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October 21, 1983 - Image 17

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-10-21
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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Korean
cook-off
Kana's Family Restaurant
1 133 E. Huron
Hours: Monday-Saturday,
10 a.m.-9:30 p.m.
By Steven Susser
F ORSAKING soggy hamburgers,
expensive lamb sandwiches, and
tedious cafeteria lines, I ventured to
Kana Family Restaurant, a Korean
kitchen filled with Asian specialties.
I had always been intrigued by the

steadfastness of this ethnic island -
flanked by beer depots, pizza parlors
and whizzing automobiles, it constantly
challenged me to ignore more philistine
endeavors and enter. Perhaps I was
dissuaded by the somewhat dingy ex-
terior (a problem which has been
remedied), or perhaps a simple anxiety
about the unknown.
When I finally accepted the
challenge, I saw a quaint but unin-
spiring interior and a noticeable lack of
people. Actually; at 11:30 a.m., I was
the only customer. After being allowed
to choose my own seat, I was left with a
menu.
The standard fare includes dishes
such as Sung Sun Chun (sauteed ocean
perch in egg batter), Kana Special
Salad (cucumbers, bean sprouts, and
spinach, all parboiled and marinated in
Korean seasonings), and Chap Tang
(shrimp, perch, squid, fish cake, rice

cake and vegetables served with
Korean vermicelli noodles and hot
sauce). This is, of course, only a small
sample of the many beguiling dishes of-
fered.
I finally decided on a cold soup
(tomato, apple, watermelon, onion,
carrot, cucumber, sea food), Bi Bim
Bap (no, not a '50s song but beef
spinach and vegetables over rice), and
Kim-Chee (a spicy cabbage dish).
The charming owner took my order
and asked me if it was my first visit.
When I said no, she welcomed me, war-
ned me about the spicy hot Kim Chee,
and departed.
Only 10 minutes later, a meal arrive-L
at my table that would have dethroned
Burger King or sent Olga into a shamed
retreat.
The soup was a delightful and
refreshing mixture of sweet fruit and
tangy broth; the Kim-Chee was very

hot, but for those spirited souls, a
visceral treat. The entree which was
served in a large metal bowl, contained
beef and vegetables on top of rice and
under a fried egg. Everything is served
fresh and delicious. To finish the ex-
perience, I was given a complimentary
cup of ginger tea.
My last treat was the surprisingly
reasonable bill. I paid under six dollars
for an appetizer, soup, entree and
drink. If I had ordered only the beef
dish, I would have paid only $3.60. This
is quite reasonable since all the por-
tions are very large. In addition, there
is a ten percent student discount, (ex-
cept for weekdays between noon and-1
p.m.).
Give your palate a treat, eat inexpen-
sively and experience a different
culture at the Kana Family Restaurant.
It is worth it, if only to avoid the golden
arches for a single day. [2
-ie

S rt-un
ANGELO, MY LOVE
Robert Duvall makes his directing debut with this
screenplay he authored about a young Gypsy boy
who is street-smart, yet lovable. (Ann Arbor
Theater, 210 S. Fifth; 761-9700)
BEYOND. THE LIMITS
Richard Gere and Michael Caine star in a political
thriller set in a seedy South American province.
(Movies at Briarwood, Briarwood Mall; 769-8780)
THE BIG CHILL,.
Seven University alumni gather together at the
funeral of a friend, the results being humorous and
touching. Are these the best years of our lives?
(Movies at Briarwood, Briarwood Mall; 769-8780) f
BRAINSTORM
Natalie Wood's last film finally makes it to the
screen, thanks to much lobbying on the part of direc-
tor Douglas Trumbull. The sci-fi thriller also stars
Christopher Walken and Cliff Robertson. (Fox-
Village Theater, Maple Village; 769-1300)

,

l

THE DEAD ZONE
Stephen King's newest story deals with the psychic
powers of a man who awakens from a coma after five
long years. (State Theater, 231S. State; 662-6264)
THE DOORS
Get a glimpse of Jim Morrison in his heyday as
leader of the now-closed Doors. Rare concert footage
makes this one interesting. (State Theater, 231 S.
State; 662-6264)
FLASH DANCE
Oh what a feeling! Jennifer Beals dances (well,
almost) the night away. (Fox Village Theater, Maple
Village; 769-1300).
MR. MOM
A tired attempt at a tired theme. Mr. Mom looks at
role reversal with all the charm of a wet liver. (The
Fox Village Theater, Maple Village; 769-1300).
NEVER SAY NEVER AGAIN
What an apt title for Sean (I'll never do another
Bond movie") Connery. To some he is the only 007,
to others he's just an old man out to make a buck.

{

Either way, he's back and he's Bond. (Ann Arbor
Theater,210 St.,Fifth; 7619701).
RETURN OF THE JEDI
George Lucas clues us in on those troubling
questions raised in the two prior Star Wars hits. Lots
more action in this one, with a little less character
development-except for Luke and Darth. The
magic is still there. (Campus Theater, 1214 S.
University; 668-6416).
THE RIGHT STUFF
No, it's not .ohn Glenn's campaign office that is
pushing this film so diligently-but Glenn sure will
benefit by its success. He comes off looking pretty
good in the film adaptation of the novel that tells the
inside story of the NASA space program. (Movies at
Briarwood, Briarwood Mall; 769-8780)
RISKY BUSINESS
A dozen pubescent high-school hormonalites learn
about love, life, college interviews and prostitution.
(Movies at Briarwood, Briarwood Mall; 769-8780).
ROMANTIC COMEDY
Broadway comes to the screen once again as
Dudley Moore and Mary Steenburgen star in what
Moore uniquely termed "a comedy avec romance."
(Movies at Briarwood, Briarwood Mall; 769-8780)

TRADING
Dan Akro
turns out a
Live. (F
1300).
UNDER F1
A photoj
conflict be
begins to lo.
Theater, 23
VACATION
Chevy Ch
treat hims
(WaysideT
ZELIG
Has Wo
count on it.
twist in pse
State; 662-

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............. ..... ............ ..........

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idmou

................... . ........ . . ......... . . . ........,..:,................................. .......... ... .... **...* . . ~ *.*~*

CCc
CATERERS
Let us arrange your parties
at our place or yours.
We have new extended menus
and exciting foods
to take out.
Come lunch with us in our
restored Victorian mansion
at 326 W. Liberty,
Tuesday through Saturday,
11:30-2.
Reservations
663-3278
Tote cuisine pantry . .
Kerr ytown I
1 41
ii
~ vjiiu . JIL

The finer side

B OASTING THE TRADEMARK of "panache par
excellence," Ann Arbor's culinary elite has ear-
ned its outstanding reputation. Founded on excep-
tional food, service,-and ambience, the culinary elite
deserves the upper echelon in the world of dining.
Ann Arbor, a city of variety, maintains a diverse
range of culinary stars. Characterized in every in-
ternational flavor, cuisine's "finer side" occupies
many sides, from continental to oriental. The menus

appear as billboards of delicacies and rare treats to
surpass palatial expectations.
Outstanding service and refined atmosphere add
the finishing touches and the culinary elite turn
meals into enjoyable events. Whether celebrating a
special occasion or indulging in an unusual treat, fine
restaurants separate the world of dining from the
everyday meal- and patrons become kings and
queens for the duration of each gastronomic ex-
perience.
-Julie Winokur

SMALL CHANGE (Francois Truffaut, 1976)
Truffaut objectively looks at the world of children
in a French village, observing both the good and the
bad. French with subtitles. (Mediatrics; Nat. Sci.
Aud, 7:00, 9:00)
MR BLANDINGS BUILDS HIS1DREAM HOUSE (H.
C. Potter, 1948)
Cary Grant and Myrna Loy decide to forsake their
urban existence and head out to the Connecticut
countryside. Sad to say, they discover the univer-
sality of Murphy's law. Also starring Melvyn
Douglas. (Cinema 2; Aud. A., 7:00)
BRINGING UP BABY (Howard Hawks, 1938)
Cary Grant is once again in the Connecticut coun-
tryside. This time, he's a palaentologist about to get
married who wishes he hadn't met Katherine Hep-
burn and her pet leopard. (Cinema 2; Aud. A, 8:45)
FAME (Alan Parker, 1981)
It can geta little difficult at times believing that
the people at the New York High School for the Per-
forming Arts are this talented, but watching them go
at it in this Oscar winner for Best Musical Score
proves that they arethat talented. (Alternative Ac-
tion; MLB 4,7:00,9:15)
THE KING OF COMEDY (Martin Scorcese,1983)
Jerry Lewis is a Johnny Carson-like talk show host
who gets bothered by fan Robert DeNiro who coin-
cidentaly wants to be on the show. Plenty amusing,
but always a nagging feeling that it should have been
even funnier. (Ann Arbor Film Coop; MLB 3, 7:00,
9:00)
LOVE AND DEATH (Woody Allen, 1975)
Diane Keaton and Allen star in a hilarious satirical
romp through Russia in Napoleon's time. Chief
targets are love, death, and Russia's great writers.
Definitely should be seen. (Classic Film Theater;
Michigan Theater, 7:00,10:30)
START THE REVOLUTION WITHOUT ME (Bud
Yorkin,1970)
An unusual pairing of Gene Wilder and Donald
Sutherland, as each of them plays a set of twins who
run into each other at the court of Louis XVI. Yes, it
is a eomedy. (Classic Film Theater; Michigan
Theater, 8:40)
DR. STRANGELOVE (Stanley Kubrick, 1964)
Kubrick puts his great talents to work in a black
comedy about the nuclear bomb that's as relevant
now as it was 20 years ago. Peter Sellers does such a
splendid job in his three parts that you don't even
know its the same person playing them. (Cinema
Guild:7:00.9:00)

SMITHEREENS (Susan Seidelman,1982)
The second film getting its Ann Arbor premiere
tonight is about a woman who goes to New York and
becomes a punk rock groupie to try and drown out
the hardships of life. (Cinema 2; Aud A, 7:00, 8:40,
10:20)
GUMBY SHORTS (Art Clokey, 1950's)
The famous clay figure and. his horse Pokey ap-
pear in some of their best work. A nostalgic evening
for just about anyone. This is the actual animated
version-not the Eddie Murphy one. (Ann Arbor
FilnmCoop; MLB 3,7:00,10:20)
ROCKY AND BULLWINKLE CARTOONS (Jay
Ward)
Some more humorous and nostalgic animations.
These are the ones which provided the anthem that
some people would like the University's new fight
song to be. (Ann Arobr Film Coop; MLB 3,8:40)
LOVE AND DEATH (Woody Allen, 1975)
See Friday's listing. (Classic Film Theater;
Michigan Theater, 7:00.10:30)
START THE REVOLUTION WITHOUT ME (Bud
Yorkin,1970)
See Friday's listing. (Classic Film Theater;
Michigan Theater, 8:40)
NIGHT OF THE IGUANA (John Huston, 1964)
After Richard Burton leaves the clergy, he
becomes a tour guide in Mexico, where he becomes
involved with Sue Lyon, Deborah Kerr, and Ava
Gardner. From the Tennessee Williams play.
(Alternative Action; Nat. Sci. Aud.,7:30)
CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF (Richard Brooks, 1958)
Elizabeth Taylor plays Maggie the Cat in what
many film historians regard as her best performan-
ce. Maggie is the tortured wife of Brick (Paul
Newman), an alchoholic who is no longer satisfied by
his wife or any other woman for that matter. A bold
adaptation of the Tennessee Williams play for 1958.
(Alternative Action, Nat. Sci., 9:45)
FAME (Alan Parker, 1980)
See Friday's listing-but watch out, this one is
presented by a different group. (Hill St. Cinema;
1429 Hill St., 8:00, 10:15)
ON A CLEAR DAY YOU CAN SEE FOREVER (Vin-
cente Minnelli, 1970)
Barbra Streisand, schizophrenic, visits her
psychology professor. He hypnotizes her and
discovers a bevy of hidden personalities.
(Mediatrics; MLB 4,7:00)
WHAT'S UP DOC? (Peter Bogdonovich, 1972)
Streisand goes chasing after Ryan O'Neal, a
musicologist who would much rather gaze at his
rocks. The more he tries to elude her the less he suc-
ceeds in this '30s-style comedy. (Mediatrics; MLB 4,
9:15)

(Classic Film Theater; Michigan Theater, 6:30,
9:00)
OPERATION THUNDERBOLT (Menachem Golan,
1978)
An authentic dramatization of Israel's rescue of
hijacked airline passengers being held at Entebbe.
Hebrew with subtitles. (Hill Street Cinema; 1429
Hill, 7:00, 9:00)
DEATH BY HANGING (Nagisa Oshima, 1968)
An interesting thesis lies at the heart of this film. If
a man is hanged for crimes but fails to die, and
becomes amnesiac in the process, is he the same
man, and can be be hanged again? Japanese with
subtitles. (Cinema 2; Aud. A, 7:00, 9:05)
THE BARRETTS OF WIMPOLE STREET (Sidney
Frankline, 1934)
Charles Laughton plays the father of a problem-
filled family, the oldest child being encouraged to
fight dad by her secret suitor. (Cinema Guild; Lorch
Hall, 7:00)
REMBRANDT (Alexander Korda, 1936)
An evening of Charles Laughton concludes as the
actor plays the famous Dutch painter. (Cinema
Guild; Lorch Hall, 9:00)

MIDEAST: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (1977)
A film that explores the effects of oil and money on
today's world events. (Cinema Guild; Lorch Hall,
7:00, FREE)
FACTORIES FOR THE THIRD WORLD (Gordian
Troeller, 1979)
Tunisia serves as a case study for the effects of
foreign investment money on third world nations.
(Cinema Guild; Lorch Hall, 7:00, FREE)
THE DAY AFTER TRINITY
Robert Oppenheimer's career is the angle used as
this film looks at the development of the first three
atomic bombs, using many interviews of Manhattan
Project members as source material. (Alternative
Action; Room 126- East Quad, 8:00, FREE)

O LUCKY h
Malcolm
goes on an
ladder wit
wisdom a
Michigan'T
THX 1138 (
Robert D
too-distant-
ved as a w
Street Cine.

THE TAL
(Yves Rol
A Fren
violinist, b
trimming
Theater,
COUISIN
Gentle
become r
love, givi
(Classic I
THE STU
Peter 0
Hollywood
stitute st
plans on I
audience
Guild; Lor
V'-

04~K-
A \ 110
o "~;
o

Congenial Atmosphere
where students and faculty can mingle and
T E meet. Fine luncheons and buffets at the
H_ _ _most reasonable prices in the campus area.

DICK TRACY (William Witney and John English,
1941)
If the title is any indication,-the Ghost has put
Tracy in a lot of trouble. The title "Beheaded,"
episode number 9. (Cinema Guild; Lorch Hall, 6:30,
50t)
THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME (William
Dieterlo, 1939)
Charles Laughton is Quasimodo, famed bellringer
of the famed cathedral in an age of turmoil in Fran-
ce. Still entertaining, though the themes are a little
overstated. (Cinema Guild; Lorch Hall, 7:00, 9:05)

UNIVERSITY

BUFFETS
Mnn Snnlnd Bar

Thu rsc-Dl

SHAME (Ingmar Bergman, 1968)
Bergman's usual entourage of Max von Sydow and
Liv Ullman star in a tale of a couple trying to escape
the ravages of war in no particular time, adding to
the film's universality. (Ann Arbor Film Coop; MLB
4,7:00)
COUPDE GRACE (Volker Schlondorff,1977)
A young officer and his friends, all back in their
village after World War I, serve as a microcosm of
Germany as a whole in their frustrations and bitter-
ness. (Ann Arbor Film Coop; MLB 4,8:45)
THE MAGIC FLUTE (Ingmar Bergman, 1974)
Bergman adapts Mozart's opera about two lovers
and a man in search of one. Swedish with subtitles.
(Classic Film Theater; Michigan Theater, 6:30,
9:00)
OPERATION THUNDERBOLT (Ingmar Bergman,
1974)
Bergman adapts Mozart's opera about two lovers
and a man in search of one. Swedish with subtitles.

.II,,U.JUIU OSI ,. -. .
Tues.-Taco Bar Fri.-Hot Dogs
Wed.-Potato Skins
(Many Varieties)
All Buffets All You Can Eat!

rr

FITZCARRALDO (Werner Herzog, 1982)
Finally, the Ann Arbor premiere of Herzog's
Amazon adventure that got a lot of publicity because
of Herzog's slight over-dedication to the cause of
realism while making the film. Klaus Kinski stars.
German with subtitles. (Cinema Guild; Lorch Hall,
6:30, 9:15)

IF... (Lindsay Anderson, 1969)
Malcolm McDowell (later of A Clockwork Orange
fame) made his screen debut as a teacher in a
rather repressive private school where the students
react by plotting a revolution. (Classic Film
Theater; Michigan Theater, 7:00)

DeNi

8..Weekend/Octoher-21-1983

5

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