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September 30, 1983 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-09-30

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The Michigan Daily -,Friday, September 30, 1983 - Page 3
175 marchers protest

'U'

defense

By PETE WILLIAMS
A silent candlelight march to protest
defense research at the University at-
tracted more than 175 people Wed-
nesday night, far more than the demon-
stration's organizers had expected.
The march, which was held in com-
plete silence to heighten impact, began
at 11:15 p.m. in front of the Public
Health Building where University
researchers are working on a Pentagon
contract to find an antidote for nerve
gas. The group stopped briefly at North
Hall to hear an anti-ROTC speech
before finishing in front of President
Harold Shapiro's home, where the
protesters formed a peace sign and
spelled the word "peace" with candle
flames.
Progressive Student Network mem-
bers who organized the protest, said
they had not anticipated such a large
turnout.
"THE TURNOUT, shows that hun-
dreds of students are concerned about
what's going on," said PSN member
Amos Cornfeld. "It proves that people
do care."
Marchers broke the silence only at
North Hall, where PSN member Mark
Weinstein criticized the Reagan ad-
ministration for reducing civilian
financial aid while increasing the num-
ber of scholarships offered by the
military services.
"(ROTC applicants) believe that the
ROTC offers the only chance for them
to obtain a good education and em-
ployment opportunities in the future,"
Weinstein said.

research
THE MARCH concluded at Shapiro's
house because "he is supporting
militarism on our campus," Cornfeld
said. While there, individual protesters
called out descriptions of a number of
defense research projects and then
blew out their candles. Demonstrators
also sang anti-war songs.
Protesters said they hoped the
demonstration would force Shapiro to
pay attention to their concerns.
"We, who advocate non-violence,
wish to speak with the negative ad-
ministration," said March Wells, a
senior in the Residential College. "If
we cooperate to make (peace) happen,
it will."
MANY OF THE protesters said they
participated in the march because they
believe a university campus is the
wrong place to be conductiong military
research.
"At least we're not just sitting
around," said Janet Mandell, an LSA
senior. "We are an example for other
groups on other campuses. 'k
Participants said they didn't know if
the march would have any tangible
results, but they said it would serve to
keep the opposition to defense research
in the public eye.
"People saw us," said one protester,
who did not identify himself. "This is a
sign that the issue of military research
is far from dead."

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Daily Photo by TOD WOOLF
Candle holding students protest defense research on campus, in front of President Shapiro's house, Wednesday night.
City finds shelter for homeless

BY TRACEY MILLER
Ann Arbor's Commission on
I Emergency Housing yesterday settled
on a location that it will recommend to

the City Council to shelter the city's in-
digent population.
Although the commission did not
release the actual location, members
said it was close to downtown. Rent on

the property which was identified as a
residence, would be $1200 per month,
but the city council must approve
allocations for the home before a lease
can be signes.
ALTHOUGH THERE would be an op-
See SHELTER, Page 9

Fim

Flir,

-HAPPENINGS-
Highlight
Agnes Mary Mansour, director of the Michigan Department of Social Ser-
vices, will address the University's School of Social Work Alumni Society
today at 7:30 p.m., at the Ann Arbor Inn. People interested in advance
tickets should contact the Alumni Association.
Films
Altenative Action - The Exorist, 7 & 9:15 p.m., MLB 4.
Mediatrics - A Star is Born (1954 version), 6:30 p.m.. A Star is Born
(1976 version), 9:10 p.m., MLB 3.
AAFC - The French Lieutenant'a Woman, 7 & 9:20 p.m., Nat. Sci. Aud.
CFT - East of Eden, 5:30 & 9:30 p.m., Rebel Without a Cause, 7:30 & 11:30
p.m., Michigan Theater.
Cinema II - The Hunger, 7 & 9 p.m., Angell Aud. A.
Cinema Guild - Life of Brian, 7, 8:40 & 10:20 p.m., Lorch.
Guild House - Luncheon and film, The~Clan: Legacy of Hate, noon, 802
Monroe.
Performances
School of Music - Harpsichord recital, Edward Parmentier, 8 p.m.,
Recital Hall.
Performance Network - San Francisco Video Festival 1982 Traveling
Show, 8 p.m., 408 W. Washington.
Ark - Pub sing with John Roberts & Tony Barrabd, Gerry O'Kane
(Rakish Paddy), Brendan & Terrance McKinney & Jim O'Callahan, 8 p.m.,
1421 Hill.
Drama & Theatre; Dutch Government; Netherlands America, University
League - One man performance by Jules Croiset, "A Tea Party with the
Pieters Family," from "Wouterje Pieterse," and "A Certain Vincent," from
letters from Vincent Van Gogh, 8 p.m., Trueblood Theatre.
The Brecht Company - "A Man's a Man," 8 p.m., R.C. Auditorium. .
Speakers
South & Southeast Asian Studies - Brown bag lecture, Elizabeth Gosling,
"Architecture in Thailand Prior to the Ayuttay Period," 12-1 p.m., Lane Hall
Commons Rm.
Astronomy - Gerard Kriss, "The Masses of Stars & Planets," 8:30 p.m.,
Angell Aud. B.
Third World Women's Concerns; Gender Research; CRED-Brown bag,
Eliana Moy-Raggio, "Latin America's New Feminism: A Report on the
Second Meeting of Latin American & Caribbean Feminism," 12 p.m., Inter-
national Center.
Aerospace Eng. - Undergrad sem., Richard Snyder, "Crash Survival
Design Consideration for the Engineer," 3:30 p.m., 107 Aerospace Eng.
Bldg.
Nuclear Eng. - Colloquium, Paul Lykoudis, "Two-Phase Flow in
Liquified Metals in the Presence of Magnetic Fields," 3:45 p.m., White Aud.,
Cooley Bldg.
University Press Club - John Seigenthaler, USA Today editorial director,
Campus Inn.
Nat. Resources - Colloquium on acid rain, Nat Sekahar of Bechtal Power
Corp; Constance Boris, natural resources; Morton Sterling, Detroit Edison;
Paul Rago, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Rupert Cutter, National Audobon
Society; 1:45 p.m., 1040ODana.
Meetings
Korean Christian Fellowship - Bible study meeting, 9 p.m., Campus
Chapel.
Ann Arbor Chinese Bible Class - 7:30 p.m., University Reformed Church.
Tae Kwon Do Club - Practice, 5 p.m., CCRB Martial Arts Rm.
Diplicate Bridge Club - Open game, 7:15 p.m., League.
Chinese Students Christian Fellowship - 7:30 p.m., Memorial Christian
Church.
Folk Dance Club - Armenian folk dances, 8-9:30 p.m., followed by request
dancing till midnight, dance studio at corner of State and E. William.
Michigan Journal of Political Science - Wine and cheese party
celebrating publication, 3 p.m., Haven Hall sixth floor lounge.
Miscellaneous
Women's Athletics - Volleyball, Michigan vs. Northwestern, 7 p.m.,
CCRB.
Museum of Art - Art break, Ginny Castor, "Gerome Kamrowski: A
Retrospective Exhibition," 12:10 p.m., W. Gallery.
4-H Youth Programs - Theatre skills workshop, 7 p.m., 4133 Washtenaw.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI. 48109.
:. i {L! A fl.iii:i. /i.:r i.Ll. '.LLL4iiii ~i"'' 1''l! "" *1l

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