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September 27, 1983 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-09-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Volleyball
Michigan vs. Eastern Michigan
7:00 p.m., CCRB
he Michigan Daily

SPORTS
Tuesday, September 27, 1983

Field Hockey
Michigan vs. Toledo
at Toledo, 4:00 p.m.

Page 9

Michigan Grid Statistics

'U

coach sings the

blues

TEAM

Passing

....

Total First Downs .
Rushing .........
Passing .........
Penalty .......
Total Net Yards ..
Total Plays ......
Avg. Per Play ...
Avg. Per Game..
Net Rushing Yards
Total Attempts.
Avg: Per Play ...
Avg. Per Game..
Net Passing Yards.
Att/Comp/Int ...
Avg. Per Att....
Avg. Per Comp. .
Avg. Per Game..
Punt/Yds/Avg.....
Punt Ret./Yds/Avg
KO Ret/Yds/Avg..
Int/Yds/Avg ......
Fumbles/Lost .....
Penalties/Yds .....
Scoring:
Total Pts/Avg
Touchdowns ....
Rushing .......
Passing .......
Other .......
PATK/Att .
2 pt Conv/At ....
Field Goals/Att..
Third Dn. Conv/Att
Success Pct......

M
65
43
19
3
1109
215
5.1
369.7
792
160
4.9
264.0
317
55/31/3
5.8
10.2
105.7
11/412/37.4
6/43/7.2
6/88/14.7
3/35/11.7
3/1
20/161
82/27.3
11
8
2
7/10
0/1
3/4
20/44
.454

Opp
52
27
22
3
832
188
4.4
277.3
324
104
3.1
108.0
508
84/50/3
6.0
10.2
169.3
12/478/39.8
3/18/6.0
8/ 12!4/15.5
3/109/36.3
5/4
14/109
63/21.0
8
3
4
7/7
1/1
2/3
16/39
.410

PA
S. Smith 41
Hall ........14

PC
23
8
31
50

Int
2
1
3
3

Pct TD
.561 1
.571 1

By RON POLLACK

MICHIGAN
Opponents .

55
84

Nelson ........
Rogers ........
Bean ........
Armstrong
K. Smith ......
G. Johnson ....
Garrett........
MICHIGAN ...
Opponents .....

Receiving
No
............. 12
............ 7
3
............ 2
............ 1
1
............. 31
............ 54
8050
Scoring
Dr TDp TDo
4
11
1 -
1
1

Indiana head football coach Sam Wyche is lowering
.54 2 the boom on his squad as it prepares for next Satur-
day's game against Michigan.
The Hoosiers lost to Northwestern, 10-8, to lower its
Yds Avg record to 1-2, on Saturday, and Wyche minced no
137 11.4 words yesterday about his dissatisfaction with his
38 5.4
88 17.6 team.
13 4.3 "WE PLAYED a sorry football game," Wyche
23 11.5 said. "I congratulate Northwestern for winning, but
12 12.0
6 6.0 they aren't a very good football team and they beat
us. We are better than Northwestern. Our ball club
317 10.2 was totally apathetic. They had no emotion. I called
508 10.2 on all my coaching resources - from coaching to
yelling to embarrassing - and it just didn't help.
PAK TP So we don't have to worry about that happening again
24 because we won't be favored again. We're certainly
6-8 9 not as good as Michigan."
1-2 7 As biting as these words were, Wyche was only
6 warming up. He then ripped into his squad with a
6
6 bluntness that is rarely heard from a coach.
6 "I KNOW THAT we are completely disappointed in
6 the team," Wyche said. "We have a 'loser' per-
6 sonality on this team . . . I thought we were further
along. I'm embarrassed for the university. We played
7-10 82 down to the worst level we could. So we can get bet-
7-7 63 ter.

"The telling thing is you can have a few rotten ap-
ples who can destroy the fiber of a team. My problem
was thinking I could change them. You can upgrade
them from bad to better, but not past mediocre."
With this in mind, Wyche has begun to weed out the
riff-raff.
HE ASKED THREE players to leave the team
during spring practices, dismissed another player
from the team Sunday and said yesterday that "there
are at least three more I've earmarked for the next 14
days.
"There are some fair weather fans and bandwagon
riders that already jumped off," Wyche said.
"They're out, ready to criticize. And some of them
happen to be on the club, that's the unfortunate part.
We've got to find them."
None of the players already dismissed, or those on
their way out, are starters.
"Usually the starters have more pride," Wyche
said.
THE FIRST-YEAR Hoosier coach admitted that
his methods since taking over the Indiana coaching
duties have been tough, but argued that they have not
been unreasonable.
"It could be that I've asked too much of a college
athlete too fast," Wyche said. "But as I look at it, my
opinion is they could and should handle everything"
we've asked," Wyche said.

Wyche's verbal castigation of his team came as a
surprise to Michigan head coach Bo Schembechler. -
"I DON'T SEE quite what he's talking about in the
Northwestern game," Schembechler said. "Maybe
he knows something I don't. I'm sure he does. But
that was a tight game. You must not make the
mistake of thinking Northwestern doesn't have good
players. Those are two teams that just went after,7
each other. I don't see what he's talking about.
"I didn't see loafing. Maybe it's there, but I didn't
see it. They didn't look bad to me."
Then Schembechler offered a possible explanation
for Wyche's heated outburst.
"I'll tell you men, you get mad when you lose," he
said. "It's no fun."
INJURY UPDATE: Indiana's Duane Gunn, an All-
America wide reciever candidate, has only a 10-
percent chance of playing against Michigan accor-
ding to Wyche.
"Duane bruised everything but 'his lower lip,"
Wyche said. "He's walking around like an old man."
Michigan tailback Rick Rogers suffered a bruised
thigh against Wisconsin on Saturday and was expec-
ted not to practice yesterday. Schembechler said,
however, Rogers will probably practice today.
Running back Gerald White's knee injury appears
to have mended well enough to scrimmage, accor-
ding to Schembechler.

Rogers ....
Schiopy.
Bergeron ..
Hall .......
S. Smith ...
Mercer ..
Rice....
Garrett....
Nelson ....
Mallory ...
MICHIGAN
Opponents .
TDr-Rush

TC
4
i
i
i
i
i

8 2
3 4
TDp-Pass

1
1
TD

O-Other

INDIVIDUAL

Rushing
s Att
.ogers ....... .
K. Smith................. 36
S. Smith. ................. 16
Mercer .................. 16
Garrett ................. 15
Rice ...................... 12
Hall ...................... 6
Armstrong ................ 7
S.Johnson ................ 1
MICHIGAN............... 160
Opponents..............104

Yds
253
181
99
83
71
56
21
19
9
792
334

Avg
5.0
5.0
6.2
5.2
4.7
4.7
3.5
2.7
9.0
4.9
3.2

Punting
No Yds Avg
Bracken... 11 412 37.4
MICHIGAN 11 412 37.4

Long
52
52

Field Goals
30-39 40-49 50 +
Bergeron ..........41-1 1-1
Schloppy ...........1-2

Tot
2-2
1-2
3-4
2-3

MICHIGAN........2-3
Opponents ......... 2-3

1-1

USA fall

Don't Let a Bad Break
Disrupt Your College Budget
Whether it's an intramural football injury or a surprise attack of appendicitis,
an unanticipated sickness or accident can result in large medical bills.
And if you're like most college students, your budget doesn't allow for any
"bad breaks."
That's why it's a good idea to help protect yourself against the medical
expenses of an unexpected sickness or accident by enrolling now in the
1983-1984 Accident and Sickness Insurance Plan, approved by the MSA for
University of Michigan students and their dependents.
Underwritten by Mutual of Omaha, this plan provides hospital-surgical
protection for covered sickness and accidents - plus benefits for X-rays,
lab tests, ambulance and even major medical expenses.
If you haven't already reviewed the plan description mailed to you, you owe
it to yourself to do so now. Brochures describing the benefits, costs and
conditions of coverage are available at the Student Insurance Information
Center, Room 354, University Health Service, 207 Fletcher Ave.,
Ann Arbor, MI.
But don't wait. The plan's initial enrollment period ends September 24, 1983.

2
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UNMRWRiTTEN 81 ..
MUtUd
gQmdh&
People quo can count on...
MUTUAL Of OMAHA INSURANCE (OiPANV
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'Austmla
NEWPORT, R.I. (AP) -Australia II
won the America's cup yesterday, shat-
tering 132 years of U.S. supremacy with
sturining comeback victory over
iberty in the most dramatic finish
ever for sailing's most prestigious
prize.
The 41-second victory, the fourth-
closest in Cup history, brought to an end
the, longest winning streak in sports
history.
THE-CUP, first won by the schooner
American in 1851 and defended 25 times
since, was the only international
trophy never to change hands.
Now it belongs to the Australians,
ho ended 21 years of frustration
covering six previous challenges by
taking advantage of a crucial mistake
by American skipper Dennis Conner to
win the unprecedented seventh and
decisive race.
The victory triggered wild
celebrations among Aussie supporters
in the spectator fleet on Rhode Island
Sound, on the docks and streets of
ewport and Down Under, where
illions stayed up most of the-night to
watch it on television.
IT ALSO climaxed a determined
comeback by skipper John Bertrand
and his crew, who fell behind 3-1 and
then won three straight races, the last
one marking the first time a Cup series

wins CUP
had gone as far as seven races.
They appeared out of it Monday, as
well.
Liberty, with Conner reading the
winds correctly, held a seemingly safe
57-second lead after the fourth of six
legs on the 24.3-mile course on Rhode
Island Sound.
BUT THERE were nine miles to go,
and the Aussies wouldn't quit.
Bertrand found a wind shift of his
own, while Conner let the Australians
get unobstructed air.
The. American lead - and the
America's Cup - was gone.
AUSTRALIA II had outrun Liberty
by 1 minute, 18 seconds in the 4.5-mile
downwind leg and turned homeward in-
to the wind 21 seconds ahead.
All that was left was for the 37-year
Bertrand, a sailmaker from Melbourne
with a degree in ocean engineering
from Massachusetts Institute of
Technology, to keep in front of Conner
and block the wind coming into Liber-
ty's sails. He had lost the lead by not
doing that early in the race, but he
didn't repeat his mistake.
The Australians now are expected to
defend the Cup against the United
States and other countries in 1986.
And it will be in Perth, Australia,
12,500 miles around the world, not in
Newport for the first time since 1930.

5

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