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September 29, 1983 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-09-29

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The Michian Daily - Thursday, September 29, 1983 - Page 5

i

AP Photo
Gone fishin'
A fisherman casts out his line into the Detroit River yesterday, while the early morning fog clears to reveal the Windsor
skyline on the opposite shore.icaivestm entstalled

Reagan:
China visit
won't hurt
Taiwanese
relations
WASHINGTON (UPI) - President
Reagan, who will travel to Peking next
April, now believes the status of Taiwan
is "a matter for the Chinese people" to
decide, his spokesman said yesterday.
Some 12 hours after Defense
Secretary Caspar Weinberger announ-
ced the Reagan visit in Peking, deputy
White House press secretary Larry
Speakes sought to remove the issue of
Taiwan as an obstacle to improved
U.S.-Sino relations.
"THE significance of the president's
decision" to make the trip after a visit
to the United States in January by
Chinese Premier Zhao Ziyang lies in his
commitment to "a strong relationship"
between the two countries," Speakes
said.
Reagan will be the first president to
visit China since Gerald Ford in 1975.
As a candidate, he was sharply
critical of normalization and the
resulting termination of diplomatic ties
with Taiwan.
"The Taiwan question," Speakes
said, "is a matter for the Chinese
people on both sides."
NOON LUNCHEON
HOME MADE SOUP
AND SANDWICH
$1.00
(Optional)
FRIDAY, SEPT. 30
"THE KLAN'S LEGACY
OF HATE"
(A Film)
at GUILD HOUSE
802 MONROE

(Continued from Page 1)
seven companies operating in the
Soviet Union. All seven of those com-
panies are included in the list of 37 in-
volved in South Africa.
The University technically is already
in violation of the statute, which
required divestment from the Soviet
Union by last February. (Divestment
from South Africa is not required until
April 1984.)
But Gerald Young, the state's
assistant attorney general, said the
state will not take any actions against
the University for violating the law un-

til the issue is resolved in court.
State Sen. Alan Cropsey (R-DeWitt),
who pushed through the amendment to
the Bullard legislation that added the
Soviet Union, said yesterday that he
has not followed up on the enforcement
of the legislation.
BUT HE SAID that with "the recent
action by the Soviets in shooting down
the Korean airliner," he would like to
"look into it more in the future."
On the issue of the delays in Univer-
sity divestment, Leonard Suransky, a
lecturer on Southern Africa and a
leader in the University's pro-
divestment movement since the 1970s,

said divestment proponents "should get
on (the University's) back a bit"
because no action seems to be taking
place. "But I think (the regents are)
committed to (divest) since they made
the resolution in April. So far they have
let four or five months go by without
doing anything when they are supposed
to be trying to get the best return on
their investments."
Suransky said it was "disturbing" to
him that the University could only iden-
tify five companies thus far that would
be affected by the divestment
resolution. "I hope the University is not
just trying to weasel out of it."

Negotiators back contract
(Continued from Page 1)

figures were available for the current'
level of financial aid.
"We put as much pressure as we
could to make the University take ac-
tion on the report," Ehrlich said.
The Unversity's chief negotiat
Colleen Dolan-Greene, said the
University's offer has nothing to do
with an attitude change; it is merely a
reflection of the state's healthier fiscal
conditions.
DOLAN-GREENE SAID an increase
in state funds this year gave the
Univarsity more flexibility in
bargaining.
"The University is putting a high
priority on support for graduate studen-
ts," Dolan-Greene said. "We want to at-
tract the best quality graduate studen-
ts."
She said lack of state funds in
previous years has put many priorities,
including TA salaries, on the "back
burner."
THIS YEAR THE University is slated
to receive $168 million in state aid - $19
million more than last year - said Bob
Sauve, assistant to the vice president
for academic affairs.
"We can afford to be optimistic
because we know what's happening
with the state's financial position,"
Sauve said.
But GEO members say teaching
assistants' salaries represent such a
small percentage of the University's
budget that "it's not nearly as impor-
tant as they make it to be," Ehrlich
said.

ABSENT FROM the accord is men-
tion of limiting class size and meeting
affirmative action goals, two GEO
requests throughout bargaining.
Instead, the University will recom-
mnend that individual departments
restrict class size, and said the union
has no right to ask for affirmative ac-
tion considerations.
"Affirmative action goals are bet-
ween the University and the federal
government," Dolan-Greene said, "not
between us and GEO or,,any other
union."
A SURVEY taken last February of
1,332 teaching assistants found that 5.6
percent were minorities and 41.2 per-
cent were women, said Gamble from
the personnel office.
Ehrlich said the union didn't have
enough bargaining power to push for af-
firmative action goals, but said it would
be a "primary issue" in future
negotiations.
The contract will run through March,
1985.
A key dispute between the two parties
in earlier negotiations was the length of
the contract: The University wanted a
three-year agreement while GEO
requested a shorter time.
TAs will work under their present
contract until September, 1984, when
the negotiated increases take effect.
Ehrlich said it's likely that GEO
members would approve the contract
when they vote next Wednesday.

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