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October 04, 1983 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-10-04

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4

Page 6 - The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, October 4, 1983
Nicaraguan
Military commanders from El Saturday at a ranch
Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala City. It was also atte
announced yesterday they will take Paul Gorman, hea
"common action'' and are prepared to Southern Command in
"use force" against leftist-ruled The military chief
Nicaragua. situation and conditi
Although there was no mention of the Central American
Nicaragua's leftist Sandinista gover- the extracontinental
nment by name, the wording of the joint threat that att
communique that was made public democracy and the C
yesterday left no doubt of the target. peoples' vocation fc
The decision was made at a meeting statement said.

foes unite

near Guatemala
nded by Lt. Gen.
ad of the U.S.
Panama.
s "reviewed the
ion prevalent in
region, in view of
Marxist-Leninist
empts against
Central American
or liberty," the

It also said they agreed to revive the
Central American Defense Council, a
defense organization set up in 1963 at
the urging of'the United States to fight
subversion in the region allegedly
promoted by the Communist regime in
Cuba. The Central American Defense
Council had previously been inactive
since a 1969 border war between Hon-
duras and El Salvador.

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Waters from the raging San Francisco River rush through the copper mining town of Clifton, Arizona, Sunday. The
southeastern Arizona community of 4,200 was ripped in half and much of it was swept away. Yesterday, the town was
without electricity, water or phone service except for a microwave line from a sheriff's office.
Worst disaster in memory
leaves 11 dead in Arizona

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From AP and UPI
TUCSON, Ariz. - Heavy rain fell
again yesterday in normally arid
southeastern Arizona, adding to
devastating floodingsthat left 11 people
dead or missing as officials sought
federal help for victims of the state's
worst natural disaster in memory.
"The state has not seen a disaster like
this before," said John Paulsen,
spokesman for the state Division of
Emergency Services. "But fortunately,
at this point, the river systems have
crested."
THE NATIONAL Weather Service
forecasted scatteredshowers through
today in southeastern Arizona, but said
no heavy rains were anticipated.
The weekend floods left thousands of
people homeless or stranded and
destruction estimated in the millions of
dollars.
Normally dry rivers meandering
through the desert were swollen to
record levels by up to 6 inches of rain in
southeastern Arizona, surged over their
banks and washed away buildings and
bridges.
TUCSON, the nearby cotton farming
town of Marana, and the mining com-
munity of Clifton near New Mexico
were the hardest hit by three days of
heavy rains.
Marana Mayor Bill Schisler said his
town was virtually deserted but that

residents had accepted the evacuation
''like little troopers."
"Twenty-five percent of Marana is
under water and in another 25 percent
water is up to the doors," the mayor
said.
"THE ONLY THING we could
salvage was our kids," said Fred
Ramone, 24, who left his flooded home
in Rillito for nearby Marana, then had
to be evacuated again from Marana to
Tucson. "My family got out - that's the
main thing," he said, adding that he
lost his home, car and farm animals to
the floods.
In Marana, the water spread out in a
3-mile swath, filling a 100-foot-wide
riverbed that usually stands dry,
drowning cotton and sorghum fields and
flooding over a thousand homes. Ap-
proximately 2,000 residents were
evacuated, and power was expected to
be out for several days, authorities
said.
An overflowing wash forced officials
to evacuate portions of the Arizona
Training Center at Coolidge, which
houses 300 mentally retarded people.
Jerry Dandoy, director of developmen-
tal disabilities for the state, said there
was no extensive damage and a total
evacuation was not expected.
In Clifton, about 100 miles northeast of
Tucson on the San Francisco River,
more than half the town had been swept

away, leaving the 4,200 residents
without electricity, water or phone ser-
vice.
In Cochise County, an earthen dam
ruptured Sunday, creating a shallow
lake between one-half and' 2 /-miles
wide and approximately 30 miles long,
said Lt. Larry Dever of the sheriff's of-
fice.
Two rescue workers were killed Sun-
day morning when their Department of
Public Safety helicopter crashed near
Marana, officials said. The chopper
was rushing to Catalina City, where a
pregnant woman could not be taken to
Tucson by ambulance because of
flooding.
A 25-year-old Tucson man was
presumed drowned after his truc
stalled and was swept down Tangu
Verde Wash east of Tucson on Saturday
night and a 37-year-old Apache Jun-
ction man was missing after being
swept away Sunday while standing
along the banks of the Santa Cruz River
near Casa Grande.
In addition, two Navy crewmeri died
Friday when their plane crashed in
Mohave County, four people were swept
off the roof of a pickup truck near Ash
Fork in northern Arizona, and a woman
was killed in a Phoenix automobil
collision that officials attributed to
storms.

in the heart of downtown Ann Arbor
Special good thru October 31.
314 S. Fourth Avenue Ann Arbor 662-8485

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