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September 25, 1983 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-09-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4

'M' runs past Wisconsin

(Continued from Page 1)
Schlopy as place kicker after a missed extra point - conver-
ted a 41-yard field goal.
Wisconsin attempted to mount another drive late in the
half, but Wright - who completed just one of seven passes in
the first half - threw a floater that Wolverine defensive back
Evan Cooper intercepted and returned to the Badger 11-yard
line.
Two plays later, Smith sprinted out to his left, turned, and
fired a strike to Nelson two yards deep in the end zone. A two-
point conversion failed, and Michigan led 22-7 at the half.
TAILBACK KERRY Smith and Brian Mercer controlled
the game in the third quarter. Smith who led all rushers with
107 yards, picked up 44 yards on six attempts and added a 10-
yard pass reception as Michigan drove 69 yards for a
Bergeron field goal. Mercer gained 37 of his total 64 yards on
the next series to put the Wolverines in position for fullback.
Dan Rice's five-yard touchdown run.
Wisconsin, however, was not about to lie down, and the
fourth quarter saw them score 14 points to pull close and
scare the Wolverines.
Schembechler inserted quarterback Dave Hall into the
lineup after a Wisconsin punt, but the senior reserve was
unable to handle his first snap, and Wisconsin recovered the
fumble at the Michigan 26.
"I MADE a mistake by putting Hall in there before I gave
him an opportunity to take some snaps," said Schembechler.
"I grabbed him at the last minute and threw him in, and he

fumbled the exchange. If you want to talk about mistakes,
that's my fault."
Wisconsin took advantage of the fumble in four plays.
Wright passed to fullback Marck Harrison for seven yards,
and tailback Larry Emery picked up 15 more off right tackle
on a quick-hitter. Two plays later Wright passed to Harrison
for the score.
With Smith back in the game at quarterback, Michigan
was unable to move the ball against a suddenly fired up
Badger team and was forced to punt.
WISCONSIN WASTED little time moving into scoring
position, and Wright found flanker Michael Jones open at the
flag for a spectacular 32-yard touchdown catch.
That was all for the Badgers, however, as Michigan usedi
its ground game for 14 consecutive running plays, which oc.
nsumed almost seven minutes on the clock and set up Mer-
cer's 11-yard sweep for the clinching score with just 42
seconds remaining in the game.
Bergeron's extra point attempt was blocked - Michigan's
third failed conversion of the day - and Wisconsin was
beaten 38-21.
"TWO INTERCEPTIONS, one fumble and seven offensive
penalties makes for a very frustrating first half," said
Wisconsin coach Dave McClain. "We played very poorly but
a lot of that has to do with Michigan. Today they were a good
football team and we were not. They pounded it at us inside
and that.is where they hurt us."
"Any tailback I had in there ran well in there today," ad-
ded Schembechler. "Under normal circumstances we are
going to mix it up with more than that but we didn't throw
very effectively and the wind was a strong factor."
"All of our backs want the ball because that is what
Michigan does best" added Rogers who gained 59 yards
before leaving the game with a thigh bruise. "The offensive
surge was knocking their defense down the field. I haven't
seen holes that big in a long time.
BOTH TEAM'S records went to 2-1 and the win gav
Schembechler a measure of revenge for the 1981 Wisconsi
game, when the Badgers upset Michigan 21-14.
"The only way Wisconsin was going to beat us was if we
helped them," Schembechler said. "And we helped them. We
missed extra points and fumbled snaps. But if this wasn't
pretty, at least it wasn't like two years ago."

Daily Photo by BRIAN MASCK

Michigan's Evan Cooper has the football sail off his finger tips as he tries for an interception against'
Toon. However, the ball was deflected to fellow Wolverine Tony Gant.
SCORING Total Yards......................................
MICHIGAN................................7 15 10 6-38 Fumbles (No/Lost) ............................
Wisconsin................................. 7 0 0 14-21 Punts (No/Avg) .......................................

Wisconsin's Al

351
1/1
2/30.5

SCORING PLAYS
WISC. - Ellerson 9-yard run (Rohde kick)
MICH. - Rogers 2-yard run (Schiopy kick)
MICH. - Rogers 9-yard run (kick failed)
MICA. - Bergeron 41-yard FG
MICHI - Nelson 7-yard pass from S. Smith (run failed)
MICA - Bergeron 37-yard FG
MICH -Rice 5-yard run (Bergeron kick)
WISC-Harrison 2-yard pass from Wright (Rohde kick)
WISC-Jones 32-yard pass from Wright (Rohde kick)
MICH - Mercer 11-yard run (kick blocked)
First downs ........................................
Rushing (Att/Yds).............................
Passing Net Yards........... ...................
Passing (Att/Comp/Int)...........................

RUSHING
MICHIGAN

K. Smith ......................................
Mercer ........................................
Rogers....................................
Garrett...............................
S. Smith .......................................
Rice...........................................
Armstrong ....................................
Hall ....................................
WISCONSIN
Ellerson ..............................
Harrison...............................
Emery...............................
Wright......... ..................

Att
22
10
10
10
8
5
I
1
Att
12
11
2

Yds
107
64
59
53
49
30
4
-5
Yds
80
43
11
2

Avg
4.8
6.4
5.9
5.3
6.1
6.0
4.0
-5.0
Avg
6.7
3.9
5.5
2.0

139
2/1
5/36.0
TD
0
1
2
0
0
1
0
0
TD
0
0
0

Toon ......................... .......... 1
Armentrout ................................ 1
PASSING
MICHIGAN
Att Comp
S. Smith ............................... 15 5
WISCONSIN
W right ................................ 29 11
RECEIVING
MICHIGAN
Nelson ................................................
K. Smith ..............................................
Rogers ................................................
WISCONSIN
larrison ............................................
Emierson...............................................
Emery . ......................................
Jones .. .. ...................... ........ .........
McFadden .......................................
Pearson .........................................

2
Int
2

2.0 0
1.0 0
Yds TD
42 1

2 89 2

MICi. WISC.

No Yds
3 28
1 10
1 4
No Yds
3 16
3 15
2 11
1 32
1 7
1 8

TD
1
0
0
TD
0
0
0
0
0

26
67/351
42
5/15/2

12
28/139
89
11/29/2

KERRJSE WORDS
BY JOHN KERR

By RON POLLACK
Special to the Daily

MADISON-Starting

split-end Vince

Hang on Scid ey
Bo- shoot or the Moons
T HE PROBLEM that caused Bo Schembechler so much
anguish four years ago is back and it doesn't look like it will
disappear anytime soon.
I'm talking, of course, about the kicking game. Well, at least
half the kicking game. Michigan's punter, Dan Bracken, is solid
but the place kicking is very unstable. It's that old Wolverine
nemesis that seems manifest itself when Michigan can least af-
ford it.
Todd Schlopy, the senior who won the kicking job before the
season, missed an extra point. He also missed one in Michigan's
opener. That could have cost the game, but Washington State's
kicking game wasn't much better as a Cougar field goal that
probably would have meant a tie game,sailed wide. Last week
Schlopy missed a 32-yard kick that would have wrapped up the
game. Instead, Washington came back and won.
Now, Schlopy isn't really a bad kicker, he's just terribly in-
consistent. He's got a good leg, but missing extra points is inex-
cusable. Bo felt the same way so he put in Bob Bergeron to kick
the field goal and extra points after Schlopy's conversion attem-
pt following Michigan's second touchdown was off to the right.
Bergeron probably won himself a starting job next week by
making both his field goal attempts and two extra points. At
least the Wolverines have more than one kicker who is capable
of doing a good job.
That's where Bo's problem is a little different than it was four
years ago. Back then he just had bad kickers. Now he's got some
good legs but no one with any game experience, and when much
of the place kicking is done in crucial situations that can make a
difference.
So it's a good possibility that unless Bergeron steps up and
does an excellent job, Michigan will have to get by, for at least a
year, with a place kicking game that leaves the fans holding
their breath.
That's why Bo should let sophomore kicker Pat Moons get
some game experience for theWolverines. Moons, who has four
years of eligibility, is the player Schembechler recruited out of
Florida who was the top place kicker in the country during his
senior year. He was kicking fifty-yarders in high school and was
an All-American.
Now, however, he can't seem to break into the lineup. Bo and
the coaches say he's coming along but is "inconsistent." Big
deal, so are all the other kickers. Why not let the kid get some
experience this season. Then Bo will have a veteran kicker for
the next three years. Sure, Moons might make some mistakes
and miss some easy kicks, but he has to have some talent. By
keeping him on the sidelines, Schembechler is missing an oppor-
tunity for a fine investment.
After yesterday's, 38-21, win over Wisconsin, Schembechler
said he was generally happy with his team except for one factor.
Guess what that was. "The one thing I'm not happy with is the
kicking game," he said. "It's made me mad. If you ask me what
I didn't like, it's too numerous to say." But he went on to say
anyway. "Missed extra points, blocked kicks, poor kick-offs, it's
all a problem," said Bo.
Unless Schembechler instills some; stability in the kicking
game, the problem won't go away: He can't switch kickers in
and out of the game for the whole season. A kicker can't be ex-
pected to perform well if his next miss will result in his being
benched. Schembechler should just take one of the kickers and
stick with him. And if Moons is half the kicker he is supposed to
be, the Michigan coach should put him in the lineup and leave
him there. Unless, of course, Bo wants to go through all this
again for the next three years.
Blue Banter
+ Michigan defensive lineman Kevin Brooks about Wisconsin's first
touchdown: "Seven points doesn't make a game. We knew that we
couldn't get down. It kind of happened like that last year against-
i,,,a ina mut mp wnn tht vm tn "

'M'wide
receivers
out of
work tin
running
offense

Bean; 0-receptions, 0-yards, 0-
touchdowns. ,
Starting flanker Gilvanni Johnson;-
receptions, 0-yards, 0-touchdowns.
YOU'LL HAVE to excuse Michigan's
wide receivers for feeling a trifle unwan-
ted. In the Wolverine's odyssey back
through time against Wisconsin, yester-
day, to the days of old where manly men
ran the ball and sissy's passed it, Bean an-
d Johnson played the role of idle par-
ticipants.
With the Michigan running game grin-
ding out a punishing 351 yards on 67
carries, the talents of Bean and Johnson
were relatively unneeded.
"Right now, the plays we're calling
aren't designated to go to the wide
receivers," Wolverine quarterback Steve
Smith said after .completing only 5 of fif-
teen passes. "We haven't been in
situations where we needed 10,15 yards a
crack. If you don't need 10,15 yards a
crack, there's no reason to throw the long
ball.
"WE DETERMINED before we came
here that we'd establish a running game.

And we did establish a running game. But
the passing wasn't good. Of course, on a
game like today, we didn't have to pass."
And when there is not a pressing need to
throw, you can bet that a Bo Schembechler-
coached team will not fill the air with foot-
balls. "At Michigan, when you're running
the ball well you don't pass much," Bean
said. "Bo is like that. He likes that three
yards and a cloud of dust theory."
Bean wishes that his fiesty coach didn't
like this theory quite so much. "For a
receiver it's frustrating," Bean said. "I
want to catch the ball: But when backs go
four or five yards a carry, there's nbt
much you can do."
BEAN HAS caught five passes in three
games this season, while Johnson has
hauled in but one. Bean, however, does not
feel that Wolverine receivers are destined
to be forgotten men all season.
"Teams will force us to mix it up more,"
said Bean, who caught all five of his passes
last week against Washington. "I think 30
or 40 catches is attainable for me. I think
some games I won't catch any or very few.
And some games we'll be forced to pass
and I'll catch a lot."
During their leave of pass-receiving ab-
scence, Bean and Johnson have spent most

of their time run blocking, not always a
favorite amongst pass catchers.
"I CAN'T speak for Gilvanni, but I'm not
crazy about it," Bean said. "But I know it
has to be done."
Although Bean and Johnson have both
gone without a reception in two of the
Wolverines three games this season, other
members of the offense have prospered
when it has taken to the air.
. Most notably, tight end Sim Nelson now
has 12 receptions (three yesterday for 28
yards and one touchdown) and Michigan
running backs have combined for 13 more.
ONE OF the main reasons for this sud-
den diversification of the passing attack is
that wide-receiver Anthony Carter is no
longer around to make opposing players
quiver with fright as he did the past four
years.
"We looked at Anthony a lot more and
designed things for him," Smith said.
"Now we can be more diversified."
Said=center Tom Dixon, We all miss
Anthony simply because he was an ex-
cellent athlete. A defense had to feel in-
secure with him out there. But we've done
more. things with the tight end and for-
mations. So we've done things that have
been effective."

Ha wkeyes down.-Ohio State, 20-14

IOWA CITY (AP) - Chuck Long threw two touchdown
passes, including a 73-yard bomb to Dave Moritz late in
the game, and Tom Nichol kicked a pair of field goals to
give No. 7 Iowa a 20-14 victory over third-ranked Ohio
State in Big Ten Conference football.
A record Kinnick Stadium crowd of 66,175 saw Iowa
break a 16-game losing streak to Ohio State and send its
record to 3-0. Ohio State, which had not lost to Iowa since
1962, moves to 2-1.
THE GAME lacked offensive fireworks until Long
connected with Moritz for the clinching touchdown with
4:25 remaining. With Iowa facing a third-and-six at its
own 27, Moritz sped by Ohio State defender Shaun Gayle,
hauled in a perfect pass from Long at the Buckeye 37 and
zigzagged his way to the end zone.
Quarterback Mike Tomczak then drove Ohio State 66
yards, capping the march with a 4-yard touchdown pass
to fullback Vaughn Broadnax with 2:21 left in the game.
Ohio State got the ball one more time, but Iowa's
Devon Mitchell intercepted a Tomczak pass with 22
seconds remaining to seal the victory.
DOWN 7-3 at halftime, Iowa took the lead on its first
possession of the third quarter when Long fired a 16-yard
touchdown pass to tight end Mike Hufford to cap a 50-
yard drive with 12:09 left in the period.
Later in the quarter, Iowa's Mike Stoops intercepted a
pass to set up a 47-yard field goal by Nichol.
Nichol booted a 25-yard field goal to give Iowa a 3-0
lead with 8:12 left in the first quarter. Ohio State came
right back to go ahead 7-3 on Keith Byars' one-yard
touchdown run with 1:43 left in the quarter.
Byars, who set up his TD with a 46-yard run to the
Iowa 4, hurt his knee late in the first half and did not
return to the game. He had gained 98 yards in nine
carries to that point. Long outdueled Tomczak in a battle
between two of the country's top passers. Long, ranked
third nationally in passing efficiency, completed 16 of 26
for 270 yards. Tomczak, the national leader, hit only 13 of
34 for 121 yards.
Illinois 20, Michigan State 10
EAST LANSING (AP) - Quarterback Jack Trudeau
engineered a pair of second-quarter touchdowns as
Illinois defeated Michigan State 20-10 in the Big Ten
football opener for both schools Saturday.
The defeat was especially costly for the Spartans, who
lost quarterback Dave Yarema with a separated shoulder
in the first auarter and backup Rick Kolb with a broken

30 attempts for 189 yards, with two interceptions. The
three Michigan State quarterbacks, combined, com-
pleted only six of 17 for 104 yards.
Both teams are 2-1 on the season.
Northwestern 10, Indiana 8
BLOOMINGTON, Ind. (AP) - Sandy Schwab passed
28 yards to Tony Coates for a third-quarter touchdown
and freshman John Duvie kicked a 47-yard field goal in
the final period Saturday, lifting Northwestern a 10-8
Big Ten Conference.football victory over Indiana.
The two ,scores by the Wildcats, their first points in
three games this season, gave them a 10-0 lead before
Indiana's only scoring drive of the game.
PENALTIES hurt both teams most of the game, and
the first NU touchdown came late in the third quarter af-
ter a 48-yard punt return by Steve Tasker gave the Wild-
cats possession at the Indiana 38. Short runs by Ricky
Edwards, Claudell Roberts and Schwab put the ball at

the 28, and Schwab hit Coates on the next play for the
touchdown.
The victory lifted Northwestern to 1-0 in the Big Ten
and 1-2 for all games. Indiana dropped to 0-1 and 1-2.
Northwestern, which had totaled only 73 yards rushing
in its first two- games of the season, managed 152 in the
first half alone. Despite the yardage, however, the Wild-
cats weren't able to score.
TWO NORTHWESTERN drives were halted by pass
interceptions, and the Wildcats' best scoring threats of
the first half ended deep in Indiana territory when field
goal attempts of 36 and 31 yards bye Duvic were blocked
by Indiana freshman linebacker Van Waiters.
Indiana, meanwhile, had an apparent touchdown
nullified by a pass interference call against tight end
Scott McNabb.
Late in the first quarter, following the first block by
Waiters, the Hoosiers drove to the Northwestern 4-yard
line before *Bradley threw to McNabb in the end zone.

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