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October 25, 1983 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-10-25

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ARTS
The Michigan Daily Tuesday, October 25, 1983

PageS5

Browne out

Fami lial

fo

By David Spak
W7HAT DO YOU SAY about a guy who
forgets his lines to a song he wrote, yet
s l plays three encores to standing
oyations?
What was said by the 5,000 or so folks
who sauntered on over to Crisler Arena
Spnday night to wind down
146mecoming 1983 was that he was
alright.
$o 'ole Jackson forgot some lines
t.'ard the end of "Hold On Hold Out."
S his voice cracked on the first primal
s ream in his summer single hit
"Lawyers in Love." So he didn't seem
know where he was. So somebody
shuld tell him most of the 60s
rgicalism died here and the SDS
withered up and blew to Jane Fonda's
n k of the woods.
jo what? The crowd didn't mind and
n~ether did Jackson's band. Guitarist
Rijky Vito, who did the second scream
oi."Lawyers in Love," and drummer
Russ Kunkel anchored a solid crew that
proved to be the strength of the show.
'Vito and Kunkel began to shine on
"That Girl Could Sing." From then on
it was listen to the band and wait for
Jackson to embarass himself again.
,Vito and Pianist Craig Doerge war-
mied up "The Fuse" and "Still of the
Night" to prevent the first half of the
two hour show from tasting too much

like a warm glass of milk before bed.
And Kunkel's drumming made "For
Everyman" enjoyable for everyone.
But Jackson had his moment, taking
to the piano for "Late for the Sky" - a
well crafted number. Still, he looked
lost, maybe in Chicago or Detroit, I
don't know. He does so many shows in a
row.
His big gaff came after rousing
(Jackson Browne rousing?) renditions
of "Running on Empty" and "The
Pretender," which is perhaps his best
effort on any of his seven albums. He
got to "Hold on Hold Out" and, as he
said, "Sometimes you get stuck." After
mumbling a few more lines and letting
Kunkel hit the things drummers hit and
watching bassist Bob Glaub's head
bounce around like something on a
dashboard of a car, Jackson finally
admitted it.
"Kinda stupid, isn't it?"
Especially because it was the last
number before the encores.
Ah, but what encores they were. A
sampling of Jackson Browne from old
old to old to current all done up fresh
and new; like it took him two hours to
wake up.
Jackson and his band all clicked on
the old ("Load Out/Stay"), the current
("For a Rocker"), and the old old
("Doctor My Eyes").
Sometimes you get stuck, sometimes
you don't.

By Deborah Robinson
P LEASE MR. REAGAN, send a
cruise missile to Peggy Seeger. She.
lives in a wee village in England, and
it's too small to be an official target for
any one of the thousands of missiles
aimed at bigger cities and towns.
"Please Mr. Reagan," Seeger sang at
the Ark Sunday night, "Please send me
two; I'll point one at Thatcher and the
other at you."
Seeger, who appeared with her
husband Ewan MacColl and their two
sons, said that living in England has the
feeling of being on the "front line" of
potential nuclear disaster. She sings
songs which she hopes will help
Americans to understand that feeling.
But the Seeger and MacColl show was
far from a ram-politics-down-the-throat
session. Seeger sang several feminist
songs, including her original "I'm Gon-
na Be An Engineer." MacColl as well
performed some of his own com-
positions. What made the concert ex-
citing was the combination of the
singer/songwriters' topical material
with their vast repertoires of
traditional music.
Seeger, sibling of Mike and Pete
Seeger, has been in England for 25
years. But she continues to perform the
American songs and ballads she was
raised on with charming flavor.
Ewan MacColl is a major collector of
English and Scottish songs. He admit-
ted his voice was "a bit croaky," but

delivered his ballads with great force
despite the hoarseness.
Neill and Calum MacColl, 25 and 21
years old, were on tour in America with
their parents for the first time. Accor-
ding to Seeger, it will probably be the
last. Sigh. Both have rock groups that
"are about to be discovered," and are
too busy to sing with the old folks much.
Such a shame for American audiences.
The family sat on stage peacefully
together, often all with closed eyes as
they sang, played, or listened to each
other. They seemed to enjoy being
together and to appreciate each other.
The "transatlantic" kids did well by
both parents. Neill accompanied
Seeger on several tunes with respec-
table blues guitar playing. Calurp
played a number of instruments, iq-
cluding the Appalachian dulcimer ano
bowed psaltery.
Calum's talent shone particularly
brightly in singing a duet with his
father. Though barely audible when
doing backup vocals on choruses, his
voice bellowed powerfully beside
Ewan's. Two voices so similar, one old
and one young, made a rare and
pleasing pair.

Daily Photo by JEFF SCHRIER
Jackson Browne wasn't always on his toes Sunday night at Crisler Arena.

The Tubes issue slimy s

By Joe Hoppe
T HERE WAS ONLY one true
shining moment for the Tubes Saturday
at Hill Auditorium. Just one where
there should have been many. And then
it, the best thing, the thing of the whole
concert, was just a prop, a small small
part of a big show filled with boring
music, many other props, wonderful
gymnastics (well, I guess they were
good, too), and Tubesgirls that in their
every move fulfilled every boy's junior-
high sex fantasy.
The one great part was a wig worn by
Tubester singer Fee Waybill, who at the
time was singing (again) musically
boring "Tip of My Tongue." There it
was, topping off a pink-pinstriped black
zoot suit, this great swooping black
D.A. 'doo, huge, and then, with closer
examination (the music not meriting
full attention), one discovers the bigwig
hairpiece to be a slathering,
suggestively pointed Tongue. Such a
clever prop. It truly stood out.
Meanwhile, onsa raised platform at
the back of the stage, The Tubesgirls
(only two, not the big chorus we had all
hoped for) played warty phallic sof-
tsculpture saxophones; pink tongues
waving from the bells to go along with
the general motif. If you haven't
guessed by now, it was the props and
not the music that made the Tubes
Show '83.
Speaking of props, we have the
Tubesgirls. Yes, they are human
beings, but you probably wouldn't think
so after the performance. No one
treated them like they were. The
Tubesgirls wore many different scanty
costumes, danced, and one even got to
sing. Sometimes they were "Sushi
Girl" octopussies and mermaids,
others they were cheerleaders - there
to submit to Waybill's every whim in
their positioning so as to spell out
T*U*B*E*S - another time they were
"Wild Women of Wongo," personifying
the only good song on the Tubes latest
album. But mainly they were just little
t's and a's to be picked up and rubbed
across Fee's studded leather jockstrap
crotch. So say sexism, but the Tubes

ludge
wouldn't probably see it that way; for
Waybill flashes as much -flesh as the
women do, and acts as dumb, too.
Then there was Mr. Hate, a character
belonging to a song by the same name.
He was a truly loathsome creature.
even more so for his too-realistic
mauling and pseudo-rape of Tubesgirl
number two (the redhead). After being
shot and splashing some bloodbags,
reincarnated Fee/Mr. Hate shows that
he was right all along; "Oooh baby, you
know you want it." Bad taste is won-
derful, but some things taste too bad.
Imagine Alice Cooper performing with
real corpses for a song like "I Love the
Dead."
There was lots of other neat stuff in
the stage show too, but the band never
really rocked. The music sounded so
much the same that by the time the
band gave into everyone's screamings
with "White Punks on Dope" (which
someone shelling out $11.50 for a Tubes
show should at least know by radio
play) no one recognized the intro, ver-
se, or anything until Fee actually said
it; "We're White Punks on dope." All
the riffs sound the same.
In spite of all the stageshow, all the
skin, you can't have a rock concert
without rock and roll. Something was
missing. The Tubes might as well have
stayed old-looking and business suited
as they were for the opening song. At
least then they wouldn't have been put-
ting on anv airs.

A project of LSA Student Government
Free University Lectures on Social Change
TODAY
Economics Professor Tom Weisskopf on
"AN ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR THE LEFT"
Tuesday, October 25th - 4 P.M.
CANTERBURY LOFT
332 S. STATE, SECOND FLOOR
Upcoming lectures: November 1st, Frithjof Bergmann on "The
Future of Work." November 8th, Ann Larimore on "Thinking
About Decentralization." November 15th, Mark Chesler on "The
University,"
LAW SCHOOL CONVERSATIONS
WITH
Allan Stiliwagon
U-M Law School Admissions Dean
SMALL GROUP DISCUSSIONS ON PREPARATION FOR LAW SCHOOL
LAW SCHOOL EXPECTATIONS AND HOW ADMISSIONS DECISIONS ARE MADE
TIME: 9 to 12 AND 1:30 to 4:30
(HOURLY DISCUSSIONS AT: 9, 10, 1 1 A.M. AND 1:30, 2:30, 3:30 P.M.)
PLACE: 312 HUTCHINS HALL
(LAW SCHOOL ADMISSIONS OFFICE)
DATES: OCTOBER 25, TUESDAY
OR
NOVEMBER 15, TUESDAY
OR
DECEMBER 7, WEDNESDAY
OR
JANUARY 11, WEDNESDAY
INTERESTED STUDENTS PLEASE SIGN UP FOR A TIME AND DATE.
SIGN UP LIST AVAILABLE IN 312 HUTCHINS HALL OR TELEPHONE 764-0537
Sponsored by:THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN LAW SCHOOL AND
PRE-PROFESSIONAL SERVICES OF CP&P

I,

Photo by DAN HABIB
Fee Waybill and the rest of the The Tubes did not distinguish themselves as a
class act Saturday night in Hill Auditorium.

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