100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 29, 1983 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-09-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


The Michigan Daily - Thursday, September 29, 1983 - Page 9
How the 'U' is helping schools

W1 2 I W1V TI] :
LI NDIVIDUAL THEATRES
5th Ave oatliberty 701-0700

(Continued from Page 1)
education in Michigan is poor, Sjogren
said.
But he contends that strict standards
may not guarantee quality education,
since students might opt for easier
classes to obtain a higher grade point
average.
INSTEAD OF setting higher stan-
dards for all students, schools should
take care to offer more advanced
placement courses in their curriculum
for the above-averge student. "We want
students with intellectual curiosity to
be satisfied in school," Sjogren said.
He added that the students should not
be sent to community colleges or forced
to graduate early because they "should
benefit from the full educational
process," which includes the
emotional, development offered by the
high school environment.
The University offers several
programs to help high schools improve
their teaching quality and curriculum.
These include:
" A chemistry department program
which- coordinates selected faculty
members and students in Detroit high
schools to conduct year-long research
projects that often culminate in
published papers and science contest
winners;
* The English Composition Board's
seminars and workshops with high
school faculty members to improve in-
struction in writing. The Board has led
lstaff and curriculum development, and
has provided in-service training in
some state school districts. The
program may be expanded to include
other disciplines;
* The College of Engineering's three
programs aimed at minority students
in Detroit, Flint, and Washtenaw Coun-
ty. Middle school and high school
students are exposed to various
engineering and technical fields through
seminars, engineering clubs, field
trips, science fairs, and summer
programs at the University.
- Minority Counselors in University
admissions offices who visit junior high
schools to encourage students to take
college preparatory courses; and
" Participation in high school College
Night programs that educate college-
bound students about the University's
admission standards and academic

ENDS TONIGHT!
"LA NUIT DE VARENNES" (R)
at 7:00, 9:15

programs.
The University also has two small
programs that allow a limited number
of exceptionally bright high school
students to enroll in University courses,
but Sjogren said this program is only
for students whose schools simply can-
not meet the students' achievement
level.
The University will also continue to
use its School of Education to help
upgrade secondary education. Because
of the school's recent 40 percent budget
cut and the still unconfirmed changes in
its structure, Dean Carl Berger said
school officials don't know exactly what
role they will play in teacher education.
The University administration has
also rejected a key budget review
panel's recommendation that the
School of Education's Bureau of School
Services be eliminated.
The bureau accredits elementary and
secondary schools for the state of
Michigan, and works with under-
privg.eged schools to upgrade their
programs and resources, according to
its director, Kent Leach.
Generally, high schools that send
students to the University are positive
about the University's role in im-
proving secondary education. Some
would like to see University professors
visit high schools as guest lecturers and
advisers.
One Bloomfield Hills principal
stressed the need for more college
graduates with a background in math
and science to enter the ranks of
education.
"Math and science teachers are at a
premium," said John Thoma at An-
dover High School. "I need both right
now, but probably won't be able to fill
the positions. Another teacher will most
likely end up taking on an additional
class.
"We would love to see math and
science majors put some time into
education. With a little training in
dealing with high school students, they
would certianly be qoalified,"he said.
Because 90 percent of Bloomfield
Hills students are enrolled in coll.ege-
preparatory classes, a tougher ad-
mission policy at the University would
most likely not affect the work his stud-
ents do.

But bright students from the poorer
school districts may benefit from
changes in college admission standards
- changes that would force weaker
school systems to reevaluate the
rigidity of their programs.
Danielle McCluskey, an 18-year-old
LSA senior from Novi, complained of
the demise of advanced placement
classes and range of difficult courses by
their school. "By the time I was a junior
I had taken the highest math and
English classes offered," she said
"I enrolled in a community college,
but I know of a lot of bright people who
just get frustrated, bored and give up,"
she said.

JULIE CHRISTIE in ...
AND
Set in two time spans . .. it tells the si
of a modern young Englishwoman and
Great Aunt who lived in India in the M9

story
Iher
20's
(R}

Join the Daily Staff

BOB DASCOLA
and staff
South U & East U
are now at
DASCOLA STYLISTS
668-9329
opposite Jacobsons

FRI. 7:00, 9:15

HE'S PUT ON TRIAL FOR A SECOND TIME. IF
FOUND TO BE AN IMPOSTOR HE WILL HANG.
GERARD DE PARDIEU
THUR. FRI. 7:25, 9:30

al ow a^4 m 904 5 0,0.,O,.",,O"o ................. 0

Daily Photo by TOD WOOLF

Sir Martin Roth, a renowned expert on Alzheimer's Disease, speaks yester-
day at the Michigan Union. He stressed that early diagnosis of the disease is
of crucial importance.
OAlzheimer/' research
slow, expert says

-...A

By CAROLINE MULLER
Despite a growing number of senior
citizens afflicted with Alzheimer's
c. a form of pream.ur;
w .earch on the subject remains
Sstagnant, an internationally-known ex-
pert on the disease said yesterday.
Sir Martin Roth, a professor of
psychiatry at New Addenbrookes
Hospital in Cambridge, England, told
an audience at the Michigan Union that
the biggest obstacle facing researchers
is difficulty finding consenting patients
on whom to do research.
ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE is a
degenerative brain disorder that ac-
celerates senility. Symptoms of the
disorder include memory loss, speech
impairment, and emotional fluc-
tuations.
Roth said the damage to the brain
'does not come from any single event,
but is rather a collective process.
"Every form of brain damage must
be considered to contribute to
senility...just because the symptoms
show up after a certain point - or
.threshold - doesn't mean the events
t before should be ignored," Roth said.
HE ADDED THAT symptoms of
Alzheimer's might not appear until ten
.years after chemical; damage to the
brain occurs.
"Early diagnosis is of crucial impor-
tance," Roth said. "Alzheimer's
?Disease belongs with such groups as
diabetes, central nervous system ten-
sion ...diseases that have a structural
breakdown."
Research into Alzheimer's lags, Roth
said, because of a lack of money from
corporations, which are unwilling to
give money to long-term projects.
THE MOST IMPORTANT advances
in Alzheimer's research, Roth said,

have been emerging patterns in the lit-
tle research that has been conducted.
"Research must have a pattern and the
h~ "he said.
ah recem- arch fun-
ded by the Kellogg Company which
compared premature senility (ages 50
to 60) and old-age senility (ages 70 to
80).
Roth said the two groups exhibited
distinct characteristics even though
both are formed by a deficit of a certain
chemical in the brain.
The results of Roth's study will ap-
pear next year in The Journal of
Psychiatry.

II
- I
1 307 S. Fifth Ave. ANY LARGE U
662-83027 mSANDWICH;
* Hrs. M-Th.11lam-7pm A
* Fri. & Sat. 11 am-11 pmJP
DELIVERIES SUN. ONLY JUST CLIP TIS AD
1 4 pm-9 pm ($5.00 minimum order) Exp 10/6/83 1
-== --------=-=-------=mm===in=J

DAVIS.
Oct.6, 8pm-A
Pooer Center i-
8.507,o1

-~. _ ,

w4Di)

Computer Science
Engineering (E.E. and M.E.)
Technical Sales
Business Administration (M.B.A.)
Students
Come Meet
Carmen Palermo,
Vice President-
A Che Scientist of
Harris Corporation
Government Systems Sector

The
standard
for
language,
usage,
and clear
thinking
for nearly
sixty years:

A University of Michigan alumnus, now the Vice President-Chief Scientist of the
Fortune 200 Harris Corporation, Government Systems Sector, returns to his alma mater
to discuss career opportunities at Harris Corporation.
Dr. Palermo received his doctorate at the University of Michigan while working at the
Radar and Optics Laboratory of the Institute of Science and Technology. He later
returned to teach in the Electrical Engineering Department and Information and
Control Departments while continuing his research.
Dr. Palermo will host an Open House on Wednesday, October 5th, from 6:00 p.m. to
9:00 p.m. at the Student Union Building, 2nd Floor in the Pendleton Room.
Engineering, Computer Science, Technical Sales and Business Administration students
and faculty are cordially invited to attend. Refreshments will be served. Don't miss this
opportunity to personally discuss careers in the dynamic high-technology electronics
environment of Harris Corporation. On campus interviews will be held on Thursday,
October 6th. Arrangements can be made at the Placement Office.
HARRIS CORPORATION TODAY:
Harris Corporation is at the leading edge of an exciting new era in the Information
Technology industry. Over the past 20 years we have developed an extensive line of
information processing and communication products which generate worldwide
annual sales of more than $1.4 billion. Harris is the largest electronics company
1. I. . L -L - 11C _"t-W\--....I- I- i.. Z k f aer n

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan