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October 01, 1983 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-10-01

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M
:..

Officials

The Michigan Daily, Saturday, October 1,1983- Page 3
name education

school transition team

By JACKIE YOUNG
Seven professors from the School of
Education and an LSA English
professor have been named to the
education school transition team,
University officials announced yester-
day.
The transition team, along with of-
ficials from the vice president for
academic affairs' office, will formulate
strategies for implementing the major
budget cuts approved for the school last
month.
The $1.9 million cut, which is
equivalent to 40 percent of the school's
budget, may lead to a reduction in the
school's faculty from 75 to 45 professors
in the next five years.
Cocaine sut
pegs players
(continued from Page 1)
MICHIGAN football coach Bo
Schembechler said yesterday he
"didn't want to discuss" the case.
Durastanti, 32, who pled guilty to
conspiracy charges six months ago,
served four months in a Florida prison
and received three years probation,
said his attorney David Roth, in West
Palm Beach, Fla.

EDUCATION DEAN Carl Berger
said the team will work from now until
late March of next year, but must come
up with plans for the school by mid-
January.
Vice President for Academic Affairs
and Provost Billy Frye will review the
reorganization plan by Feb. 1, Berger
said, and it should be ready to be im-
plemented by March 31.
In its work, the transition team will
consult with the school's executive
committee, division chairpersons, and
other faculty members and students,
Berger said.
THE FINAL recommendations on the
future of the school is the sole respon-
sibility of the transition team, Berger

said. The group is charged to "think
and act in the best interest off ,-the
School of Education and the Uiver-
sity," Berger said in a memo to the
school's faculty.
Education school professors appoin-
ted to the team are: Percy Bates,
Frederick Bertolaet, Phyllis Blurnan-
feld, Arthur Coxford, Scott Paris, Mar-
vin Peterson, and Kenneth Watkin.
English Prof. Jay Robinson is the lone
faculty member on the team from out-
side the school.
Bertolaet and other members of the
transition team said their first meeting
will be held Tuesday. Members contac-
ted last night said they do not yet hive
any specific plans made but will begin
the process Tuesday and appoint- a
spokesperson for the group then.
Ak-

Read
and
Use
Daily
Classifieds

Daily Photo by JEFF SCHRIER

Slurp
Three-and-a-half-year-old Meghan Sharp takes a break from her playground activities at Burns Park.

J

A nti-Marcos rally
crushed by police

MANILA, Philippines (AP)-Hun-
dreds of office workers wearing yellow
ribbons of protest occupied a fancy
department store and rallied in the
financial district in one of four anti-
government demonstrations yesterday.
Police routed them with tear gas,
water hoses and bullets in the air.
Police said some of the demon-
strators also fired guns and hurled'*
firebombs and rocks at them, and that
14 officers were wounded and nine
protesters arrested in the Makati
business center.
THOUSANDS OF others rallied at the
main post office, in the Greenhills
commercial district and at a church.
President Ferdinand Marcos, mean-
while, appeared on nationwide
television and threatened businessmen
who smuggle hard currency abroad
with up to 20 years in prison. He also
replaced the head of the government
commission investigating the Aug. 21
assassination of opposition leader
Benigno Aquino.
Aquino's murder has cast suspicion
on the -government, the powerful
military, and the six-man commission
Marcos appointed to investigate the
killing.
AQUINO'S followers wore yellow
when he arrived at the airport last mon-
th from three years' voluntary exile in
4 the United States. They chose the color
because of a popular American song in

which a man jailed for three years
askes his sweetheart to tie a yellow rib-
bon around an oak tree if she still loves
him.
The Makati demonstrators also were
ablaze with yellow ribbons, flowers and
country" and the violent suppression
into the elegant Rustans department
store, crowding the aisles and
escalators but not buying anything.
Opposition groups claim the store is
owned by Marcos' wife Imelda Marcos.
She denies it.
People chanted, "We want Marcos...
We want Marcos... Out." Riot police
finally charged and scattered the
demonstrators.
Meanwhile, about 2,000 students
rallied in front of the main post office in
downtown Manila. They condemned
the "tight political repression in the
clothing. About 300 of them poured on-
of anti-Marcos protests by state
authorities.
The post office rally had been
authorized in advance and police did
not interfere.
In San Fernando, 47 miles north of
Manila, about 3,000 people overflowed a
Roman Catholic church were Aquino's
mother Aurora gave an emotional one-
hour speech pleading for the
restoration of democracy in the coun-
try.

-HAPPENINGS
Highlight
The San Francisco Video Festival 1982 Traveling Show will be presented at
the Performance Network, 408 W. Washington, at 8 p.m. The show's first act
is dedicated to Nam June Paik and the second act is comprised of six pieces
by west coast video artists. Tickets are $5 general admission and $4 for
students.
Films
Ann Arbor Film Coop - Lola, 6:15 & 10 p.m., The Blue Angel, 8:20 p.m.,
MLB 4.
Alternative Action - Frances, 7 & 9:30 p.m., MLB 3.
Cinema II - Padre, Padrons, 7 & 9:05 p.m., Aud. A, Angell.
Cinema Guild - Diva, 7 & 9:15 p.m., Lorch.
Classic Film Theater - La Cage Aux Folles, 7 & 10:30 p.m., La Cage Aux
F'olles II, 8:40 p.m., MIchigan Theater.
Hill St. Cinema - The Wizard of Oz, 8:30 & 10:30 p.m., 1429 Hill.
Mediatrics - My Favorite Year, 6:30, 8:15 and 10 p.m., Nat. Sci. Aud.
Performances
Ark - Pub sing with John Roberts and Tony Barrand, 8 p.m., 1421 Hill.
Indian Student Assn - "Shakuntala," a classical Indian dance drama,
Clague Junior High School, 2612 Nixon Rd.
Eclipse Jazz - concert, Jerome Cooper, 9 p.m., University Club.
University Musical Society - violinist Issaac Stern, 8:30 p.m., Hill Aud.
School of Music - Carillon demonstration, 11 a.m.-noon, Burton Tower.
Speakers
ICLE - Frank Kennedy, "Partners and Partnerships Under the Bankrup-
tcy Code," 9-11 a.m., 116 Hutchins Hall.
Women's International League for Peace and Freedom - Dan Axelrod,
"U.S. Efforts to Start and Win A Nuclear War," 11:30 a.m., Ann Arbor
Public Library.
Meetings
Ann Arbor Go-Club - 2-7 p.m., 1443 Mason Hall.
Tae Kwon Do Club - 9-11 p.m., CCRB Martial Arts Room..
Environmental Law Society - Symposium and panel discussion on en-
vironmental law public interest and jobs, 2 p.m., 100 Hutchins Hall.

,.

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