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October 28, 1983 - Image 21

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-10-28
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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Ru'stic
The Whiffletree
603 W. Huron
Hours: Monday-Thursday, 11:30 a.m.-
-midnight
Friday-Saturday, 11:30 a.m.-1 a.m.
Sunday, 4 p.m.-midnight
By Eli Cohen
T HE quintessential dilemma:
your parents are coming up
to Ann Arbor for the first time
and they want to takedyou outto
dinner, but where do you go?
Picture this scene. You have a gran-
dmother who only eats meat, but the
steaks can be no tougher than ap-
plesauce. Your sister, on the other
hand, assumes that food means a
brown, flat thing between two tan
pieces of dough. But your father is a
world traveler who enjoys everything
from barnacles to tripe. And your
mother is on the new fiber and feta diet.
Where do you go?
Ann Arbor presents many choices.
The Gandy Dancer is a favorite among
alums. They like to reminisce about

bumping into friends at the old train
station. For lunch it's the Pretzel Bell,
with its ultra-collegiate atmosphere
and food. But for first-time visitors the
conservative restaurant goer would
choose the Whiffletree. But why?'
The ambience, if we may be so chic to
even refer to it as that, is stolid to say
the least. It is nice, typical-even
pleasant if you like that sort of thing. It
is not neo-new wave or ethnic or even
truck-stop chic. It is your typical rustic
style Midwestern family watering-
hole/meeting place.
The Whiffletree is fashioned after
Chicago's Claim Company, one of the
first of those BBQ/American-Mexican
places. The booths are high, and wood,
covered with lacquer. Everything
about the place exudes the Old West in
1983. It is all pseudo-rustic and pseudo-
ranchy. But it is stolid. You can be
sure that no one in your party will be of-
fended by the decor at the Whiffletree.
But why have I waited till the fourth
paragraph to even mention the food at
the Whiffletree? This is the
prioritization that the restaurant itself
uses. The food is not the most impor-
tant part of the place. You cannot com-
pare. the Whiffletree to a family-run
ethnic restaurant like Angelo's or
Kana. This is not to say that the food at
the Wiffletree is not good, but it isn't
anything special. In other words, the
food, like the decor, is stolid. It is very

0
_O
O
N)
D)
v)

EDUCATING RITA Either way, he's back a
Michael Caine is an alcoholic professor who Theater, 210 St. Fifth; 7611
becomes the mentor of an aspiring young student in THE OSTERMAN WEEK
this comedy. (Movies at Briarwood, Brairwood Mall, Sam Peckinpah return
769-8780) this tale of mystery and
I IIu FINAL TERROR Ludlum's book. (State Tht
FRingin Halloween (for lack of a better reason) .LICADPR'sOR-(HaER
ANGELO, MY LOVE with this new horror-adventure film. (Wayside Here we go again with
Robert Duvall makes his directing debut with this Theater; 3020 Washtenaw; 434-1782) Richard Pryor. Like his l
screenplay he authored about a young Gypsy boy FLASH DANCE filmed montage of Pryori
who is street-smart, yet lovable. (Ann Arbor Oh what a feeling! Jennifer Beals dances (well, want to see more Pryor m
Theater, 210 S. Fifth.; 761-9700) almost) the night away. (Fox Village Theater, Maple yu FxvlaeTet
THE BIG CHILL Village; 769-1300). THE RIGHT STUFF
Seven University alumni gather together at the GREY FOX No, it's not John Glen
funeral of a friend, the, results being humorous and Old-timer Richard Farnsworth gave birth to a new push thisfi o
(Movies at Briarwood, Briarwood Mall; 769o780) career after co-starring in Comes a Horseman with benefit by its success. H
BRAINSTOR MJane Fonda. Now he gives another moving perfor- good in the film adaptati
BRISOMmance in this Western. (Movies at Briarwood, inside story of the NASAs
Natalie Wood's last film finally makes it to the Briarwood Mall; 769-8780)co Briarwood, Biawdo oE
screen, thanks to much lobbying on the part of direc- MR. MOM
tor Douglas Trumbull. The sci-fi thriller also stars A tired attempt at a tired theme. Mr Mom looks at RISKY BU E
Christopher Walken and Cliff Robertson. (Fox- role reversal with all the charm of a wet liver. (The A dozen pubescent high-
village Theater, Maple village; 769-1300) Fox Village Theater, Maple Village; 769-1300). about love, life, college in
FxHgTDEADiZ;O-E)(Movies at Briarwood, Br
THE DEAD ZONE NEVER SAY NEVER AGAIN
Stephen King's newest story deals with the psychic What an apt title for Sean (I'll never do another ROMANTIC COMEDY
powers of a man who awakens from a coma after five Bond movie") Connery. To some he is the only 007, Broadway comes to i
long years. (State Theater, 231 S. State; 602-6264) to others he's just an old man out to make a buck. Dudley Moore and Mary

nd he's Bond. (Ann Arbor
;9701).
KEND
s to the director's chair with
I intrigue based on Robert
heater 231S. State; 662-6264)
:RE AND NOW
h yet another "movie" by
ast few efforts, this is just a
in concert. Assuming you
onologues, this movie is for
r, Maple village; 769-1300)
n's campaign office that is
gently-but Glenn sure will
e comes off looking pretty
on of the novel that tells the
space program. (Movies at
fall; 769-8780)
-school hormonalites learn
interviews and prostitution.
iarwood Mall; 769-8780).
the screen once again as
Steenburgen star in what

Moore uniqu
(Movies at B
STRANGE IT
Paul LeM
tongue-in-chi
travel. (Mov
8780)
TRADING P1
Dan Akroyd
turns out a re
Live. (Fox
1300).
UNDER FIR
A photojou
conflict becor
begins to lose
Theater. 231:l
THE WILD
Punk rocke
drama. (Ca
6416)
ZELIG
Has Wood
count on it. A
twist in pseu
State; 662-6

The Whiffletree: Midwestern provincialism

dependable, and very well quality-
controlled, but then again so is Mc-
Donald's. Here it truly is hot, fresh,
and food.
Whatever you order you won't be
disappointed, unless you are expecting
something very special and very
imaginative. Like the Claim Company
in Chicago, the BBQ ribs are quite nice
if all you've eaten are dorm ribs, but if
you live in the South then you'll find the
spare ribs at the Whiffletree somewhat
disappointing. They are poor Northern
imitations of the real thing.
Similarly the Mich-Mex specialties
are like most of Ann Arbor, very unlike
the original. I don't mean to say this
isn't a good restaurant, because the

food and the decor combine to make a
pleasant evening for everyone if the
family. Even your grandmother will
find the waitresses and the cooks adap-
table enough for her wooden teeth.
So the next time your extended
family decides to drop in on you unex-
pectedly, and is relying on your inside
knowledge of the Ann Arbor eating
scene, choose the Whiffletree at 208
West Huron. But if it is a few hours out-
side of the Midwestern provincialism
of Ann Arbor that you crave when you
go out to eat. Or if you like your
Mexican food spicier than they serve in
the dorms then don't choose Whiffletree
as a Sunday night escape, because you
undoubtedlywill be disappointed. FW

i(mOuf

dde

d

I

r-

Korean Barbeque (Bul-Go-Gee)

Oriental feast

Be-Bim-Bob
"Breakfast All Day"
1313 S. University
769-2288

Curry Rice
New Hours:
Open Mon. 7:30-3:00
Tues.-Fri. 7:30-8:00
Sat., Sun. 8:30-8:30

- ----------

GARDEN
Restaurant
SZECH UAN, HUNAN, AND
PEKING CUISINE
Chef Jan - winner of Best Chef Award
in Washington, D.C. and 1983 Judges
Special Award by Michigan Restaurant
Association
" Rated #1 in carryout service by the
Ann Arbor News
" Selected the Best Chinese Restaurant by
the Mich'igan Daily
3035 Washtenaw Ave., Ann Arbor
TAKE OUT SERVICE
RESERVATIONS 971.0970
PARTIES WELCOME
Open 7 Days a week 11:30am-10pm

1 Re
AAA Magazine Editor, Len Barnes,
rates Forbidden City No. 1
* COCKTAILS
* DINING
* CARRY OUT
" SUNDAY BUFFET
" MOST COMPLETE
WINE MENU
* LUNCHEON SPECIAL
includes soup, eggroll & fried rice
SZE CHUAN, HUNAN and
MANDARIN SPECIALTIES
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
FORBIDDEN CITY WEST
3535 Plymouth Rd.
665-3591
FORBIDDEN CITY EAST
4905 Washtenow Ave.
434-7978

nternational assimilation brings
food from the Far East, through
western Europe and the East Coast to
the Midwest, where it thrives in the
dining establishments of Ann Arbor.
The solution to many dietary deman-
ds, Oriental cuisine satisfies both the
S 1e-CkmtaWWI1
e COCKTAILS e DINING
e CARRY OUT
e LUNCHEON SPECIALS
Szechuan, Hunan and
Mandarin Specialties
DETROIT NEWS.SAYS:
"This is the
hot place to dine."
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
2161 W. STADIUM
(East of Liberty)
769-5722
All Major Credit Cards Accepted

body and the budget. Dishes combining
vegetables with meat of poultry and
starch supply patrons with complete
nutritional smorgesborgs in every
meal. Infinite food and flavor com-
binations make Oriental cuisine a con-
stant supplier of variety.
Oriental restaurants also solve the
contradiction between pleasant dining
atmospheres and budget and time-
restricted lifestyles. Providing the
privileges of dining out, Oriental
restaurants manage to remain affor-
dable and efficient.
In addlition, most establishments of-
fer take-out service for greater con-
venience. Take-out cuisine, the
panacea . of college students and
working mothers, reaches levels of un-
parallelled excellence in Oriental
restaurants.
"Made in America" has met its mat-
ch in the likes of Oriental cuisine. In-
satiable appetites and nutrition seekers
alike, Oriental cuisine serves something
for everyone. With economy in mind,
food from the Orient is both gratifying
and feasible.
-Julie Winokur
Join the
Daily
Arts Staff

IN THE REALM OF THE SENSES (Nagisa Oshima,
1977)
Sada the Geisha and her lover Kishi get more and
more erotic as they isolate themselves from the
world. This X-rated story is true. Japanese with sub-
titles. (Cinema Guild; Lorch Hall, 7:00,9:05)
MURDER AT THE GALLUP (George Pollock, 1963)
Margaret Rutherford is Miss Marple and Robert
Morley a stable-owner who falls in love with her and
her case-solving abilities as she solves a case in-
volving a recluse's death. From Agatha Christie's
novel After the Funeral. (Alternative Action; MLB 4,
7:00)
MURDER AT 45 RPM (George Pollock, 1964)
Another Miss Marple adventure film with Margaret
Rutherford. (Alternative Action; MLB 4, 8:30)
MURDER.SHE SAID (George Pollock, 1962)
Once again, Margaret Rutherford is Agatha
Christie's sleuth. This time, she sees a murder on a
train, but the police don't want to get involved, so she
becomes a domestic in order to solve it herself.
(Alternative Action; MLB 4, 10:15)
THE HORROR OF DRACULA (Terence Fisher,
1958)
Christopher Lee and Peter Cushing star as the
death of a friend leads Cushing onward to vampire
Lee in one of the first Dracula stories to take advan-
tage of color to add something to the oft-told tale.
(Ann Arbor Film Coop; Nat. Sci. Audi, 7:00)
TASTE THE BLOOD OF DRACULA (Peter Sasdy,
1970)
Christopher Lee dons fangs and cape once again.
Three 19th-century English noblemen revive the
Count. In lieu of a thank you note, he enslaves their
children. (Ann Arbor Film Coop; Nat. Sci. AuO.,
8:30)
NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD (George Romero,
1968)
Radiation canpbe bad for you. Just ask the peo-
ple who are trapped in a farmhouse, surrounded
by radioactive ghouls who like to eat raw human
flesh. Such a nice way to end the evening's
Halloween triple feature. (Ann Arbor Film
Coop; Nat. Sci. Aud., 10:15)
TAXI DRIVER (Martin Scorcese, 1976)
Robert DeNiro is a Vietnam vet cruising the
streets of New York in a cab while he plans to
eliminate all the city's less healthy elements. The
viole. film has Bernard Herrmann's final film
score. (Cinema 2; Aud, A, 7:00, 9:00)

THE TREASURE OF THE SIERRA MADRE
(John Huston, 1948)
Huston won Oscars for Best Screenplay and
Best Director, for his work on this film. Bogart
stars as one of three prospectors who get har-
dened by greed, to the point of killing each other
with little guilt. (Alternative Action; Nat. Sci.
Aud., 9:15)
LA CAGE AUX FOLLES (E. Molinaro, 1979)
La Cage aux Folles is the name of a nightclub run
by two homosexuals, whose son wants to get
married. The parents try to put on a straighter ap-
pearance for the son's benefit. French with subtitles.
(Mediatrics; MLB 3,6:30,8:15, 10:00)
SINGIN' IN THE RAIN (Gene Kelly and Stanley
Donen, 1952)
The rain is really mixed with milk, which shows up
better on film, but it really is Gene Kelly, ~Debbie
Reynolds, and Donald O'Connor singing in it in this
spoof of the early days of talkies. (Hill Street
Cinema; 1429 Hill, 7:45, 9:45)
YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN (Mel.Brooks,.1973)
One of Mel Brooks' best, it's a hilarious spoof of all
the Frankenstein stories with the usual Brooks gang
- Madeleine Kahn, GeneWilder, Peter Boyle, Marty
Feldman, etc. (Classic Film Theater; Michigan
Theater, 7:05, 10:40)
HIGH ANXIETY (Mel Brooks, 1977)
Not as good as Young Frankenstein, but Mel
Brooks' homage to Hitchcock with himself, Harvey
Korman, Cloris Leachman is still funny. (Classic
Fili Theater; Michigan Theater, 9:00)
LOCAL HERO (Bill Forsyth, 1983)
Burt Lancaster's oil company wants to develop an
oil field in Scotland and sends an emmisary there to
arrange the sale. It's a gentle, surprising kind of
comedy that is very funny in spots. From the direc-
tor of Gregory's Girl. (Cinema 2; Aud. A, 7:00, 9:00)
THE MAN WHO FELL TO EARTH (Nicholas Roeg,
1976)
David Bowie is an alien. He comes to Earth to find
the water needed to save his race. Candy Clark, Buck
Henry, and Rip Torn also star. (Ann Arbor Film
Coop; MLB4,7:00,9:30)

Kelly: Singin' in the milk
THAT'S ENTERTAINMENT (Jack Haley, Jr., 1974)
MGM decides to salute its glory days of musicals,
and the screen lights up with a wonderful com-
pilation with lots of Hollywood magic and celebrity.
(Hill Street Cinema, 1429 Hill, 7:00, 9:30)
OUTLAND (Peter Hyams, 1981)
Tense and brilliantly filmed chases on Jupiter's
moon lo are the highlight of a highly entertaining, if
not all that realistic, thriller statring Sean Connery.
(Mediatrics; MLB 4, 7:00, 9:00)

plays the le
with a bootl
Cooper in,
business hin

IN THE HE
1967)
Rod Steige
formance as
must join fo
Poitier) to s
for Best Pi
Cinema; 1421

RED BEARD (Akira Kurosawa, 1965)
Toshiro Mifune stars in a film about a young doctor
who learns the meaning of life as he works in a free
clinic under Red Beard's tutelage. Japanese with
subtitles. (Cinema Guild; Lorch Hall, 7:00, FREE)

COME BACK, LITTLE SHEBA (Daniel Mann, 1953)
Shirley Boothe won an Oscar for her role in this
adaptation of William Inge's play. She plays the
husband of a doctor (Burt Lancaster) who has fallen
into chiropractice. (Cinema Guild; Lorch Hall, 7:00)
THE RAINMAKER (Joseph Anthony, 1956)
The third Burt Lancaster film in twonights has
him playing a rain-dancing con man who falls for
Katherine Hepburn, who got an Oscar nomination for
her performance. (Cinema Guild; Lorch Hall, 8:45)
SABOTEUR (Alfred Hitchcock, 1942)
Robert Cummings plays a classic Hitchcock role.
The police think he's a murderer. He knows he knows
some munitions plant saboteurs. It all ends at the
Statue of Liberty. (Cinema 2; Aud. A, 7:00)
FOREIGN CORRESPONDENT (Alfred Hitchcock,
1940)
Hitchcock's first American film has an American
journalist looking for a kidnapped diplomat. Watch
closely, for a lot of the clues are visual. (Cinema 2;
Aud. A, 9:00)

KEY LARGO (John Huston, 1948)
Humphrey Bogarit, Edward G. Robinson and
Lauren'Bacall are on hand for an adaptation of
Maxwell Anderson's play about a gangster who
holds people, including ex-soldier Bogart,
hostage in a hotel during a hurricane. (Alter-
native Action; Nat. Sci. Aud., 7:30)

DICK TRACY (William Witney and John English,
1941)
Chester Gould's detective gets caught in flaming
peril. Or at least that's what the title of episode 10
would indicate. (Cinema Guild; Lorch Hall, 6:30)
THE MALTESE FALCON (John Huston, 1941)
Humphrey Bogart goes looking for the famous
jeweled bird in an entertaining detective story with
all the cliches you could ever want. Bogart plays
Sam Spade in the film from Phillip Marlowe's novel.
(Cinema Guild; Lorch Hall, 7:00, 10:20)
CITY STREETS (Rouben Mamoulian,1931)
Dashiel Hammett wrote the script. Gary Cooper

POTEMKIN
A classic fi
the Russian
Odessa Steps
is justifiabl3
brilliant editi
LAJETEE C
In Post-ato
past experier
in time. The s
Guild; Lorch
ALEXANDE
A score by
montage ma
battle betwee
Guild; Lorch

10 tWtekend/QO4bqr 28,-1993-

' } 7 f 1

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