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September 27, 1983 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-09-27

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Page 6 - The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, September 27, 1983
Soviets return items,
documents from plane

NEVELISK, U.S.S.R. - Soviet of-
ficials gave a U.S.-Japanese delegation
five crates of fuel-soaked clothes and
other debris but no bodies from the
downed South Korean jetliner yester-
day, leaving the visitors disappointed
and suspicious.
"I was not surprised by the meager-
ness. I tended to think it would be like
that," said one of the Americans,
characterizing the 76 items returned in
the four-hour meeting. The Soviets
claimed they surrendered all they had
found.
A SOVIET JET fighter shot down
Korean Air Lines flight 007 on Sept. $
over Sakhalin Island, killing all 269
people aboard including 61 Americans.
The material did not include any
bodies of the 269 people who were killed
nor the plane's flight recorder, the so-
called "black box" that records cockpit
conversation and other flight infor-
mation.
There were 61 Americans aboard
KAL Flight 007, which was knocked out
of the sky by air-to-air missiles when it
strayed into Soviet airspace near Japan
on Sept. 1.
THE SOVIETS turned over only those
articles they found floating on the sur-
face of the sea or washed up on the
shores of Moneron or Sakhalin islands,
said the U.S. official, who declined to be
identified.
He said he asked the Soviets about
submerged wreckage reportedly

retrieved by their search ships west of
Sakhalin and they responded, "All we
have to discuss is the stuff floating on
the surface."
The items included seven pairs of
pants and a suit coat soaked in kerosene
jet fuel, five battered oxygen bottles,
six brown seat cushions, a tattered
orange liferaft and pieces of metal, ap-
parently from an engine casing.
AMONG FOUR bundles of surren-
dered "documents" were a South
Korean newspaper, a Boeing 747
technical manual, what appeared to be
a business contract and an application
for a masters course at Japan's
Tsukuba University.
Heading the Soviet delegation was
Maj. Gen. A.I. Romanenko, chief of the
Soviet border forces for the Sakhalin
and Kurile Islands. Four Japanese and
three American officials attended the
talks that one described as "very for-
mal - no one invited us to lunch."
It was the first time the Soviet Union
has surrendered items from the Boeing
747. Romanenko denied his crews have
recovered bodies or the cockpit flight
recorders, which could reveal new
details about the last moments of the
doomed plane and why it veered off
course into Soviet airspace.
"I ASKED the Soviets whether they
had found any bodies and they told us
no body had been found," Minoru Tan-
ba told reporters upon returning to
Wakkanai.

Former
Belgian
king inked
to Nazis
dies a l8
BRUSSELS, Belgium - Leopold, the
former kind of Belgium who formally
reigned from 1934 until his abdication in
1951 over criticism of his World War II
relations with Nazi Germany, died
following heart surgery, the palace an-
nounced. He was 81
He was Belgium's fourth king.
Leopold, born Nov. 3, 1901, began his
reign when his father King Altbert died
in February 1934.
A YEAR later his wife, Swedish-born
Queen Astrid, died in an auto crash. 4
After the war broke out, Leopold sat
as a virtual prisoner in his Laeken
palace on the outskirts of Brussels with
his family. After the allied landing in
Normandy in June 1944, Leopold and
his family were taken by the Germans
to Germany and later to Austria.
In September 1944 parliament of-
ficially noted it was impossible for
Leopold to reign because he was ira
German hands. His younger brothers
Prince Charles was made Regent of
Belgium, a post he held until 1950.
ALTHOUGH Leopold and his family
were liberated by the U.S. army in 1945
in Austria, opposition to his return ws
strong. He went into exile with, his
family in Pregny, Switzerland.
Opposition to the king gained further
momentum after the war when it was
revealed he had paid a secret visit to
Hitler. Leopold claimed the trip was to
obtain the release of Belgian prisoners
of war and assurances about Belgian
independence at the end of the war.
Leopold remained in Switzerland un-
til a popular referendum in 1950 voted
57 percent in favor of his return.
But on his return, riots, strikes and
demonstrations rocked the country and
three people died. Leopold, fearing the
outbreak of civil war, agreed to ste
down in favor of his son Baudouin 20,
who took over as Prince Royal.

Resident Philosopher
Even University dorm residents are guaranteed freedom of speech. These second floor MoJo occupants make their mes-
sage more than clear.
Hostin Emmys muddies Rivers

ATTENTENTION UNDERGRADUATES
IT IS YOUR CHANCE TO BE A STAR !

. v

SOPH

SHOW

7Once Upon A Mattress"

MASS MEETING :
AUDITIONS :
For further information, call:

MONDAY, Sept. 26,
4:30-5:30 p.m.
Pendelton Room
Michigan Union
WEDNESDAY, Sept.28,
1:00-4:00 p.m.
Pendelton Room
Michigan Union
763-1107 or 668-6322

HOLLYWOOD - Comedian Joan Rivers, who plays to big
crowds in Las Vegas and often substitutes for "Tonight
Show" host Johnny Carson, found prime-time viewers of the
Emmy Awards a more sensitive audience.
Rivers' caustic cracks, costumes and a curse while co-
hosting the awards show lit up the switchboards at several
major NBC affiliates.
HUNDREDS OF people called to complain about her per-
formance.
As the broadcast began, Miss Rivers asked co-host
comedian Eddie Murphy what his religion was. He replied,
"Catholic."
"Great," said Rivers. "You're a Catholic and a black. I'm
a woman and a Jew and if you had a limp we could be the
committee appointed by James Watt.
"Is he an idiot!"
Following a clip of a popular aerobics program, Rivers
asked Murphy how he stayed in shape, he playfully
whispered in her ear. She shot back, "I wouldn't go near her.
She gave a friend of mine herpes."
Discussing her many dress changes, Rivers said she ap-
preciated how exhausting it must be to be a prostitute.

JOAN CRAWFORD, whose daughter alleges in the book
Mommy Dearest that the actress beat her with a wire coat
hanger, was another target.
After another costume change, Rivers commented, "I just
got it off the rack, that's what Joan Crawford used to say .
about her daughter."
Following another change of costume, Rivers said three
men saw her nude. One got sick, she said, and the others turned
gay.
LATER IN THE routine, Miss Rivers broke another
television taboo - using profanity - by saying, "I've been
waiting to get on the Emmys for many years, but they always
wanted me to sit in the goddamned audience."
Rivers later apologized for her use of profanity, blaming it
on nerves, but she stood by her remarks about WAtt.
In Chicago, NBC affiliate WMAQ had received 145 com-,
plaints and six compliments on Rivers by. noon yesterday,
said spokeswoman Marla Zinkahn.
Zinkann quoted one complainer as saying, "The Emmys
were totally ruined because of Rivers. She has a very foul
mouth and I don't find her funny at all. Her wardrobe was
very tasteless and much too revealing."

1" =

Airport expansion talks revived

(Continued from Page 1)
accomodation. As a professional I am
concerned with having an airport that
meets requirements."
LONG A PROPONENT of upgrading
the airport, Belcher has been thwarted
in his efforts because of a generally un-
favorable attitude toward the action
among council members.

Since 1975, the council has voted
against the recommendations of the
city's Airport Advisory Committee
three times and withheld council ap-
proval of the expansion plans.
In a sudden move in October, 1982
Belcher met with members of the
Michigan Aeronautics Commission and
the Federal Aviation Administration to

tell them that the makeup of the city
council had changed and he wanted to
apply for a federal grant to improve the
airport.
The action drew considerable protesd
from even Republican council mem-
bers, who said Belcher overstepped his
bounds in singlehandedly requesting
aid and approval for the airport expan-
sion.

Student Newspaper at The University of Michigan
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29-35 4.60 9.25 13.90 16.90 19.90 2.80 for sale
help wonted
36-42 5.55 11.10 16.65 20.25 23.85 3.40 roommates
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includes telephone numbers). Seven words equal one line.
Advertisement may be removed from publication. For ads which required prepayment. there will be no refunds.
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Reagan: Door 's open for arms control

(Continued from Page 1)
promise.,
But the president stressed, "We can-
not, however, especially in light of
recent events, compromise on the
necessity of effective verification."
SOME OBSERVERS believe
Reagan's new proposals fall short of a
substantive change but were meant to
reassure the world the United States is
interested in reducing the threat of a
nuclear war.
The Soviets, already aware of
Reagan's proposals, have denounced

them in media notices as "nothing
new."
There was no top-ranking Soviet
leader at the United Nations meeting.
Foreign minister Andrei Gromyko,
missed his first General Assembly
meeting in 25 years when he was barred
from landing at the civilian airport in
New York area.
HE SAID the United States is willing
to accept ways to address Soviet
desires to limit aircraft as well as
missiles - a constant stumbling blick
at the bargaining tables.
Reagan did not go into specifics on

what limits for the huge missiles the
United States is proposing for both
Europe and Asia, but his initiative wal
designed to assuage fears in the world
organization that the United States and
Soviets were heading for a nuclear con-
frontation.
"A nuclear war cannot be wn and
must never be fought," Reagan said. "I
believe that if governments are deter-
mined to deter and prevent war, there
will not be.war."
"The door to an agreement is open. It
is time for the Soviet Union to walk
through it," he said.

IAUDITIONS.
IMPACT JAZZ

INDIVIDUAL THEATRES
5th AyAeeatbe"y 761-9700
$1.50 TUESDAY ALL DAY
MARCELLO MASTROIANNI
HARVEY KEITEL
HANNA "LOLA"SCHYGULLA
CASANOVA, THOMAS PAIN AND
RESTIF DE LA BRETONNE MEET
AND WITNESS THE END OF
ONE WORLD AND THE
BEGINNING OF ANOTHER.
DE VA LNES
TUES. WED.- - (R)
2:30, 4:45, 7:00, 9:15
GERARD DE PARDIEU
TUES. WED.
1:00, 3:15, 5:20. 7:25, 9:30

4

4

AUDITIONS

*
SEPT. 27

7-10 PM.
6-11 PM.

SEPT.

BALLROOM
MICH. UNION
UAC OFFICES
MICH. UNION

I

'i,

29

III

*ATTENDANCE TO BOTH IS REQUIRED*

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