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September 08, 1983 - Image 37

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-09-08

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The Michigan Daily - Thursday, September 8, 1983 - Page 5-B
Blacks fear budget priorities ignore them

By JACKIE YOUNG
Concern is growing among minority leaders
that as money becomes increasingly scarce at
the University, they will be unwittingly
squeezed out by the budget cutting process.
They fear that affirmative action goals will
be forgotten in the University's fight for finan-
cial survival, that schools and colleges will
have enrollments slashed without considering
the effects on minorities, and that minority
professors will be layed off first because they
lack seniority.
DEEP CUTS IN the University's state sup-
port have forced administrators to begin a five-
year long budget cutting plan. Every school,
unit, and department has had to cut back.
Three schools have been slated for major cuts,
ranging from 25 to 40 percent of their budgets.
Until recently, the University community has
viewed afirmative action, and declining state
support as separate problems. But slowly, over
the last year, minority leaders have watched
the two come together.
Much of the concern is centered on proposed
cuts to the School of Education, the unit with
the highest percentage of blacks and minorities
at the University. But the concern has now
broadened to encompass the whole budget cut-
ting process.
THIS SPRING the University's top budget
committee, after an extensive program
',review, recommended that the education
.school reduce its budget by 40 percent, cut total
-enrollment from 875 to 500 students, and nearly
eliminate undergraduate programs.
A report, which the committee adopted, says
the proposed cuts "could have a significant im-
pact on the University's capacity to maintain
its commitment to the enrollment of minority
students."
The report states that the losses of minority
students would not be "trivial".
The school could lose as many as 130
minority students if the cuts are adopted, the
report said.
THE REPORT ALSO expressed concern
about how the cuts would affect minority
faculty members.
"Depending on how the proposed reductions
are carried out... minority faculty could bear a

'An institution has to be
sensitive to minority con-
cerns...more sensitivity is
needed throughout the
review process. Unless the
University makes the
decision that the cuts won't
affect minority enrollment
and faculty, they will.'
- Eunice Royster, chair-
woman of the council for
minority concerns.

'You don't make,
to cut a school

a decision
based on

how many woman and
black students are in those
schools. It is inappropriate
to put academic con-
siderations second to those
of affirmative action.
-Billy Frye, vice president
for academic affairs and
provost.

disproportionate share of the reductions," the
report said.
Although many of the affected minority
students are also enrolled in LSA and may not
leave the University,minority leaders have
seen the proposed cuts as a major threat to the
University's diversity.
Last June, a 21-member Council for Minority
Concerns took action on their concerns. In a
preliminary draft of a report to the Advisory
Committee on Affirmative Action Programs,
the council said the proposed cuts to the
education school would "constitute a major
setback to the University and minority com-
munities."
THE GROUP ESTIMATED that the Univer-
sity's minority enrollment would drop by 93
students if the proposed cuts are carried out.
Beyond the short-term enrollment concerns,
some campus leaders feel the University is
shirking its responsibility to minorities by

eliminating programs minorities are attracted
to.
"Any curicular change that reduces the
chances for minorities is not a good thing,"
says Joan Stark, the dean of the education
school. "The University should want to do
things to help women and minorities as well as
other students succeed at the University."
SHE SAYS the education school has had suc-
cess recruiting minorities because many are
attracted to education.
In effect, the University is telling the school's
many minorities that they can go somewhere
else if they want to go the University, she says.
Two other major schools targeted for budget
cuts, the Schools of Art and Natural Resources,
have the lowest percentage of minorities at the
University. But some minority leaders say af-
firmative action goals will be even less of a
priority in those schools,,because of the small.
number of minorities.
WILLIAM LEWIS, A spokesperson for the
art school, says it is hard to predict how
minority enrollments would be affected by the
proposed 25 percent budget cut for the school,
but the school is "going to have some trouble."

"I don't see how we can avoid it," he says.
"It they are going to cut the school by 25 per-
cent, then it would reduce the total enrollment
from 580 students to approximately 300."
"Many of the new faculty people are
minorities who are going to be eliminated if the
cuts go through. How can you avoid it?" he
says.
"SMALLER BUT BETTER" is the catch-
word administrators are using to promote their
budget cutting program. But Eunice Royster,
the chairwoman of the Council for Minority
Concerns, says the cuts may result in a
"smaller but bitter" University for minorities.
'IAn institution has to be sensitive to minority
concerns," says Royster, "for then it has a
greater potential to be sensitive to other
(majority) students... More sensitivity is
needed throughout the review process."
"Unless the University makes'the decision
that the cuts won't affect minority enrollment
and faculty, they will," she says.
AS A BLACK PROFESSOR in the School of
Education, Murrey Jackson has become
especially aware of the dangers budget cutting
presents to minority students.

"If black students are in the programs which
are cut, then they are going to be affected," he
says. "If financial aid which the University
receives is cut, then black students will be af-
fected. If the amount of funds allocated to
recruit black students is reduced, then they will
be affected."
Niara Sudarkasa, director of the Center for
Afroamerican and African studies, says she
wants to see more than just sensitivity towards
blacks in the review process. She says the
University needs to set up a committee to en-
sure that minority concerns are addressed as
budgets are cut.
"The University should designate a special
group of people to ensure that as the University
gets smaller it continues to 'support its com-
mitment to blacks and minorities," she says.
See MINORITIES, Page 19

Colorful landmarks dot campus

By HALLE CZECHOWSKI
Mostsuniversities have thesame
basic set up, libraries, classrooms
courtyards, and hallowed buildings.
Yet, each campus has landmarks that
set the school apart from any other. The
University is set farther apart than
most.
Burton Tower is one such landmark.
It is difficult to miss the tower, as it lor-
ds over campus.
DEDICATED IN 1936, the tower
houses the world's third largest
carillon, and 67 bells altogether. It is
the only carillon in the world to feature
the entire bell range. All the bells were
cast in Loughborough, England.
Every fifteen minutes the bells
chime, and on the hour the carilloneur
plays one of his favorite musical selec-
tions. Listening for the bells is one way
to stay awake in particularly boring
classes.
The heighth and prominance of the
tower seems to spawn several suicide
rumors each year. At least one person
on your dorm hall will swear to have
seen the tower blocked off and the
outline of a body obscured by onlokers.

But none of the rumors has ever been
documented.
ON STATE STREET stands a blue
sign that reads "The Kelsey Museum of
Archaelogy." The stone lettering on the
building the sign denotes, however,
says "Newberry Hall."
Built in 1890 by the Student's
Christian Association, the building was
named after Helen Newberry, who had
donated the money for the project. The
Building became University property
in 1937 and was re-named Kelsey
when the organization floundered.
TODAY THE MUSEUM houses more
than 100,000 ancient artifacts, and is
used for special exhibits, and as
classroom space for the art history
department.
A little farther down State Street on
the corner of Catherine stands another
locally famous building, the Purple
House, also known as Minnie's Co-op.
Ann Arbor lore says the house was
sorely in need of a coat of paint in 1970
when it was purchased by a group of
hippies.
WHEN THE HIPPIES went to a
nearby paint store and asked for 1,500

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the only color in stock was purple. They
took it.
The house was purchased in 1973 by
the Inter Co-operative Council, and the
members have taken steps to protect
the outspoken paint job. By house con-
stitutional amendment, the members
declared that it remain purple unless
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THE UNIVERSITY'S favorite lan-
dmark is probably the giantrotating
cube in the center of Regents Plaza.
The cube was installed in 1968 after
being donated by the graduating class
of 1965 and sculpter Bernard Rosenthal,
a 1936 art school alumnus.
The basic layout may be the same,
ivy covered buildings, a student center
and lots of trees, but Michigan's lan-
dmarks set it apart as a one-of-a-kind
University.

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