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October 14, 1983 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-10-14

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, October 14, 1983 - Page 7
Young people play
'David and Lisa'

By Emily Montgomery
IN THESE days of woe, when heart-
aches and depression are nearly a
way of life and "taking the bad with the
good" sometimes means taking the bad
and forgetting about the good, it's not
often when a praise for love and human
kindness can be heard. Such praise,
however, will be given tonight in the
form of a play, David and Lisa, which is
being performed by the Young People's
Theatre tonight at Community High
School.
David and Lisa, written by Theodore
Issac Rubin, was chosen especially by a
group of parents, teachers and staff
members involved in the organization,
because of the subject matter it deals
with-adolescents and the problems of
growing up. The plot centers around
two children in a school for the
emotionally disturbed. David, played
by Mark Ligeski, is a new student. He
makes friends with Lisa, played by Ann
Morton, an older student at the school.
They soon become an indomitable
combination, ready to conquer the

gravest of enemies, including their
handicaps.
The director of the play, Gregg
Henry, a third year master's candidate
at the University says that he h'as
"considerably altered the movie version
that most people are familiar with."
"The screenplay wasn't always faithful
to the book and by adding some scenes
directly from the original story and cut-
ting some from the screenplay, tli,
Y.P.T. version will more closely
resemble Rubin's original novel."
That's not the only precaution Henry
has taken to preserve authenticity,
though. He consulted a child

psychologist, who came and spoke to
the cast at rehearsals and helped with
character interpretations.
There will be a total of six perfor-
mances of the play, October 14 - 15 and
October 21 - 22. The evening perfor-
mances will be at 8 p.m. and the Satur-
day matinee will be at 2 p.m.
The auditorium at Community High
School, located at 401 N. Division, is
rather small, so seating is limited.
Those interested are advised to reserve
advanced tickets by calling 996-3888.
Ticket prices are $3. for students
and $4. for adults. Group rates are
also available.

Signing his life away
Chuck Mangione takes some time out before his concert last night at Hill auditorium to autograph some albums for
LSA freshperson Kim McIntyre (left) School of Music sophomore Debbie Suriano yesterday at Schoolkid's Records.

Ganging up for good music

By Jay Dorrance
ETROIT IS being invaded
by radical elements-the Gang of
four. With a name like "Gand of Four"
tne would expect revolutionary ideas
.and that's where the Gang's at.
The Gang debuted in late 1977 in the
latter stages of the '70s punk explosion.
The band was immediately seized upon,
as another English punk-new wave
band by the music media. The problem
is that classifications don't easily fit
this band.
Their music is non-melodic and
slashing, almost atonal at times. Led
on by the exciting, cutting guitars of
Andrew Gill, it can be powerful and
grabbing. Many, however, would say
the bands strength is the rhythm sec-
tion of Hugo Burnham (drums) and
Dave Allen (bass). This pair con-
stitutes one of the best drum-bass com-
binations in rock today.
Unfortunately, for both us and the
Gang, both of these fellas are now
missing. Dave Allen left to form
Shriekback with Barry Andrews of
kTC, and Hugo has now been
dismissed.
The band's last LP, Songs of the Free,
shows that the band can cover for the
loss of Allen. With the addition of Sara
Lie (ex-League of Gentlemen, R.
Fripp) on bass and vocals, progress
and change have been by words.
The Songs of the Free album
features their hottest single to date, 'I
Love a Man (in his uniform)." Sara
Lee's female voice and melodic bass
playing provide for new and
stimulating ideas. With Hard we see an
even more streamlined version of the
band. Hugo Burnham has been
replaced by a drum machine and ad-
ditional percussion chores by the rest of
the Gang. Hard is the logical
progression after Free with fatter
sound, stronger melodies and softer
vocals.
This is not to say the Gang has gone
soft, on the contrary, Andrew Gill's
guitar work has never sounded better
or rougher.
Gang of Four's strongest suit is their
live act. This group is hot. I've had the
pleasure of catching them twice at the
Second Chance in the winter of '81 and
last summer on their Songs of the

The Ultimate 'Za'

The World's Largest Sicilian Pizza
aB -
A Benefit for the 1983 United Way Torch Fund

FRI., OCTOBER 21. 1983
REGENTS PLAZA

$2.00 advance sales
$3.00 day of event
includes: pizza, salad,
beverage

* Michigan Union
. Ticket Office,
.CTC
* 763-1107
MOLSON
uLD

Even though they didn't all make it to this photo session, there are at least four members of this gang.
Gang of Four will all be at St. Andrew's Hall in Detroit tonight.

1-

UNIQI's

Free tour at the Michigan Theater.
The show at the Michigan was the
"new" Gang of Four. With charter
members Gill, King and Burnham sup-
plemented by the just-added Sara Lee
on bass with two female vocalists. The
changes were reminiscent of the
Talking Heads Remain in Light
period. The emphasis was on per-
cussion, with syndrums set all over the.
stage. Perhaps the axing of Burnham
can be lessened by the energy of the
show.
Hard is a hot album, one of the best

released so far this fall. As a matter of
fact, Gang of Four has yet to release a
ture "dog." Their debut album, En-
tertainment, features sparse
arrangements with Andy's fighting
dinosaur guitars. For me their biggest
letdown was Solid Gold. It would
have been OK for any other band, but
these guys are much better than that
album.
Between albums the Gang is one of

the bigwheels of the 12 inch single and
mini LP. With a catalogue of over 14
disks, only four are full long plays.
Some of their best material can be
found only on the minis.
This band saves its best for the live
gigs - when the band really burns. Even if
you've caught them before this should
be an interesting show. Change is the
Gang of Four's only constant.

Heroldg' Maude
ARE CELEBRATING THEIR 4th
YEAR FALL 464th.SHOWING!

/
6 eo O .4
4'e 0000
to tie~ig5 Ol

(FREE GIFTS WHILE THEY LAST)
His hangups are Hilarious

October 20
1983
Hill Auditorium
8:00pm
Tickets are $9.50 and
$8.50. Available at the
Michigan Union Ticket
Office and all CTC Outlets.
Call 763-2071. A Major
Events Presentation.
Some proceeds from this
concert will benefit

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232nd
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4th
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