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October 20, 1983 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-10-20

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, October 20, 1983 - Page 5
Reagan to continue aid
to Lebanon; troops to stay

Bicyclist rescued
Dennis Harris, a Museum of Zoology Technician, was struck by a car while riding his bike at E. Washington and S. State
streets at 5:49 p.m. Tuesday. Simone Press, the 40 year old driver of the car, said that she did not see Harris, and hit him
as she was turning from Washington to State. Harris was taken to University Hospital with incapacitating injuries.
Press was not injured.

WASHINGTON (AP) - President
Reagan said last night that American
forces will remain in Lebanon as long
as there's a chance that peace can be
restored there and he intends to do
everything he can "to persuade Syria to
quit being a roadblock in this process."
The president said great progress has
been made since he dispatched 1,600
Marines as peacekeepers to the
Mideast nearly a year ago. Reagan
pointed to Israel's partial withdrawal,
the election of a Lebanese government,
and the "successful ousting of 10,000
PLO militia" as examples of progress
in the region.
LOOKING BACK over his first 1,000
days in office, Reagan said yesterday
that. he was proud of the nation's
economic progress even if the changes
have "tested our mettle, our patience
and our unity."
"We've made great strides in these
first 1,000 days," Reagan said in an
opening statement at his nationally
televised news conference. The
Republican incumbent spoke of
progress in reducing inflation and in-
terest rates and said the economy now
was making a strong recovery. And he
said he would not take all the blame for
soaring federal deficits.
"We should remember that these
deficits didn't just spring up in 1,000
days," he said. "They are the products
of too many years of 'tax and tax and
spend and spend,"' using a favorite
phrase for the years of Democratic con-
trol the White House and Congress. The
WOMEN'S LIVES
Conversations on how women
grow and change
SPEAKER
ANN MARIE COLEMAN
Clergywomon
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21
12 Noon
GUILD HOUSE
802 MONROE
Lunch is available at $1

1,000th day of the Reagan ad-
ministration was Monday.
"THIS WEEK we marked an an-
niversary here in Washington, the
1,000th day since we charted a new
course for America . . . From the out-
set, we knew breaking with the past ...
would be long and hard and it has
been," he said.
Fielding questions at his first news con-
ference in nearly three months, Reagan
said he would sign a bill, which cleared
the Senate 78-22 earlier in the day, to

Senate passes King

make a legal federal holiday honoring
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the civil
rights leader assassinated on April 4,
1968. King would be the first American
so honored since George Washington.
The president said he would have
preferred something less than a full-
fledged holiday, but he recognized
King's symbolic importance to the
black community.
"Since they seem bent on making it a
national holiday . . . I will sign that
legisltaion," Reagan said.

Continued from Page 1)
hero of all time deserves some con-
sideration," Helms said during the final
hours of debate in urging a holiday to
observe the April 13 birthday of
Thomas Jefferson.
On Dec. 1, 1955, Mrs. Rosa Parks, a
seamstress,, got on the bus, and, in
violation of the social norms of Mon-
tgomery, Ala., refused to take a back
seat when a white person wanted her
seat.

Parks' arrest led to a 382 boycott of
the city's buses by blacks, led by the
pastor of the Dexter Avenue Baptist
Church, Martin Luther King Jr.
When the boycott ended, King's name
was known in black homes across the
South.
After the Montgomery bus boycott,
King led sit-in protests at lunch coun-
ters, theaters, department stores,
colleges and libraries, against the
South's racial segregation. In 1957, he

oliday bill
traveled 780,000 miled and made 208
speeches.
In 1964, his philosophy won him the
Nobel Peace Prize at age 35. And in
1965, he turned against the Vietnam
War for draining resources from the
poor.
He was planning a "Poor Peoples
March" on Washington for 1968 when on
April 4, he was shot and killed as he
stood on the balcony of the Lorraine
Motel in Memphis, Tenn.

You're Needed
All Over the,
World.
Ask Peace Corps volunteers why their ingenuity and flexibility
are as vital as their degrees. They'll tell you they are helping
the world's poorest peoples attain self sufficiency in the areos
of food production, energy conservation, education, economic
development and health services. And they'll tell you about
the rewards of hands on career experience overseas. They'll
tell you it's the toughest job you'll ever*love.
INTERVIEWS THIS WEEK!
All majors considered
for 1984 SPRING and
SUMMER openings.
Contact the Placement
- Office. For more info
call 1-226-7928 or 764-9310
PEACE CORPS

*Office costs take bite out of Hopwoods

(Continued from Page 1)
added, that a new typesetting system
more than doubled the printing costs of
the Hopwood bulletin, a publication
which explains the rules and history of
the awards and a list of past judges,
speakers, and winners.
"REALLY, IT'S very upsetting the
way costs have risen," she said.
According to Prof. John Aldridge, the
Hopwood committee chairman, the
committee really can't do much about
its speaker fees if it wants to keep at-
tracting writers like Joan Didion and
Stephen Spender.
"The fees we pay to speakers are for
the most part below what they would
get elsewhere," Aldridge said. One
:reason novelist Norman Mailer accep-
ted the offer to present the awards at
next yeAr's ceremony is because
'we've been friends for years,"
Aldridge said.
ALDRIDGE ALSO said the money
paid to contest judges is modest at
best. The entries are first screened by
University professors who rank the top
20 and sent the top 6 or 8 on to national
judges. The national judges rank those
entries, attach their commentary and
the Committee on Hopewood Awards
sets award amounts.
That process takes about $7,350, or 13
percent of the money available to the
committee. "It's not generous on our
part," Aldridge said. "We had a couple
of judges who wrote us an indignant let-
ter saying it's insulting to ask us to do
this without some (higher) fee."
After the letter, the committee in-
creased their payment by about $200.
They now pay $400 for essay and drama
judges, and $500 for poetry, short story
and fiction judges.
THE UNIVERSITY professors who
screen the entries earn $150 to $200 for
their two weeks work.
Although Hopwood's will does not

mention anything about paying the
national judges and speakers, many in-
volved in the program say the awards
would be stripped of their glamour if
writers like Lillian Hellman and Joyce
Carol Oates weren't deciding what is
best at the University of Michigan.
"This sounds elitist, but it does make
you feel like you're in a certain
league," said Suzanne Burr, graduate
student in English who won a fiction
award last April.
IF MAXINE HONG Kingston hadn't:
come last year and there had been
more money for awards, in a way it
would have been better, but it would
lose some of its excitement and
meaning," she said.

Sandra Steingraber, who won a
poetry prize in April, said the chance to
be judged by two of her favorite poets -
William Stafford and Denise Levertov -
helps keep the contest from becoming
"provincial" and is worth the fee.
"God, there's just so much money
around . . . I don't think anyone feels
they're being cheated out of money,"
said Steingraber, a graduate student in
biology.
WHAT DOES bother Steingraber is
that a student must take a composition
class in order to enter the contest.
"I think it's stupid to have to take a
composition coarse to get in, especially
if you don't win it one year and want to
enter again," she said.

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GENERAL ALEXANDER
HAIGL
WILL SPEAK ON
'A Perspective on
American Foreign Policy"
- TONIGHT -

S.60290
A tribute to Spain! Sonically explo-
sive pieces indiginous to the emotion-
ally charged country and its people.
The disc pulsates with rhythmic tire
and color . .. engineers having cap-
tured the ultimate in spectacular
sound. Eleven tracks - every one a
knockout!
STRAUSS: DON QUIXOTE
DRESDEN STATE ORCHESTRA
KEMPE TORTELIER
S-60363
RICHARD STRAUSS'S lone poems, in
the virtuoso performances of RUDOLF
KEMPE and the Dresden State Or-
chestra, continue to appear on Sera-
phim: here DON QUIXOTE with cello
soloist PAUL TORTELIER.
BEETHOVEN: CONCERTO
NO. 5 IN E FLAT ("EMPEROR")
Phiharmonia Orchestra

HAYDN: THE SIX
FLUTE QUARTETS OP. 5
RAMPAL
Trio a Cordes Francais
S-60327
Rampal has long been recognized as
"the master of his instrument." This
set of performances (once on Angel)
documents the flutist's early virtuosity
- his artistry brims with every bit of
the gracefulness and elegance we
know today. Indeed, a Seraphim al-
bum of the highest order!
DEBUSSY
La Mer-Three Nocturnes
BARSIROWL
ORCHESTRE DELPARIS
S-60360
DEBUSSY's impressionist tone poems
LA MER and THREE NOCTURNES
shine in the lush performances of the
late SIR JOHN BARBIROLLI, conduct-
ing the Orchestre de Paris.

CHOPIN:
THE FOUR BALLADES
THE THREE IMPROMPTUS
Fantaisie impromptu in C sharp minor
ANIE VAS
S-60336
Handsomely performed new record-
ings by one of today's finest young
pianists. As here in the Chopin reper-
toire, Anievas excels, his romantic
warmth and technical mastery are
finely molded. He imbues the music
with the superior artistry he holds at
his fingertips.
LEINSDORF
conducts
WAGNER
RICHARD STRAUSS
LOS ANGELES PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA
S-60344
ERICH LEINSDORF conducts the Los
Angeles Philharmonic in WAGNER
and RICHARD -STRAUSS: the Prel-
ude and Liebestod from "Tristan and
Isolde" and the great tone poem
"Death and Transfiguration."

RUSSIAN
ORCHESTRAL
MASTERPIECES
Caprccio Espagnol Night On Bald
Mountain" Polovtsian Dances. In the
Steppes of Central Asia
GEORGES
PRETRE
WRoyal Phiharmonic
S-60372
RUSSIANORCHESTRALMASTERPIECES
by GEORGES PRETRE and the Royal

SHOSTAKOVICH
SYMPHONY No. 1
PROKOFIEV
"CLASSICAL" SYMPHONY
Phiiharmonia Orchestra
KURTZ
S-60330
1 + 1 = 2. Two first -a pair of sym-

60298
The English pianist, heard here at the
height of his grievously short career,

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