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October 21, 1983 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-10-21

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, October 21, 1983 -Page 5

German students cut
school to protest arms

From AP and UPI
BONN, West Germany - Thousands
of students; and teachers skipped
classes and took to the streets yester-
day to demand that NATO cancel
deployment of new nuclear missiles in
Europe.
The protests in West German schools
and universities came on "school
resistance day," the eighth day of a 10-
day campaign against NATO's plan to
base 572 medium-range U.S. nuclear
missiles in western Europe, unless
agreement is reached at U.S.-Soviet
arms talks in Geneva.
UNDER THE plan, beginning in
E December, 108 Pershing-2 missiles and
96 cruise milliles will be stationed in
West Germany.
Peace movement organizers claimed
more than 70,000 teachers and pupils
across the country cut classes, held
workshops and protested. Police
estimates were lower.
In Bonn, however, Defense Minister
Manfred Woerner warned the peace
movement that the Soviet Union
represented the real threat to Germans
because it had designs on all of Western
Europe.
YESTERDAY'S biggest demon-
stration took place in West Berlin,
where organizer spokesman Norbert
Rugalski said 20,000 students left class
to form human chains around the
school buildings and march through the
streets.
An estimated 50,000 demonstrators
participated in yesterday's protests
AP Photo and West Germany's anti-nuclear
erday to movement claimed the turnout swelled
ugh the the number of marchers to more than 1
otesting million for the week.
But Bonn government sources said
the figure for the week was nearer to
100,000. "They have counted each per-
son 10 times," one spokesman said.

A HIGHLY-placed western
diplomatic source said the protests
have been smaller and tamer than
authorities had expected.
"I am impressed by how calm this so-
called action week has been. We for
months have been preparing for the
very worst, people hurling themselves
against fences and the like," said the
source, who spoke on the condition that
he not be identified.
The only violence reported was in the
northern port city of Bremen, where
police said more than 6,000 teachers
and pupils carrying banners reading
"no battlefield in Germany" and "after
rearmament comes war" ended classes
two hours early to attend a march in the
city center.
Police said three people were
arrested after 150 masked and
helmeted "troublemakers" joined the
peaceful protest,smasheddheadlights
on two police cars and damaged a
civilian vehicle. Officers moved in and
broke up the group.
At a news conference in Bonn, the
missile opponents maintained that the
demonstrations this week are "just the
beginning" of protests that will con-
tinue through the planned NATO
deployment of U.S. nuclear missiles
here in December. In all, 572 missiles
are to be deployed in Western Europe,
204 of them in West Germany.'

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Nearly 20,000 students in West Berlin, Germany left classes yest
form human chains around local school buildings and march thro
streets. 'Schools and universities throughout Germany are pr
NATO's planned deployment of nuclear missiles in Europe.

Restricted
Army jobs
reopened
"to women
WASHINGTON (AP) - Prodded by
women's groups, the Army yesterday
reopened 13 of 23 military specialties it
had closed to female enlistees on the
ground that they risked involvement in
direct dombat.
Lt. Gen. Robert Elton, the Army's
personnel chief, acknowledged at a
news conference that the action was
"driven by a number of concerned
groups," including an advisory panel
which had protested to. Defense
Secretary Caspar Weinberger.
THAT PANEL, the Defense Advisory
Committee on Women in the Services,
issued a statement saying ''we applaud
tie substantial changes that have been
made."
The categories reopened to women
include such jobs as repairing missile
radar and fire control systems,
operating heavy construction equip-
ment, and decontamination specialists
in nuclear, biological and chemical
warfare.
But Elton stressed that the Army was
sticking to its policy, established by the
Defense Department, that women will
continue to be barred from serving in
combat units suchas infantry, artillery
and armor.
AT THE SAME time, however, the
rArmy announced that it plans to in-
crease the number of enlisted women
from the present 66,300 to 72,700 and
the number of women officers from the
present 9,300 to 10,600 by 1987.
Sexual
harassnient
charges
force prof
to resign
(Continued from Page 1)
subcommittee's recommendation.
Shapiro said that after reviewing the
case, he decided to recommend that the
regents fire the professor for miscon-
duct.
But the professor submitted his

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