the Midwest and South this
year, "and so far the response has been
great," Edwards said.

_________________________________ -. -" .
Daily Photo by DEBORAH LEWIS
Once a student at the University, now a professor, Frank Beaver, widely known for his communication class - Introduction to Film - threads
another movie in the TV Studio of the Freize Building.

ENCOURAGES FILM MAKING AS A CAREER :

Prof directs students into film

By KAREN TENSA
Since he was nine years old, Frank
Beaver has wanted to be a theatre and
film director.
"I wrote a letter addressed to one of
the studios in Hollywood saying I was
available if they needed any talent,"
recalled the communications professor.
FOR BEAVER, a native of Elmwood,
N.C., population 250, "movies were my
escape."
"I saw every film made in the late
1940s and early 1950s. I'd go to the

PROFILE_
p.m. show, dash to the 3 p.m., and then
to the five o'clock movie and then I
would catch a bus home by seven," he
said. "It made me really want to be a
part of the business."
In addition to his interest in movies,
Beaver also had a "special interest in
writing and the arts" while he was
growing up.
"THE TEACHERS were interested in
helping people with special interest,"
he said. "I had an English teacher who
was a major influence in my life. She
tutored me in Latin, in addition to
teaching me playwrighting and writing
criticism."
As a result of winning several essay
writing contests in high school, Beaver
received a four-year scholarship to the
University of North Carolina-Chapel
Hill where he earned a bachelor's
degree in radio, television, and motion
pictures and a master's in
television/film direction.
"My goal was to go to Greenwich
Village," said Beaver, who had several
of his plays produced at Chapel Hill.
BUT HIS DRAFT deferment ran out
after he graduated, and in 1962 he en-
tered the army. Beaver attended army
intelligence school and went to Vietnam
at the end of the year.
When he left the army a year later,
Beaver reconsidered his career goals.
Because his teachers at Chapel Hill and
in high school had been such an influen-
ce on him, he considered teaching as an
option to working directly on films.
Although he only had a master's
degree, Beaver found a job at Memphis
State University.
"I COULD write criticism, make
films the way artists do in art school,
and still exercise what I had learned
and support my family at the same
time." he said.

The next year, Chapel Hill invited
Beaver to return there to teach.
Through a multi-million dollar grant
the university received to produce films
on population, Beaver wrote, directed,
produced, and edited a documentary
for the South Population Council. The
film was translated into other
languages and distributed abroad.
"That really made me committed to
the experience of being able to teach
filmmaking, which a lot of drama
teachers don't want to do, as well as to
be a film critic and write about films
and teach about the art of film," he
said.
BEAVER EVENTUALLY decided he
wanted to get a Ph.D and the University
was one of five schools which accepted
him.
"It was the kind of program I wan-
ted," he said. "It combined an oppor-
tunity to work with theatre directing,
playwrighting, offered a lot of produc-
tion couses as well as having English
department courses in literary
criticism and playwrighting.
"For someone who sees himself as an
artist-critic-historian, it seemed like
the perfect place to go."
BEAVER EARNED a Ph.D in 1969
with a major in speech communication
and a minor in film theory, history, and
directing. He won "a couple of Hop-
woods" while a student and had one of
his plays produced.
Beaver's play was about a flower-
child traveling from Greenwich Village
to Haight-Asbury to meet her
boyfriend. At a bus station, she meets
the brother of a dead soldier from Viet-
nam waiting to receive his brother's
belongings which are being delivered
by military personnel. The dead
brother's plane had been shot down, but
his body was never recovered. The
woman didn't know why the man was in
the bus station.
The Hopwood Award-winning play,
which Beaver remembers as being
"kind of funny," was the first play on
Vietnam produced in the United States.
"I WAS interested in the rhetoric -
what would happen if two people of that
generation got together," he explained.
"Being a student here in the late 1960s,
I was very curious about the way ac-
tivists spoke. The way they talked
about revolution. Their need to talk- to
get out into the streets."
Because of his personal tie to Viet-
nam, Beaver said he has a special in-
terest in movies about the war. He
compares himself to the characters at
the end of The Deer Hunter - people
who want to believe there was a reason
behind fighting in Southeast Asia.

When Beaver taught his first film
class at the University in the fall of
1968, one of his students was Lawrence
Kasden, writer and director of Body
Heat and The Big Chill, who was in
town last week to speak to classes.
"I THOUGHT Larry had tremendous
talent. He's certainly a product of the
University," he said.
Although Beaver admits the Univer-
sity's film program "is not highly
sophisticated," students who are in-
terested in film do have the opportunity
to learn what they need t know.
"University graduates are exposed to
good films, they get good training and
they get good jobs," he said. Beaver
said the most frustrating aspect f the
program is that few students get to
work in production. To ease the
problem, Beaver said he tries to get

them into graduate workshops so they
can gain some exposure.
According to Beaver many Univer-
sity film students become nationally
competitive.
Two years ago, for example, two
University students were nominated for
Academy Awards in the documentary
category.
"We do a lot in our program with
very little money," Beaver explained. "The
students don't become discouraged and
there's a miracle in that."
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The University of Michigan
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE,
AND THE ARTS
Eighth Distinguished
Senior Faculty Lecture Series
GARDNER ACKLEY
Henry Carter Adams
Distinguished University Professor
of Political Economy
in a three-part series, will discuss
Some Uses of Economics
NOVEMBER 1
The Growth of Economic Knowledge
NOVEMBER 3
The Size and Economic Roles of Government
NOVEMBER 8
tC-,n brnmant *CtEahiU'h- inn P li

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1983

-~ a 0 Mom

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