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September 29, 1983 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-09-29

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Ninety-four Years
of
Editorial Freedom

I P

4an

iitai1t

Smashing
Late night fog lifting by
morning with a high today
80. . Low tonight in the 50s

mid-
near

F

Vol. XCIV- No. 19

Copyright 1983, The Michigan Daily

Ann Arbor, Michigan - Thursday, September 29, 1983

Fifteen Cents

Twelve Pages

-,--I

'U' works
to improve
'secondary
schools
By LAURIE DELATER
The University reaffirmed its comm-
itment to improving secondary
education in Michigan last week during
a series of meetings between 'Univer-
sity and high school officials from
around the state.
The informal meeting- held at
college campuses in Marquette,
Saginaw, and Detroit- were in respon-
se to recent studies calling for tougher,
standards in the nation's elementary
and secondary schools.
WHILE university administrators
said they would not tighten their ad-
missions requirements, they en-
}couraged high school officials to make
their programs more rigorous, said
University Admissions Director Cliff
Sjogren, who attended the meetings.
Michigan is one of five states that has
no minimum graduation requirements
- the standards are determined by
local school districts. This policy leads
some critics to think the quality of
See HOW, Page 9,

Negotiators

laud

GEO

eontraet

Say W hat? Daily Photo by TOD WOOLF
Ann Arbor Police Officer K. Michael says "no" to buses illegally parked outside Hill Auditorium. The vehicles brought
members of the German Armed Forces Staff Band to the area for a performance.

By BARBARA MISLE
Although their recently-negotiated
contract with the University gives
teaching assistants only a $179 net gain
for next year, negotiations for the
assistants' union said the agreement
marks a sharp shift in the University's
attitude toward the union. '
Negotiators for the Graduate Em-
ployees Organization (GEO) - the
assistants' union - and the University
settled the agreement Monday night.
The contract still must be ratified by
the GEO membership at a meeting Oct.
5.
THE CONTRACT provides a five
percent pay hike and a seven percent
reduction in tuition effective Septem-
ber, 1984, according to Abraham
Ehrlich, chief negotiator for the GEO.
Copies of the agreement were not
released, but University Personnel
Manager Dan Gamble said average
teaching assistant salaries would rise
by $117 dollars to $2,435 per term;
average tuition per term would drop $62
to $889.
While the contract falls short of many
assistants' hopes, GEO negotiator Bar-
bara Joos said it is a positive move.
"IT WOULD always be nice to get
more, but it's a step in the right direc-
tion. It's the first time the University
has recognized tuition has a significant

impact on our income," she said.
"I don't know why the University
elected to bargain for real this time,"
Joos added.
GEO members said the agreement is
an abrupt shift in University policy
toward the union. Negotiations between
the University and GEO have brought
pickets, a court order forcing the
University to recognize the GEO, and
months of unsuccessful bargaining.
EHRLICH said fear of a possible
strike might have prodded the Univer-
sity into settling. "There was grass
roots support for a possible strike,"
Ehrlich said, adding that several TAs
considered transferring to schools with
more lucrative assistants' programs.
He also said a report by a University
faculty committee which recommen-
ded raising TA's salaries and cutting
their tuition was '.instrumental"
toward progress on the contract.
The report, released by the Office of
Academic Affairs, recommended that
TAs receive a full tuition waiver and
that 10 percent of the University's
general fund be allocated to teaching
assistants' salaries and financial aid.
TAs. CURRENTLY pay about two-
thirds of in-state tuition and receive
about $8 million (.026 percent) for
salaries from the general fund. No

6 U,

waits on divestment

By JACKIE YOUNG
When the regents resolved last April
to sell the University's investments in
companies that operate in racially
,segregated South Africa, campus
protest over the issue faded into the
background. But five months have
passed since the vote, and the Univer-
sity has yet to implement its new
divestment policy, University officials
say.
In April the regents voted to divest of
what was then estimated as 90 percent
of the University's financial holdings in
companies operating in South Africa,
which is governed on a system of apar-
theid. The remaining. 10 percent is
made up of companies the regents ex-
cluded from their directive - com-
panies which are headquartered in
Michigan and those companies that
employ substantial numbers of em-
ployees in the state.
THE UNIVERSITY has not been able
to apply the divestment policy thus far
because of difficulties in identifying the
companies that should be excluded,
said Norman Herbert, the University's
finvestment officer. Herbert said he is
still waiting on information from the

Michigan Department of Commerce
and the Michigan Employment
Securities Commission.
Herbert also said that divestment will
not involve 90 percent of University

invests that operate in South Africa.
Some stocks have been sold, Herbert
said, but only for financial reasons.
Stock from four of those companies
will not be sold because of an additional

'I hope the University is not just trying to weasel
out of (divestment).'
- Leonard Suransky
divestment activist

their holdings from companies
operating in South Africa and the Soviet
Union. The legislation, originally spon-
sored by Rep. Perry Bullard (D - Ann
Arbor), was signed into law late last
year.
THE SUIT, FILED July 15 in Ingham
County Circuit Court, challenges the
constitutionality of the law, which the
University alleges takes away the
regents' control over University funds.
The legislation is an "uncon-
stitutional intrusion upon the powers
and authority of the regents to direct
expenditures of the University's fun-
ds," the suit states.
University General Counsel Roderick
Daane said that he is "woefully behind"
in preparing the summary judgments
which will elaborate on the University's
position and a date has not been set for
the trial.
ACCORDING TO the papers Daane
filed in July, the University had $51
million invested in 37 corporations
doing business in South Africa as of
June 30.
The papers filed also show that the
University has $17 million invested in
See S. AFRICAN, Pa e 5

See NEGOTIATORS, Page 5

stocks in companies' operations in
South Africa. "Until we know the status
of those companies, we can't determine
the percentage of investments in South
Africa," Herbert said.
"We are getting closer to getting the
reliable information," Herbert said.
"But we don't have a definitive date set
yet. We are dependent on the outside
agencies."
AS OF AUG. 30, Herbert said there
were 33 companies in which the University

exclusion in the regents directive,
which says that the University need not
sell stocks it has received as gifts. Her-
bert said he is certain of only five com-
panies from which the University will
divest.
That leaves questions surrounding 24
of the companies, Herbert said.
At the same April meeting, the regen-
ts also decided to sue the state over
legislation intended to force state
educational institutions to divest all

r

Ma
yeste
the I
Wash
outco
"Th
huma

Andropov regrets jet tragedy
)SCOW (UPI) - President Yuri Andropov spoke out others is turning into new heaps of weapons of mass destruc-
rday for the first time on the downed Korean jet, saying tion from MX missiles to nerve gas containers," Andropov
{remlin regrets the loss of human lives and charging said.
ington is "rubbing their hands with pleasure" at the The Soviet leader said the "sophisticated provocation
)me. masterminded by U.S. special services with the use of a
he Soviet leadership expressed regret over the loss of South Korean plane, is also an example of extreme adven-
an lives due to that unprecedented, criminal subver- turism in politics."

sion," Andropov said in a tough statement read on the nightly
television news.
THE SOVIET Union has charged that Korean Air Lines
Flight 007 was on a spy mission for the United States, but
Washington has denied the allegation.
"It is on the conscience of those who would like to assume
the right not to reckon with the sovereignty of states and in-
violability of their borders, who masterminded and carried
out the provocation, who literally on the following day hastily
pushed through Congress colossal military spending and are
now rubbing their hands with pleasure," he said.
Andropov "The humanism of statesmen who are seeking to lay the
.. denies allegations blame for the death of people that were aboard the plane on

ANDROPOV'S statement was similar to previous Soviet
remarks, but it was the first response from the Soviet leader
himself to the deaths of 269 people when the Korean Air Lines
747 was blasted out of the sky Sept. 1 by Soviet jet.
The Soviet president, who has not made a public appearan-
ce since mid-August, criticized the U.S. position at the
Geneva talks on medium-range nuclear missiles.
He charged that Washington does not seek an accord at
Geneva, but is playing for time so it can deploy Pershing-2 and
cruise nuclear missiles in Western Europe.
Andropov made no direct response to President Reagan's
latest arms proposal.

AP Photo
Pro-lifers protest
About 4,000 anti-abortionists converged outside the state capitol in Lansing
yesterday. Their efforts were aimed at passage of a Michigan House bill
which bans Medicaid payments for abortions. See story, Page 3.

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TODAY
Back-seat birthing
(ALEANA BLEVINS is no back-seat driver - she's

Mrs. Blevins' third child made it into the maternity ward
before being born. "The new baby was wriggling all over
the place and screaming bloody murder," Mrs. Barefoot
said. "It was all I could do to hang onto her. It was nothing
LIKE April." Mother and baby were cleaned up in the St.
John's emergency room, then taken to West Shore Hospital
in Westlake, Ohio. Ql

frustrating. Humane Society rescue workers couldn't lure
the kitten into a trap lowered into the recesses of the con-
crete pit. Kit. also spurned a pail dropped to the bottom of
the pit and a rope made of bed sheets, which rescuers hoped
she would climb up.ThenBryant had an idea.He fastened a
long rope to a cardboard box that contained a can of
mackerel, dropped his bait into the hole and, after a few
minutes, hauled in his scared but unharmed catch. Ql

" 1972 - District Court Judge Sandorf Elden voided the
five-dollar provision of Ann Arbor's marijuana ordinance,
and replaced it with a maximum penalty of 90 days in jail
and/or a $100 fine.
"-1977 - West Quad residents throwing ice cream cones
out their windows were blamed for a three-car accident at
the corner of Thompson St. and E. Madison. "This happens
every year," said the police officer at the scene. "I wish
they'd stop serving those West Quad residents ice cream
cones.

r ,.,. . r.... .._ .. i

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