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October 14, 1983 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-10-14

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, October 14, 1983 - Page 3

Inflation reduces salary
hikes for business grads

By ERIC MATTSON
Starting salaries for business school
graduates from the University went up
about 4 percent last year, a substan-
tially lower increase than such
positions have offered in previous
years.
According to a report released
yesterday by the placement office of
the Graduate School of Business Ad-
ministration, recent graduates also are
being more selective about which job to
accept, with 39 percent going into
positons which pay significantly less
than the highest offer would have.
THE REPORT, which did not include
graduates who were unable to find jobs,
includes figures for both bachelor's and
master's graduates.
According to placement director
Margaret Carroll, who prepared the
report, salaries had been rising bet-
ween 8 percent and 12 percent annually
at inflation's peak. She said the decline

in the inflation rate was the primary
cause of this year's low increase.
"Job content and opportunity for ad-
vancement were given as the most im-
portant factors for the selection of a
position, followed closedly by industry
of the employer and level of respon-
siblity," Carroll said in the report.
LAST YEAR, 290 firms recruited
bachelor's and master's degree studen-
ts through the school's placement of-
fice, conducting 11,141 interviews -
an average of 15 on-campus interviews
per business student.
Carroll said the school does not have
accurate figures on how many students

have not found work since graduation.
The most popular positions for-
master's degree holders last year were
with aerospace and electronics com-
panies, the automotive and transpor-
tation industry, management advisory
services in public accounting firms,
and commercial banking.
Bachelor's graduates also favored
aerospace and electronics companies
as well as food and beverage processing
firms, chemical and pharmaceutical
firms, public accounting, and commer-
cial banking.
Master's graduates accepted
positions paying from $13,200 to $44,700.
Bachelor's degree holders were given
jobs paying from $12,000 to $28,500,the
report said.

Joint Venture Daily Photos by RENEE FREIER
No, this isn't a scene from last year's hash bash. These students, from the University's "Woody Plants" botany class,
are merely examining local plant life during a field test they were taking yesterday at the Bird Hills forest off of Huron
River.
Man banned from 'U' buildings

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Michigan Daily

By MICHAEL ROLNICK
An Ann Arbor resident who says
University security officers have ban-
ned him from all University buildings is
seeking felony charges against the of-
ficers who he says threatened him.
Glen Roberts, 21, filed a complaint
Tuesday with the Ann Arbor office of
the Federal Bureau of Investigation
because of a Sept. 12 confrontation with
three University security officers who
r asked him to leave the Law Library.
ROBERTS, who is not a
student at the University, said
he had been to the library several times
before to conduct research for a legal
suit in which he is involved.
When he entered the library Sept. 12,
Roberts said he was stopped by a
guard, who asked him for student iden-
tification. When Roberts said he was
not a student but had used the library
several times before, the guard called
for two other officers.
The guards told Roberts use of the
library is restricted to law students,
lawyers, or people holding special
passes and asked him to leave. When he
protested, they) asked him for other
T ' r

'The officers treated me nicely until they
found out I didn't have a phone number.
That is when they suggested that I . . . go
hang out on the ... Diag.'
--Gle1 Roberts

Phone

764-0558

identification.
"THE OFFICERS treated me nicely
until they found out I didn't have a
phone number," Roberts said. "That is
when they suggested that I should go
hang out on the south corner of the Diag
with all the street people and vagran-
Roberts said he was leaving the
building when the officers threatened to
use force and told him he was not to en-
ter any University buildings in the
future, a prohibition he says infringes
on his constitutional rights.
Robert's complaint says the ban
would keep him from voting if his

assigned polling place is located in a
University building, denies him the
right to medical care at University
Hospital, and bars him from attending
performances or eating in University
building open to the public.
A spokesperson at the FBI said the
bureau must decide whether the com-
plaint is within their jurisdication
before they can file charges.
University security officials declined
to discuss the incident.
'U' names

YOUR UNM IS WORTH AN
OFFICER'SOMISSION
IN THE ARM
Your BSN means you're a professional. In the Army, it also
means you're an officer. You start as a full-fledged member of our
medical team. Write: Army Nurse Opportunities,
P.O. Box 7713, Burbank, CA 91510.
A Y N EORPS.
BE ALLYUCAN BE.,

..

Eli

HAPPENINGS temporary

Highlights
The University Philharmonia and The University Choir under the direc-
tion of Patrick Gardner and Carl St. Clair will perform Vaughan Williams'
Serenade to Music and Beethoven's Choral Fantasia at 8 p.m. tonight at Hill
Auditorium.
Films
AAFC-Baby It's You, 7 & 9 p.m., MLB 4.
Alt. Act. - Ann of 1,000 Days, 7 p.m.; Mary. Queen of Scots. 9:30 p.m.. Nat.
SCI. DLB.
Cinema Guild - Derzu Uzala, 7 & 9 p.m., Lorch Hall.
Cinema II - Gallipoli, 7 & 9 p.m., Aud. A, Angell.
Mediatrics - Last Tango In Paris, 7 & 9:15, MLB Aud. 3.
Performances
The Ark - Jim Post, 8 p.m., 1421 Hill Auditorium.
Music School Recital - Pamela Jean Sternad, 8 p.m., Rackham Assembly
Hall Performance Network - "Dangerous Times" 8 p.m., 408 W.
Washington.
PTP - "Rivals," 8p.m., Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Halfway Inn - Plain Truth, Ground Zero, and Dissonance, 9 p.m., Half-
way Inn, Corner of Hill and Church. Admission $2.50.
Ann Arbor Women's Peace Camp - "Children of a Lesser God," and "The
Civil Defense Primer," 8 p.m., at the Performance Network, 408 W.
Washington. Tickets are $3-$5. For information call 995-5871.
Speakers
Anthropology Colloquium - Elinor Melwville, "The Pastoral Economy in
16th Century Mexico," 4 p.m., 2053 LSA.
Guild House - Sallyanne Payton, Professor, University of Michigan Law
School will speak at the continuing series "Women's Lives," noon, Guild
House, 802 Monroe. For information, call 662-5189.
Astronomy - Robert Kirshner, "Dark Matter in the Universe," 8:30 p.m.,
Aud. B, Angell.
South and Southeast Asian Studies - Suresh Vasant, "The Junnat Caves of
Maharashtra and Their Environs," noon, 130 Lane Hall.
Law School - Peter L. Berger will present the William Cook lecture on
Dimensions of Pluralism: Religion and Morality in America, "Churches as
Mediating Structures," 4 p.m., MLB 1.
Aerospace Engineering - Undergraduate Seminar, Robert Buchanan,
"Current Flight Test Capabilities and Career Opportunities," 3:30-5 p.m.,
107 Aerospace Engineering Building.
Meetings
Korean Christian Fellowship Bible Study - 9 p.m., Campus Chapel.
Ann Arbor Chinese Bible Class - 7:30 p.m., University Reformed Church.
Chinese Students Christian Fellowship - "Fellowship and Bible Study,"
7:30 p.m., 730 Tappan.
American Cancer Society - Washtenaw County unit meeting, 7 and 8
p.m., 4105 Jackson Rd.

minority
Services
worker
By GEORGEA KOVANIS
University officials yesterday named
a temporary replacement for the black
student representative in the minority
services office.
Donna Hodge, a doctoral candidate in
psychology, will replace Valerie Glenn,
who resigned last month after a
University audit of the office's books.
Hodge was selected over one other
candidate by a committee consisting of
Vice President for Student Services
Henry Johnson, Ellen Offen, the
assistant director of the Office of Com-
munity Services, and the minority
student services staff members.
Offen said Hodge will begin work next
week and will continue in the position
until a permanent replacement is
found. The position will be opened for
applicants Monday.
Q RIBS:. PCA T
CHICKEN FR
O SHRIMP
10 SEAFOODS
DINNERS' SANDWICHES * SIDE ORDERS
CARRY - OUTS
%OR DELIVERY SERVICE
D~ADYT~1 nVf T CCD £ rf!'C,

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EXHIBITION
AND SALE of
FINE ART REPRODUCTIONS

NEW THIS YEAR:
" CLASSIC PHOTOGRAPHS
" POST CARDS
" EXHIBITION POSTERS
" RARE PRINTS

Michigan Union Presents

MON.-FRI., OCT. 17-21
10:00 a.m.-5 p.m.
POND ROOM
MICHIGAN UNION
(Oct. 20-Anderson Room)

FEATURING: Old Masters,
Impressionism, Surrealism,
Van Gogh, Picasso, Escher,
19th - 20th Century American,
E. S. Curtis, Norman Rockwell,
Oriental Art and Museum
Posters from the Metropolitan,
Walker, Guggenheim, National
Gallery and more.

PRICES
MOST LARGE PRINTS
S3-50 each or 3 for S 9.00

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