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October 27, 1983 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-10-27

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ARTS

The Michigan Daily

Thursday, October 27, 1983

Page 5

Just the Tylenol we're looking for

By C. E. Krell
F IRST OFF, I want you to know that
someone is typing this stuff and it
is just 'not run off the inane press
releases that the promoters of these
events send.
That said, what do you do when you
can't stop convulsing all through your
entire trunk? I mean it. Walk around
for a while with a big black opaque
cloud developing an aura of^"get this
jerk away from me." He swears a lot.
frowns, scowls, and generally is not
pleasant. Give him 40 ounces of Old
English 800 and send him off to a
depressing teenage angst film. Send off
to more beer, more scotch, anything.

Just get him to leave us alone.
Lacking that, sit him down at a table,
with bad grammer and attitude the only
resources at his disposal. Don't talk to
him. Don't let him touch you. Send him
to the Power Center on October 27 at 8
p.m.
At the Power Center, the musical per-
formers will be Third World and
Hiroshima. The former is a
reggae/funk band signed to a big
record label and making videos. They
make OK music and probably will be
fun to watch. There is no reason for
them not to be. However, can you really
say that they will serve as some sort of
depression panacea? Who knows, eh? It
seems Third World do have a knack for
putting across the occasional good

number (whoever thought of the word
"number one" for a musical piece
wasn't thinking. I don't care if that's
what Brahms, etc. did - it just doesn't
make sense. Numbers and notes hate
each other).
Imaginary numbers can be fun
though. Here Hiroshima will be the
imaginary number. They are reported
to be a mixture of "Japanese folk mood
music and jazz ballads." (Press release
slips in oblivious). But if you're shaking
and don't feel you can understand what
people say anymore, and have wierd
dreams about unexplainable groupings
that don't get you anywhere, this
doesn't tell you much. Hiroshima may
be just the Tylenol we are looking for,
but if he doesn't like it who will he at-

tack next?
He may be done shaking, but it is still
cold and wet and he doesn't feel well.
Forget him and check the Third World
band and guest. He will be the slumped
in the seat one.
PART-TIME
EMPLOYMENT
J O ST,1
z y
SPRO, G
The U.S. Environmental Pro-
tection Agency has multiple
openings for undergraduate
students who meet our finan-
cial need criteria. Opportuni-
ties exist in engineering and
statistics/computer science.
Salaries range from $5.10 to
$5.72 per hour. Contact the
Student Employment Office,
2053 Student Activities
Building, for information and
application material or call
Beth Laird at 668-4220.
U.S. EPA
Motor Vehicle
Emission Laboratory
2565 Plymouth Road
ANN ARBOR, MI 48105
An Equal Opportunity Employer

pitch for minds &
other waste products

GARBAGE. All the societal
rejects pile up outside the
doors. Old chums, old news, old hat,
old business; discarded lovers,
spoiled memories, rotten cores.
Throw them all out; there's a space
for every waste, a place for every
paste case. Body waste, chemical
waste, waste of time, waste of mind.
Leftover popover, daily coffee grind,
orange rind. Refuse and refusals,
discards and innards, table scraps
and marital scraps, clothes in tat-
ters, printed matters. A jaundiced
eye colors the yellowing pages; a
withering voice asks what to accept,
what to reject.
And where does all the stuff go?
In Ann Arbor the junk gets dum-
ped at Platt and Ellsworth. 300 tons
returned to the earth every day, 300

tons of pure, solid (as opposed to
hazardous or liquid) garbage. 275
acres of mouth, waiting to swallow
the past our fickle fingers flick
behind; a big hole waiting to be
covered, a landfill.
'The hole was opened in 1959, for-
ming the core of the city's long-
range disposal plans. Today, the site
remains the place where the bulk of
our tired, wretched, and poor even-
ttually immigrate according to the
man who directs the trash traffic.
"I'm looking at that site being able
to take refuse for the next 10 to 15
years, depending on the refuse
volume and the final engineering,"
says John Newman, director of Ann
Arbor's Solid Waste Department
since 1980.
"Final engineering" refers to the
daily compacting and constructing
efforts of a currently 10-member
disposal staff. As the mouth
masticates, the staff shoves the
bolus together, always trying to stuff
a big load in a small space.
"Construction is a constant
operation," says Newman. Walls
are erected, sections- filled, then
walled in again. And there's always
more.
"The volume of waste generated
has been varying," Newman notes.

"Up to 1979 and 1980 the waste had
been on a constant increase. Then
the volume dropped off and now it's
stabilized."
The levelling off of waste flow is
due less to conscientious conser-
vation-oriented ' attempts to
decrease consumption than to a
economy slowdown in general and a
decrease in industrial construction
in particular, according to Newman.
Recycle Ann Arbor, a valiant
organization which is partially fun-
ded by a annual city grant of $32,000,
collects about 1400 tons of recyclable
material - mostly paper - every
year. That total represents about a
week's work for Newman's staff.
The conservationist group currently
covers only about 50% of the city,
says Newman, although it has plans
to expand operations.
Alternatives to landfill dumping
will become more urgent within the
next decade, as more of the Platt
and Ellsworth site fills up. The city
currently plans to turn over 175 of
the 275 landfill acres to the Parks
and Recreation Department; 100
acres will be released for
redevelopment within the next three
to four years, with another 75 acres
changing hands during the 1990s. To
ensure public safety, any develop-
ment plans must receive prior ap-
proval by the Department of Natural
Resources, says Newman.
As part of what Newman calls the
"master waste plan," the city recen-
tly formed three seperate commit-
tees to examine aspects and alter-
native forms of refuse disposal. One
group will look at recycling
methods, another at landfill
proposals, and another at energy
recovery possibilities.
Approximately 75% of all solid
waste is combusible, according to
Newman; this includes recyclable
material, which constitutes about 6-
8%. Several studies have cited
energy recovery through burning as
a viable alternative, but all
available methods are too expensive
to suit Ann Arbor's purposes.
And so we continue to dump.
"Landfill is going to be a part of any
disposal system," Newman says.
The disposable diapers cuddle next
to the throwaway lines and littering
fines. The man comes every week
and grinds it up with a big noise.
Then he drives away.
Garbage.

MAJOR EVENTS PRESENTS
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Ann Arbor Civic Theatre presents
THE
PHILADELPHIA STORY

Hiroshima will perform with reggae group Third World tonight at the Power Center.

- S - 33

Thurs., Oct. 27
8pm
The Power Center
$11.50, 10.50
At the Michigan Union Ticket Office,
CTC Outlets 763-2071

Daily Classif ieds Bring
Results--Phone 764-0557

November2s-1983
curtain 8pm Sat. 2 pm
Michigan Theater
tiCkets 662-7282
STUDENT SPECIAL DISCOUNT $1.00 ON ALL TICKETS

UANN ARBOR

All Brands Importers Inc . New York, Sole US. Importer C

[

Z INDIVIDUAL THEATRES
I 5th A3.e a< liberty 761.9700

J

lk

$2.00 WED. SAT. SUN. SHOWS BEFORE 6 PM
except "never" $3.00

"SIMMERS AND PULSATES ...
A ONE-OF-A-KIND MOVIE.
-Newsweek
"A FASCINATING GLIMPSE INTO
THE WORLD OF THE
URBAN GYPSY."
-Minneapolis Star & Tribune
LAST
7
DAYS! ", by

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