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October 08, 1983 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-10-08

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ARTS

the Michigan Daily

Saturday, October 8, 1983

Page !

'Reformed art
at 'U' museum

Records

By Maureen Megerian
F YOU MISSED the international
conference celebrating the 500th an-
niversary of Martin Luther's birth,
don't you fret - there is still time to
celebrate. In conjunction with this quin-
ticentennial, the University Museum of
Art is exhibiting "Prints from the Time
of the Reformation." The show runs.
through October 9.
The exhibit is organized by Lee Wan-
del,a doctoral candidate in the history
department whose specialization is the
Reformation and its relation to nor-
thern European manuscript
illumination and woodcuts.
"When I found out that the museum
was going to have this show I was ex-
tremely enthusiastic," explains Wan-
del. A brief text, written by Wandel, ac-
companies the exhibit and explains the
historical context within which the
specific works were wrought.
All of the prints on display are owned
by the Museum of Art, except for one
engraving on loan from the Detroit In-
stitute of Arts. "Al of the artists
represented were somehow involved
with the Reformation," says Wandel.
"Many of the prints actually pre-date
the Reformation, but they.offer an idea
of the iconography and themes of the
scripture which convey the theological
message of Martin Luther."
The works portray common biblical
themes, such as a scene from the
Prodigal Son and a number of scenes
from the Passion of Christ from
Albrecht Durer's woodcut series. The
only non-narrative work is the Detroit

loan of Durer's engraving of a portrait
of Melanchthon, a leading Protestant
intellectual of the time.
The exhibit itself is small - only 11
prints - and it is fairly dwarfed by the
large-scale Gerome Kamrowski
retrospective also at the museum. But
the selection of prints, austerely
displayed on the north and south walls
near the museum entrance, are
visually arresting in their own way and
command careful scrutiny.
The delicacy of line which these ar-
tists were able to achieve is especially
fascinating, given the medium in which
they worked. The lines of an actual
print are not directly applied by the ar-
tist's hand; rather, the artist transfers
his design in reverse from a metalor
wood surface onto paper. Thus, the ar-
tist must be particularly skillful in
determining the design of his lines so
that they effectively transfer.
The degree of realistic detail in these
prints is fascinating, particularly when
realizing that the artist achieves this ef-
fect solely by his application of line.
Albrecht Durer, the great master of the
print, is well represented in the exhibit.
A work such as his "Christ Before
Caiaphus" perfectly illustrates his ar-
tistry in the medium. This tiny work is
visually compelling because of its
preciseness of detail. Through his
careful use of line, Durer achieves the
effect of the scene's dark, enclosed
background, as well as minutely
detailed objects and figures within the
scene itself.
Beyond displayaing the delicate
beauty of the individual works, the exhi
bit and accompanying text enlightens
the viewer as to the effects of Refor-

THAT MOST corporate of corporate
rock bands has actually gone and
done it. Asia's much-ballyhooed second
album, Alpha, is about as close to a
carbon copy of the band's multi-
platinum debut as possible. There isn't
any sense ~ of forward motion or
progression at all-just the sound that
sends people dashing for the cash
registers.
To be fair, the noises Asia makes are
pretty impressive, and the musicians
themselves are top-notch. Carl
Palmer's crisp, tasty drumming forms
a firm foundation, over which Geoff
Downs layers a thick blanket of syn-
thesizers. John Wetton is one of the
strongest rock singers around, and
Steve Hows is capable of stinging,
pungent guitar work. Glossed over with
Mike Stone's ultra-clean production,
Alpha resembles nothing so much as a
hot fudge sundae with all the goodies on
top.
It's too bad that the songs themselves
prove non-nutritious. The rumbling
rock tunes aren't much more than ex-
cuses to trot out Wetton's vacuum-
packed harmonies and Downes' elec-
tronic orchestras. Ballads such as "The
Smile Has Left Your Eyes" and "The
Last to Know" have some potential, but
their melodic charms are smothered by
the pompous sonic overkill. On top of all
this, Howe's guitar- which cut through
similar fog on the first album quite
nicely-is mixed down just far enough
for it to lose its edge. Seems the last
thing this music is meant to do is to
startle anybody.
In the same smooth, faceless vein,
the lyrics are little more than typical
romance fare. Boy meets girl and
sparks fly" in "Don't Cry" and "The
Heat Goes On." Girl dumps boy in "The

Last to Know" and "True Colors," but
the boy comes out on top in "My Own
Time (I'll Do What I Want"). Wetton
sings the cliches so seriously it's funny
at times, especially when you consider
the complete lack of depth or
originality involved. Then again, it
doesn't seem that either of these
qualities fit into Asia's game plan.
Why do above average musicians

play such average, lowest-common-
denominator stuff? Good pop songs
with few surprises or new musical
angles would be great in such capable
hands, but the utterly predictable can-
dy riffs and greeting card verses on
Alpha hardly qualify. As it stands, this
album is Muzak with a monster beat, as
easy to ignore as it is to listen to. Which
may explainits popularity.
- Jeff Segal

2nd Story 215S.S
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'Adam and Ere'
... at the Museum of Art
mation thought on the visual arts of the
time.
The works themselves, however, may
be so captivating as to outweigh their
original social significance to the
modern viewer. This seems reason
enough to visit the museum's exhibit.

Michigan Daily
Phone 764-0558

Matthews leads Phils past L.A.

By SCOOP BRADLEY
Special to the Daily
PHILADELPHIA-Gary Matthews
drove in four runs with a homer and two
singles, and Charles Hudson pitched a
four-hitter yesterday to lead the
Philadelphia Phillies to a 7-2 victory
over the Los Angeles Dodgers and a 2-1
lead in the National League Champion-
ship series.
Matthews' homer, a solo shot, came
off of reliever Alejandro Pena in the
fourth inning to give the Phillies a 4-2
lead. He knocked in a pair of runs in the
fifth with a single and another in the
seventh with his third hit of the day.
THE PHILLIES SCORED two in the
second inning without the benefit of a
hit. Starter Bob Welch walked Mat-
thews and Greg Gross. Pena came in

and threw a wild pitch to Bo Diaz which , series tonight at Veteran's Stadium at
advanced the two runners. 8:05 p.m.
Pena then fired another pitch past Scoop Bradley used to be a Daily
catcher Jack Fimple on which Mat- sports writer. Now he's a struggling
thews scored. Gross then scored when journalist in Philadelphia with
Ivan DeJesus grounded out. nothing better to do than write for
Hudson struck out nine during the his former student newspaper. He'll
game, and the only Dodger runs he
allowed came on Mike Marshall's two- be in Ann Arbor for the Ohio State
run homer in the fourth. football game and four days of
The Phillies will try to wrap up the drunkeness. If he has a good time,
tell him.

sPresents -
/Y~'

Matthews
... drives in four

'Upsets abound in
Virginia Slims play

Sun., Oct.23
Crisler Arena
8pm
12.50,11.50,10.50
On Sale 9/23/83
MI Union Ticket
Off ice.CTC
763-2071

By JEFF HARRISON
Special to the Daily
DETROIT - Yesterday was the day
of upsets at the Virginia Slims Tennis
Tournament in Detroit. In all four of the
quarterfinal matches, the underdog
prevailed over the favorite.
The upsets started with fifth-seed Zina
Garrison ousting second-seed Sylvia
Hanika 2-6, 6-2, 6-2. In the second mat-
ch, unseeded Sharon Walsh eliminated
sixth-seed Barbara Potter, 6-1, 6-3.
THE UPSETS continued in the third
match with number-seven seed Kathy
Jordan soundly defeating Hana Man-
dlikova, the number-four seed, 6-0, 6-0.
Eighth-seeded Virginia Ruzici topped
off the evening with a decisive victory
over Wendy Turnbull 6-1, 6-2. Turnbull,
who was complaining of a cold, at-
tributed part of her loss to "ridiculous
umpiring during the first game of the

match, and I let it bother me through
the whole match."
Rucizi was pleased just to get into the
quarter final match as she was down in
her previous match 6-0, 2-0 to Grosse
Point's Suzi Mascarin and came back to
win 0-6, 6-2, 6-0. In regard to the up-
coming semi-final match against
Walsh, Rucizi commented, "I've never
lost to Sharon, but she is always
,dangerous."
The other semi-final match up today
is Jordan versus Garrison. Play is at
Cobo Arena and starts at 6:30 p.m.
THE DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS
ARE A GREAT
WAY TO GET
FAST RESULTS

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