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September 23, 1983 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-09-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4

INDIVIDUAL THEATRES
5th Ae at lberty 761-9700
$2.00 WED. SAT. SUN. SHOWS BEFORE 6 PM
A NIGHT WHEN CASANOVA,
THOMAS PAIN AND RESTIF
DE LA BRETONNE MEET AND
WITNESS THE END OF ONE
WORLD AND THE BEGINNING
OF ANOTHER.
MARCELLO
MASTROIANNI
HARVEY
KEITEL
HANNA
SCHYGULLA
LA NUIT DE VARENNES
FRI. 7:00, 9:15
SAT., SUN. 2:30, 4:45, 7:00, 9:15_
HE'S ON TRIAL FOR BEING
AN IMPOSTER. IF FOUND
GUILTY HE WILL HANG.
GERARD DE PARDIEU
Pma 9
FRI. 7:25, 9:30
SAT., SUN. 1:10, 3:15, 5:20, 7:25, 9:30

ARTS
Friday, September 23, 1983

Page 6

The Michigan Daily.

Fellows twist allnight

By Jane Carl
BIG TWIST and the Mellow Fellows
sounds suspiciously like a new
candy bar, but in reality it is an eight
piece, Chicago-based rhythm and blues
band that will appear at the U-Club
tonight.
Born during an all-night jam session
in Carbondale, the brassy blues band
perform '60s soul, gospel, blues, and
rap songs with their own special brand
of hard-drivingrhythms. Vocals are
supplied by the 6-foot-4-inch, 300-
pounds-plus Larry "Big Twist" Nolan,
a veteral of the Chicago soul scene.

He began his career singing behind
chicken wire to avoid flying bottles in
Southern Illinois' redneck bars - just
like the Blues Brothers. From a growl
to a pristine falsetto, Big Twist's in-
credible vocal range and individual,
style are as impeccable as his three-
piece suits and matching fedoras.
In 1976 the core of the group - Nolan,
sax player Terry Ogolini, and guitarist
Pete Special - migrated to Chicago to
create a classic R&B revue. Hooking up
with five hot players, the multi-racial
septet called the "Mellow Fellows"
began.
The Fellows, a young ensemble, con-
tains a variety of up and coming
musicians trained by masters.
Keyboard player Sid Wingfield toured
with Luther Allison. Paul Howard,
trumpet, and Jim Exum, trombone, are
former members of the Tyrone Davis
band, and drummer Willie Hayes was
with the Mighty Joe Young group.

Packing more of a punch than their
name suggests, the group is known for
their funk rendition of Mancini's "Peter
Gunn" theme.
After several appearances at New
York's Lone Star Cafe, the band has
found a following in the East, not to
mention their Midwestern and Southern
audiences. The group's first album on
Flying Fish Records, an independent
folk label, received national critical ac-
claim for their renditions of R&B stan-
dards. Subsequent albums have seen an
evolution to a more contemporary
sound. Playing for Keeps, their most
recent album (released on the Alligator
label), runs the gamut of the blues
without ignoring a new, pop-oriented
feeling.
Sure to spark some hot, dance floor
action, the group's two shows will be at
8 and 10 p.m. in the U-Club, with tickets
on sale at the door and in advance at the
Michigan Union Ticket Office.

s Presents -
K4/

Major Events Presents:
huek.
mangione
Oct.13
Hill Auditorium
8pm
Michigan Union Ticket Office, CTC Outlets
763-2071

Big Twist and the Mellow Fellows will rock your Friday night away at the U-
Club.
No monarchs among

Sun., Oct.r23
Crisler Arena
8pm
12.50,11.50,10.50
On Sale 9/23/83
MI Union Ticket
Office.CTC
763-2071

these
By Chris Laue
A NN ARBOR CI
production of Bu
gave the impression
pell-mell. The play is
ficult to direct becaus
schizophrenic. Ther
watching a melodra
the consciousness ofc
was happening back
one-liners were grea
tion failed to capitali
comedic vision on a g
Barraged by suc
"two's company, thr
corny gags as when
loses her wig - wh
supposed to do exce
"this is cute" during1
Don Baker, hero, go
moves to New Y
Napolitano played th
was great pretending

'Butterflies'
,r set consisted of Don's apartment and
included a loft-like bed left by the for-
mer occupant, who Don says "likes to
VIC THEATER'S sleep high." Don meets Jill, the girl
tterflies Are Free next door, and before you know it, the
of melodramatic adjoining door is forced ajar, creating
s intrinsically dif- more open living arrangements. This is
e its premise ieso one of the few melodramas where hero
e nothing like and h'eroine end up in bed before the fir-
ma influenced by st scene is over. But don't think this
on usnsthat wasn't good, clean fun - the curtain
in the 60sr The was dropped after an embrace.
t, but the produc- Next scene, Don's mother catches
sze on the author's them in bed - same old story of old
raner scale. morality clashing with the new. She
h meta-jokes as wants Don to come back home with her.
ee's an orgy" and Ann Antell, as the mother, delivered
the girl next door some great deadpan lines.
at is the audience Jill's conflict is that she doesn't want
pt maybe whisper any serious commitments. Referring to
the intermission, her earlier marriage of six days, she
od guy, and blind, says it "seemed like weeks." Jill
ork City. Dean declares Don "groovy" but then splits
e role of Don and with another guy.
g to be blind. The See BUTTERFLIES Page, 7

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