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September 27, 1983 - Image 11

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-09-27

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The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, September 27, 1983 - page 11

'M' Weekend Wrap-up

~Lady golfers
take I10th in
MSU tourney
By MIKE BERRES
The competition was better, the golf
course was tougher, and the Michigan
women's golf team was not up to the
task, as they finished 10th in a field of 15
at the Spartan Falls Invitational, held
qver the weekend in East Lansing.

two spot, eventually finishing in that
order. Minnesota's Nancy Harris took
medalist honors shooting 223 for the 54
hole tournament. She opened the event
by posting the best round of the tour-
ney, a71.
Cheryl Stacy of Ohio State finished
second with 225. Michigan State's Barb
Teichert, who won the Lady Wolverine
Invitational last weekend, shot 227
which was good for third place.
MICHIGAN WAS led by Melissa
Bauer with a 241. That was low enough
for a tie for 15th place overall. The
Wolverines rallied on the last day to
move from 13th to their 10th place
finish in the tournament.

Spikers split
in weekend
matches
By JIM DAVIS
Sometimes you got it, sometimes you
don't.
Friday night, the Wolverines
volleyball squad had it, downing Illinois
on the road. But Saturday it was a dif-
ferent story, as Purdue lowered the
boom on Michigan.
THE SPIKERS, who have started
slowly in most matches before coming
on strong, defeated the Illini at Cham-'
paign 11-15, 15-9, 5-15, 16-14, and 15-9.
The win was the first in the Big Ten for
Michigan, who now stand 10-3 overall.
Purdue, however, blasted the
Wolverines at WestrLafayette. The
Boilermakers, one of the top teams in
the conference, got off to a quck start
and coasted to a 15-1, 15-4, 15-12 drub-
bing of Michigan.

"We hoped to at least come away
(from the road trip) with a split," said
assistant coach Barb Canning. The
spikers did manage to do that, but Can-
ning was not pleased.
"Our play has not been consistent,"
continued Canning, who pointed out the
Wolverine players are prone to streaks
of excellent play.
"IT WAS NICE to win a road match
at Illinois, but we never really got star-
ted at Purdue. They've been touted as
the best team in the Big Ten."
Senior Jeanne Weckler, who earlier
suffered a secondary knee sprain,
returned to the starting lineup for the
Wolverines in the two matches. The
Northbrook, Illinois native, one of the
team's top defensive players and a
regular at setter, shifted to hitter for
the weekend.
The Wolverines next match is tonight
at the CCRB against Eastern Michigan.
"We're looking to establish a con-
sistent game against Eastern." said
Canning, who described the Hurons as a
"scrappy" team.

Michigan coach Sue LeClair,
however, was happy with the scores of Along with
her squad. "We had an 85.7 average, Syron shot 25
which is what we wanted, but after the Wolverine
seeing the competition, I guess it wasn't Sally Barron
good enough." DiMatteo shot
OHIO STATE won the tournament had a 278.
with a team total of 926. They had held a
small lead after the first 36 holes, which The Michigz
were played on Friday. Then the Iowa City for
Buckeyes pulled away on the final day. collegiate Tou
Minnesota, Illinois State, and the host Saturday.
Spartans fought it out for the number
MEN WIN FIFTH STRAIGH T:

Bauer's 241, Bridget
57, Val Madill, who led
es last week, had a 259,
was next at 266, Lisa
272, and Luanne Cherney
an women now travel to
the Lady Northern Inter-
urnament on Friday and

AP Photo

0 h
Women harriers get surprised

The foreign challenger Australia II nipped Liberty, the American entry, to
win the America's Cup yesterday in Newport, R.I. ending 132 years of sailing
dominance by the United States. (See story on page 9)

By MIKE REDSTONE
"We were shellacked," said women's
cross country coach Francie Goodridge
after Sunday's Midwest Collegiate race
at Kenosha, Wis.
This comment may be surprising to
some, considering the women harriers
finished sixth out of 30 teams with a
total score of 195 points.
AFTER TWO weeks of intensive
stress training, Goodridge expected her
runners to perform better. Michigan's
top runner, Sue Schroeder, finished 18th
overall.
Goodridge was surprised by the
strength of some of the teams that
finished ahead of the Wolverines."Pur-
due (second) and Northwestern (third)
showed a lot of improvement over last
year," she said. "Neither team
graduated as many of its top runners as
we did."
The surprise runner of the meet for
the Wolverines was Sophomore Kelly
Bert, according to Goodridge.
I COMING OFF an injury, which
sidelined her for all of last year, Bert

finished second for the Wolverines and
40th overall in her first college meet.
Goodridge has become less optimistic

about finishing in the top two places at
the Midwest region meet and returning
to the NCAA meet for the second
straight year.
"I've seen a lot of strength in the
region where I didn't expect to see it,"
said Goodridge.
Iowa State, which is not in Michigan's
region, finished the meet first overall
with a low total of 45 points.
Men win Springbank
The men's cross country team star-
ted its 1983 season off on the right foot
Sunday by winning the Springbank
Road Race in London, Ontario.
Despite the absence of All-America
Brian Diemer who skipped the event,
the Maize and Blue harriers were able
to turn in a solid team effort to suc-
cessfully defend their reign over the
prestigious Canadian event for the fifth
straight year.
EIGHT WOLVERINE RUNNERS
finished among the top 13 places to
score a low team total of 18 points.
Leading the way was junior Dave

Goodridge
... surprising competition

Boilermakers shut out Blue

Meyer who sprinted the 4.3-mile course
in 19:58, to finish in fourth place
overall. Dennis Keane was not far
behind turning in a time of 20:06, which
placed sixth.
Doug Heikkinen (eighth), John
Chambers (ninth), Jeff Costello (tenth)
and Bill Brady (eleventh) finished with
times between 20:20-20:30.
MICHIGAN SOPHOMORE Chris
Brewster, the defending champ, could
not match his performancehoflast year
and had to settle for a twelfth-place
finishing time of 20:35.
The next competition for coach Ron
Warhurst's harriers is October 8 when
the squad is scheduled to take part in
the Lehigh Invitational in Lehigh,
Penn.
- Joe Bower
GRIDDE PICKS
Stormin' Norm Jacobi has earned a
free pizza from Pizza Bob's. You see
Norm was crazy enough to pick
Nebraska Omaha over Morningside to
win last week's Griddes. Everyone
knows, well almost everyone, that
Nebraska couldn't have two good foot-
ball teams. There aren't enough people
in Nebraska for two teams.
Well, today's the start of another
Griddes week and for all those who are
interested, drop off your picks
either at the Daily on 420 Maynard St.,
Pizza Bob's on State St., or Pizza Bob's
Midtown. Deadline is midnight Friday.
1. Indiana vs MICHIGAN (pick score)
2. Iowa vs Illinois
3. Michigan St. vs Purdue
4. Minnesota vs Ohio St.
5. Wisconsin vs Northwestern
6. North Carolina vs Georgia Tech
7. Southern Cal vs. South Carolina
8. Vanderbilt vs Tulane
9. Virginia vs Maryland
10. Florida St. vs Auburn
11. Stanford vs Arizona St.
12. Army vs Harvard
13. Brigham Young vs UCLA
14. Eastern Carolina vs Missouri
15. Florida vs LSU
16. Oregon St. vs Colorado
17. Boston U..vs Colgate
18. Norwich vs. Coast Guard
19. Mankato St. vs Augustana
20. Indiana Panty Hosers vs Daily
Libels
SCORES
Baseball
Philadelphia 5 Chicago 2
Atlanta 6 San Francisco 2

Forsch no-hits Expos

ST. LOUIS (AP) - Bob Forsch pit-
ched the second no-hitter of his career
and the first in the National League in
exactly two years driving the St. Louis
Cardinals to a 3-0 victory over the Mon-
treal Expos Monday night.
The Expos, who were
mathematically eliminated' from the
NL East pennant race Monday after-
noon when Philadelphia beat Chicago 5-
2, came close to getting a hit only once.
RENT A
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5

r

{.-1 7)u

, t.

By PAULA SCHIPPER
The field hockey team was emotionally up for the game as
they shouted "number fifty, this one's for you!" But coach
Candy Zientek did not get her 50th win, yesterday, against
Purdue at Ferry Field.
Michigan was beaten, 1-0, when Boilermaker Nancy
Powell intercepted a hard pass from Wolverine goalie Jonnie
Terry in the second half.
"SHE (TERRY) was in good position but gave an inch and
went in," said assistant coach Karen Collins.
Terry made eight saves, including a goal-saving lunge,
across the net. Sweeper Bridget Sickon also made a defen-
sive save in the second half.
The loss puts Michigan's record at 1-2, but the team may
have lost something more than just the game.
CO-CAPTAIN halfback Denise Comby slipped in the first
half possibly fracturing her left shin. That could leave a
serious hole in the defense, but Michigan shuffled positions
and managed to hold on for the half. The severity of Comby's
injury is not yet known.
"Our defense was a little messed up but we held together

good and strong," said Collins. "Purdue just took advantage
of its one opportunity."
Powell, who notched her third goal of the season, thought
the Boilermakers could have played better. "We're capable
of playing much stronger. We haven't reached out potential
in mid-field."
PURDUE COACH Nancy Cross wasn't very enthusiastic
either. "We are capable of getting the shot and forcing the
corner. I just don't think our shooting percentage is terrific."
Michigan's percentage was not anything to boast about
either as they failed to capitalize on eight attempts at the
goal. There were admirable performances - by Lisa
Schofield who had three shots on goal, and Kay McCarthy
who nearly scored twice.
Coach Zientek tested the team by playing freshmen Joan
Taylor and Jane Nixon as forward and link, respectively. We
worked as a team - with communication. That's what we
wanted to accomplish and I was happy."
Zientek will be happier if she can reach her milestone vic-
tory at Michigan when the Wolverines face off against host
Toledo, today.

i1hing p p' nS 9

ANN ARBOR
POPCORN CO.

UNION
Ist floor

/ ,-
W . _ . . . . , t . . . _ . . _ . . _ _ . . . . . . . . m
~

L ajoe
replaces
Campbell

DETROIT (AP) - Bill Lajoie, who
had been vice president in charge of
Detroit's minor league baseball
organization, was named general
manager of the Tigers yesterday
replacing Jim Campbell, who stepped
down to become chief executive officer.
Campbell, who will be 60 in February,
has been the Tiger general manager for
21 years. Lajoie, who will be 49
Tuesday, said that no one has been
chosen yet to take over his minor
league duties.
Lajoie joined the Tigers as a scout in
1968 and under his guidance, Detroit
developed one of the most productive
farm systems in baseball, with such

bright products as Alan Trammell, Lou
Whitaker, Jack Morris and Lance
Parrish. He also was credited with
helping the Tigers acquire such stan-
douts as Chet Lemmon and Larry Her-
ndon through trades.
In 1978, Lajoie was named a vice
president and director of player
procurement.

Registration begins September 19
Classes begin October 3
University Artist and Craftsmen Guild
Calligraphy Acrylic Painting

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200 outstanding works by these and other artists

Drawing 1&2
Bookbinding
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Drawing on Right Side
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